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Composting 30,000lbs of Food Waste -Ashley's Crazy Business and Homestead

 
Posts: 79
Location: British Columbia
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Dillon Nichols wrote:Behold, the fastest ugliest sketch possible of what I was trying to describe above..



OMG the doodle worked! It makes sense now! I like it!

I was also thinking maybe I should purchase a small utility trailer? Then instead of driving around my huge old F250 I could use my van or even a different small car in the future.

Terry:

I love the idea of mixing my own feed. I just need to start tracking down where I can buy stuff in bulk that is good quality. Any resources on sprouting for chickens? Is it just the same as sprouting for people?

I've played around with fermenting feed before. All my feeders are designed for dry feed. I guess I could just make a big tub for wet feed.
 
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Location: NE Iowa
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forest garden hunting chicken
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Ashley Cottonwood wrote:I love the idea of mixing my old feed. I just need to start tracking down where I can buy stuff in bulk that is good quality. Any resources on sprouting for chickens? Is it just the same as sprouting for people?
I've played around with fermenting feed before. All my feeders are designed for dry feed. I guess I could just make a big tub for wet feed.


It's the same, but you don't have to worry about the results so much. And chickens of course will eat both ends!
Here are two examples, one is making almost fodder, while the other is only sprouting:
https://the-chicken-chick.com/sprouting-grains-for-chickens-fodder/
http://vomitingchicken.com/easiest-sprouts-for-chickens-ever/



 
pollinator
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Location: Victoria BC
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Ashley Cottonwood wrote:

Dillon Nichols wrote:Behold, the fastest ugliest sketch possible of what I was trying to describe above..



OMG the doodle worked! It makes sense now! I like it!

I was also thinking maybe I should purchase a small utility trailer? Then instead of driving around my huge old F250 I could use my van or even a different small car in the future.



If your pickup locations and future likely ones are trailer friendly this would likely be a cost-saver in the long run, *if* the van or other vehicle is needed anyhow, or if itwould let you take the truck off the road?

I use my old diesel fullsize for everything, because I drive infrequently enough that the cost of insuring a second vehicle exceeds the fuel savings.. before even looking at maintenance/depreciation on the second vehicle.

(I hate taking my trailer into town, but my town is short on trailer friendly parking, and my combined length is about 47ft..)
 
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"Buying a bulk mix from a feed grain. A friend of mine cuts their cost of their pasture raised pigs by buying an organic mix. Sure beats those $18 bags of organic feed."

Alternative: Find a peanut processor. Many sell peanut sweepings in bulk bags for cheap. As part of a custom mix the peanut sweepings can constitute the majority of the protein source. Just watch those shipping costs.
 
pollinator
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Thomas

I believe most grocery stores have their vegetable left overs already allocated. If not to a specific user, by the boss to the locked dumpster to avoid becoming known as a free food station. But I think most left overs get used, at least in larger cities where there are people to organize it.

Cheers,
Rufus
 
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Reading this thread got me motivated.  I stopped last evening at a shop that makes juices by juicing veggies.  I know from dumpster diving that they throw everything out.  So, I stopped, made a few inquiries, and emailed the manager.  He's on-board with me picking up compostable materials on a daily basis to use as feed supplement and soil improvement.  
I think the volume is going to be more than I can handle, but I'm going to give it a shot!  It's also not really what I need for the chickens and goats - mostly fiber and vitamins, not so much carbs and protein, but it's something.  
Now I have to determine how to best feed it out, what quantity to feed (rest will be spread over garden areas), etc.  Anyone have any advice on using fruit and veggie pulp?  
 
Terry Bytes
Posts: 21
Location: NE Iowa
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Thomas Dean wrote:Reading this thread got me motivated.  I stopped last evening at a shop that makes juices by juicing veggies.  I know from dumpster diving that they throw everything out.  So, I stopped, made a few inquiries, and emailed the manager.  He's on-board with me picking up compostable materials on a daily basis to use as feed supplement and soil improvement.  
I think the volume is going to be more than I can handle, but I'm going to give it a shot!  It's also not really what I need for the chickens and goats - mostly fiber and vitamins, not so much carbs and protein, but it's something.  
Now I have to determine how to best feed it out, what quantity to feed (rest will be spread over garden areas), etc.  Anyone have any advice on using fruit and veggie pulp?  



You can still turn that into carbs & protein for your chickens. Set up a 2 -pile compost system, and add it to one of the piles, mixed with whatever green/brown you think you need to balance it. Once it starts rotting and you have bacteria, bugs, flies & larva doing their job, start adding to the 2nd pile only, and open this first pile to your chickens to scratch & discover the fruit-pulp-fed bugs.
 
john mcginnis
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Thomas Deanoing wrote: to be more than I can handle, but I'm going to give it a shot!  It's also not really what I need for the chickens and goats - mostly fiber and vitamins, not so much carbs and protein, but it's something.  
Now I have to determine how to best feed it out, what quantity to feed (rest will be spread over garden areas), etc.  Anyone have any advice on using fruit and veggie pulp?  



Two suggestions:

A) Composting worms. You would have work up a bedding mix as pure pulp would probably go anaerobic. But the worms would love the pulp. Plus is in a basement or greenhouse it could be a year round thing.
B) Solider Flies. Same with (A) on bedding though the consumption rate would be much higher. Downside is its seasonal.

Either choice you just feed the output to the chickens as a protein source.

Good luck!
 
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Location: WNC 6b
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kids foraging chicken
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Totally awesome! We had a composting business in our old town. The cleaning of buckets was time consuming. Def consider creating a space to wash buckets/bins. We used a toilet brush to clean the buckets. Requires less water than rinsing. The water from the rinsing can be used to water gardens/trees.

 
Rufus Laggren
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One last comment on schlepping bins.

1) TommyLift (liftgates in general). That is probably more _and_ less than you need. Liftgates are heavy, expensive, complex, and slow. They are "mature tech", so when properly maintained they should perform and last, and they lift really heavy stuff. But. They lift slowwwwwly and you don't need the weight capacity for your bins. They also have a learning curve which for reasons of safety needs to be taken seriously.

2) Trailer. Really good idea provided it will go where you need it. A trailer can be pretty low, meaning both that plain physical schlepping is easier, but also that a (relatively) short ramp/gate off the back will allow you to roll bins onto it (bins w/wheels, of course; but I guess you could just drag them...). Less energy needed to climb in and out when positioning the bins for transport. I have seen lawn companies around here running a hitch carrier which places the ball higher than actually proper for their trailer. They do this to lower the rear of the trailer to make the ramp work better. Or install a two legged crane at the rear of the trailer bed. IIRC, utility trailers weight in about 1300#. Your payload might max out at 1000# on a big day. (Check these guesses.)  Most vehicles which will accept a 2" hitch installation will pull 2300#. And IIRC that is below weight where trailer brakes are required - and _that_ is a cost saver provided your vehicle weighs over 2500#. Trade off with stopping distance, of course.

Regards,
Rufus

 
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