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Living rhizome barrier plants

 
Maine Aaron
Posts: 32
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I really need to keep the quack grass from the mown grass/clover path area out of my annual gardens and forest garden... so i'm thinking of a border for cultivated areas about 3' wide with 2+ species with dense roots to stand guard around the edge. So far i have tried it in one area with just bocking 14 comfrey and it has worked well so far. Next i'm trying Sorrel and turkish rocket with yarrow in front of it. Have other people had success with this method? What other species might work well?
 
James Colbert
Posts: 265
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Look into vetiver grass. Very very dense roots.
 
Patrick Mann
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Location: Seattle, WA, USA
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rhubarb, iris, mint, burdock
 
Maine Aaron
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Patrick Mann wrote:rhubarb, iris, mint, burdock

I will try out some of those, thanks!
James Colbert wrote:Look into vetiver grass. Very very dense roots.

That's a good idea, but it is not hardy here, i should have mentioned i am in zone 5.
 
Peter Ellis
Posts: 1304
Location: Central New Jersey
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Iris? I would never have guessed. Interesting.
 
Maine Aaron
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Siberian iris seems like it would work great, german/japanese iris seem like they wouldn't work at all.
 
Ann Torrence
steward
Pie
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Location: Torrey, UT; 6,840'/2085m; 7.5" precip; 125 frost-free days
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bee books chicken duck goat trees
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muscari bulbs have formed dense borders for me, as have chives.
 
Tim Wells
Posts: 119
Location: Essex, England, 51 deg
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Periwinkle - Vinca Major is a good barrier plant and fully hardy in uk 2-3 foot clump-forming and spreading. There are also 1 foot max creeping Vinca Minor, but not sure if they are as or medicinal as V . maj:

The leaves, and seeds of the periwinkle contain vincamine, a precursor to the chemical vinpocetine, which is used medicinally to naturally enhance memory in aging minds.1,2 Vincamine is sold as a chemical extract in supplement form, however herbalists prefer the whole herb be used in either extract or tea form. By using the whole herb you receive the balanced blend of healing chemicals found naturally occurring in the plant. Other folk medicine uses include Diabetes, cough medicine, and as a styptic to stop bleeding.

Preparation Methods & Dosage :Teas, tinctures, supplements
 
Mark Chadwick
Posts: 81
Location: Cranbourne, Victoria, AUSTRALIA
chicken forest garden urban
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Comfrey planted densely is said to stop running grasses cold.
 
Michael Cox
Posts: 1570
Location: Kent, UK - Zone 8
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I'll second Ann's recommendation for Chives.

I planted some in a hedge and they are doing amazingly well. They go to seed every year and have filled in gaps nicely. We don't have running grasses to test against, but I can't see anything getting through.
 
Patrick Mann
Posts: 302
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
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Japanese Mugwort - though the cure may be worse than the disease. At least it smells good.
 
Margie Nieuwkerk
Posts: 50
Location: Bulgaria, Zone 7/8
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I too am finding that Irises work, they form a very dense mat. I've also found that oregano and thyme do the job really well, nothing seems to really poke through them. I've just started planting chives, so I am really looking forward to seeing how that works.
 
S Bengi
Posts: 1355
Location: Massachusetts, Zone:6/7, AHS:4, Rainfall:48in even distribution
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Garlic Chive
 
Jay Grace
Posts: 229
Location: Nauvoo, AL
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I use Oxalis. (at least that is what I think it is)
It looks pretty much like a lighter colored clover with pink flowers. Down here in Alabama it grows like wildfire and forms a super dense mat. It doesn't spread fast but when you dig it up and separate the clumps then replant it. It fills back in rather quickly forming a clump about a foot around in a few seasons.

 
Patrick Mann
Posts: 302
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
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Speaking of oxalis ... Oca does a pretty good job of suppressing other things, as does Mashua (vining nasturtiums). If your winter is not too harsh they will regrow from tubers the following year. And you can eat them as well.
 
Travis Krause
Posts: 26
Location: D'Hanis, Texas
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Maximilian Sunflower and Goldenrod.... Very easy to establish and drought hardy.

Both grow very dense (and tall).

,Travis Krause
-parkercreekranch.com
 
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