I just dropped the price of
the permaculture playing cards
for a wee bit.

 

 

uses include:
- infecting brains with permaculture
- convincing folks that you are not crazy
- gift giving obligations
- stocking stuffer
- gambling distraction
- an hour or two of reading
- find the needle
- find the 26 hidden names

clickity-click-click

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Garden picture exchange!  RSS feed

 
Marianne Cicala
gardener
Posts: 685
Location: south central VA 7B
83
bee books forest garden fungi solar trees
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last of the lavender put to good use - looking forward to crawling into bed!
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Devon Olsen
Posts: 1068
Location: SE Wyoming -zone 4
7
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everyone has nice pictures, i have recently taken quite a lot but i have to force myself to download them to my computer and then put them on the site so idk when im gonna do that whole lot but here is a couple of teaser photos provided courtesy of my father

a little dark but theyre not going in a magazine so i think they look awesome for this purpose

one is the pathway between the hugelkultur beds
one is a polyculture with wheat, radish and sunflower, plus a few other companions
and one is another polyculture with wheat and radishes(all of which are too small and tough to eat but theyre growing on the soil so thats great)
the stakes are there to mark what variety of wheat is growing in that area
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Matu Collins
Posts: 1977
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
70
bee books chicken forest garden fungi trees
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Here is a view of one of my hugelbeets which I stuck stakes into in hopes of getting birds to perch, for beans to climb up etc.

The birds are perching!
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Leila Rich
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
88
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Dustin Wilkinson,
Your post was moved to a new topic.
 
katherine lyle
Posts: 16
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Well, I have nothing that can even be worthy to show here but anyone in Southeast Texas?
 
Dustin Wilkinson
Posts: 43
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Katherine, no gettin down on yourself... You found this forum so you've got gifts to give!

I'm in ND but going to WA in AUG...

You looking at Houston?
 
Irene Kightley
pollinator
Posts: 388
Location: South West France
31
chicken food preservation forest garden fungi hunting solar
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Can't resist posting some more, I've a huge garden !

spring colour on the path to the house


chickens cleaning up new hugelkultur bed


late spring looking down to the hen house


Cool little summer retreat next to the forest garden
 
katherine lyle
Posts: 16
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That is so beautiful. I wish I lived there. You must be very happy. My beans are growing and My squash plants are huge!
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Mike Sved
Posts: 42
Location: Geraldton, Ontario -Zone 1b
1
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First year of our first ever hugelbed in Zone 1b, northern Ontario.

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Travis Toner
Posts: 33
Location: Tokyo
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Mike Sved wrote:First year of our first ever hugelbed in Zone 1b, northern Ontario.



I always love to see the steeper hugelkultur! Much like Sepp describes in his book.
 
katherine lyle
Posts: 16
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My Gardens
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john giroux
Posts: 151
Location: Cumming, GA
7
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here are some local pollinators and blueberries. they ar e doing awesome this year.
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bumblebumblebees
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blueberries. .
 
Patrick Mann
Posts: 308
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
3
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Irene Kightley wrote:Can't resist posting some more, I've a huge garden !

Too bad you haven't been able to keep up the blog recently. I enjoyed the permaculture posts and noticing the subtle differences in implementation in France.
 
dirk walls
Posts: 5
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My little garden. Just moved here in November and spent most of my time clearing out blackberry vines. Hopefully next year I can have a nicer set up.



more pics here: http://imgur.com/a/TxVZ2
 
Renee Belisle
Posts: 6
Location: geraldton, ontario
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Mike Sved wrote:First year of our first ever hugelbed in Zone 1b, northern Ontario.

more images of the construction and progress of this hugelkultur here: http://s1274.photobucket.com/user/whiskeychikaho/library/Hugelkultur?sort=4&page=1

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Matu Collins
Posts: 1977
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
70
bee books chicken forest garden fungi trees
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Here is a view with some of the massive winter squash plants growing in this year's new hugelbeet in the foreground. Further back you can see the inner part of the spiral which has a variety of thriving plants on it including but not limited to: lacinato kale, our own kale from seeds we've saved for years, onion, husk cherry, basil, sweet peppers, various green beans, chamomile, lots of white clover, wild strawberry...

Behind that is a hearty bed of mature wormwood.
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David Good
gardener
Posts: 522
Location: Equatorial tropics
30
books forest garden
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@Katherine Lyle

Is that a yam climbing in the background? If so - what kind?

I've fallen in love with Dioscorea alata... darned delicious roots.
 
Julia Winter
steward
Posts: 2142
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
194
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
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Seven fruits in one day! (pretty good for less than an acre)
 
David Good
gardener
Posts: 522
Location: Equatorial tropics
30
books forest garden
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I don't have anything near as amazing as these pics. My gardens are brutally utilitarian right now and suffering from the heat... except for the front-yard food forest area, and my backyard greywater oasis.

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Julia Winter
steward
Posts: 2142
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
194
bee bike chicken food preservation hugelkultur urban
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The blueberries are in the second terrace in this picture. Right up at the top is an ornamental elderberry, with finely divided, dark purple leaves, almost black. People think it's a Japanese maple, but those shouldn't grow in our climate. . .
 
David Good
gardener
Posts: 522
Location: Equatorial tropics
30
books forest garden
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By the way - since some of you Northerners might not recognize what I'm growing, a few of the plants in those pics are chaya, papaya, cannas (edibles flowers and roots), malanga (the elephant ears), florida cranberry, plus some other useful species like wormwood, milkweed, comfrey and the (probably toxic) ornamental cold-hardy cassava.
 
David Good
gardener
Posts: 522
Location: Equatorial tropics
30
books forest garden
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Love the rocks, Julia!
 
Adam Klaus
author
gardener
Posts: 946
Location: 6200' westen slope of colorado, zone 6
65
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Finally learned how to put photos in the post. Enjoy some pics of the market garden-
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compost, peas, peppers, three sisters
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garlic, brassicas and carrots, cows looking on
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greens, onions and shallots, cukes, green beans, cabbage and carrots
 
David Good
gardener
Posts: 522
Location: Equatorial tropics
30
books forest garden
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Very nice, Adam. How's the flavor on that lacinato kale? I'm going to grow that this winter - haven't tried it yet, so I'm in the dark.
 
Adam Klaus
author
gardener
Posts: 946
Location: 6200' westen slope of colorado, zone 6
65
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thanks david- lacinato kale is the superior kale, IMO. it is the only kale I will eat, and the only variety I grow. I get my seeds from Seeds From Italy, they are very economical and excellent quality. highly reccomended.
 
Cris Bessette
gardener
Posts: 823
Location: North Georgia / Appalachian mountains , Zone 7A
38
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David Goodman wrote:By the way - since some of you Northerners might not recognize what I'm growing, a few of the plants in those pics are chaya, papaya, cannas (edibles flowers and roots), malanga (the elephant ears), florida cranberry, plus some other useful species like wormwood, milkweed, comfrey and the (probably toxic) ornamental cold-hardy cassava.


Looks tropical, what kind of banana plants are those? I have some musa basjoo and musa sikkimensis , but they are not known for making edible fruit.
 
Alex Ames
Posts: 406
Location: Georgia
5
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Beans,tomatoes and okra.
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Dave Miller
pollinator
Posts: 416
Location: Zone 8b: SW Washington
15
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My apple tree guild over time:









 
Christopher Kerrschneider
Posts: 25
Location: Iowa
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Here are a few of my favorite shots from the garden this year!!!
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Lovely Sunflower
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Three sister corn plus some other goodies
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Tomatillo!
 
Gary Park
Posts: 146
Location: St. Louis, MO
2
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Maybe the best pic for this season;
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Matu Collins
Posts: 1977
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
70
bee books chicken forest garden fungi trees
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Huge squash plants are marching off in all directions from my hugelbeet. Here are tendrils trying to grab onto the woodchip path.
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Adam Klaus
author
gardener
Posts: 946
Location: 6200' westen slope of colorado, zone 6
65
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times are getting exciting in the garden, cant see it but melons are almost ripe, peppers are bright red, broccoli is in full harvest. still lots to look forward to, but times are good-
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Miles Flansburg
master steward
Posts: 4139
Location: Zones 2-4 Wyoming and 4-5 Colorado
195
bee books forest garden fungi greening the desert hugelkultur
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Adam, if you keep that up I am gonna have to come over there !
 
Adam Klaus
author
gardener
Posts: 946
Location: 6200' westen slope of colorado, zone 6
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You'd be welcome Miles. The good times just keep getting better...
 
Landon Sunrich
pollinator
Posts: 1703
Location: Western Washington
21
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Former orchard/vineyard/garden lost to time and disregard. The entire bit of it has been shaded over by three ceder trees I have been slowly thinning. I did some pruning on the grapes last winter (but not enough me thinks) Garden totally lost, grapes not bearing. There are two bearing fruit trees. A cherry and an exceptionally fruitful plum. The asian pear (fore ground of first picture has climbed to 25 feet tall to try and escape the ceders shade. I think it is a total loss. I am hoping to revive the grapes.

None of the trees seen in the last picture shaded out this lot when it was planted 20 years ago

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Facing North
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Grapes
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Facing South
 
Robert Ray
gardener
Posts: 1351
Location: Cascades of Oregon
12
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This was a quick down and dirty hugel bed from this spring. chicken pen and rabbit litter over logs and brush from winter kill.
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David Good
gardener
Posts: 522
Location: Equatorial tropics
30
books forest garden
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Here are some shots from my South Florida Food Forest project:

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David Good
gardener
Posts: 522
Location: Equatorial tropics
30
books forest garden
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@Cris Bessette

I totally missed your question on the bananas.

The ones in my backyard are from an unknown variety. I call them "foreclosure bananas," since I dug them up from a friend's property that was getting taken by the bank. They make tasty fruit - sort of a square, squat banana that's thicker than the ones from the store. Really tasty.



Unfortunately, I don't live in the true tropics so about every second banana crop gets frozen off...
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Cris Bessette
gardener
Posts: 823
Location: North Georgia / Appalachian mountains , Zone 7A
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David Goodman- Nice pic. Cigar and nanners lol

I use banana plants in my landscape for the "tropical" look they give.

The majority of the banana plants I have (musa basjoo) are used for textiles mostly in Asia , and have weird little 2 inch long inedible fruit.
I also have Himalayan bananas (musa sikkimensis) Those are supposedly to make somewhat edible fruit, with big black seeds. (none of these have fruited for me yet)
The problem is finding a variety that will grow in this zone, fruit in a shorter season, and make edible fruit.


I heard a year or two ago that the typical grocery store banana (musa cavendish) is having so many disease problems down in South America that they may be wiped out.
Producers are scrambling to find a replacement edible, seedless banana to replace it with. http://www.mnn.com/food/stories/bananapocalypse


Sounds like good enough reason for me to apply some permaculture techniques so I could conceivably have my own variety and not have to depend on South American banana
republics and their monoculture bananas.






 
Chris Newton
Posts: 20
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This thread has ignited many ooohs and aaahs in me - thanks

This is a pic of 'three sisters' plantings outside our 'earth lodge'
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