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Not-killing houseplants. Aloe seems brown thumb friendly. What else?

 
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Hahaha! I feel at home now

I've murdered so many aloe plants, I should be on a list for plants to watch out for! That said, the current aloe plant in have is a few years old now and I did manage to separate them. I don't think it had pups as much as the tiny pot it came in was getting quite crowded. I'll say it has been much happier being ignored, than me "trying to make it happy."

I've got a spider plant from an old job I had for gosh... getting to be years now too. I tend to plant some babies then gift away the big mama plant. Of course I dunno why it's so happy now. I've never seen mine have this many babies. Guess it likes being close to the ceiling.

Wandering Jew! I got mine from a hippie shop in my mid 20s with some other trailing plants in a "fancy" pot set up. All the other things in the pot died eventually. I did manage to get them to propagate a few times. I don't remember what was the last straw for the others, but the wandering Jew is still alive and well!!! She likes the neglect too. I've been selling some cuttings at the farmer's market. Easy keeper and it's purple!

Grabbed a chunk of a jade plant from a discarded trash pile at a home Depot type store. It's alive, not happy, but alive!

Pathos too are easy. The don't want water until they get droopy. Then I stick the whole pot in a few inches of water overnight. It gets water heavy again and back to ignoring it.

Oh! Big plant tip here. At the end of the season clearance plants. The ones that are barely alive for 2 or 3 bucks, esp the ferns. Those are the survivors! I've had Ferny now for.... almost 20yrs now
 
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r ranson
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Well, I'm starting to be a plant mum.

I even ordered plants on the internet.  

Sansevieria cylindrica rooted cutting and monstera deliciosa cutting (with air root).  (I need to find out the english words for these soon).

Now they look very small in the photo, but I'm not sure if I'm up for these or not.  

The crazy thing is, the price of houseplants is through the roof right now.  I'm still looking for my aspidistra (it's on my bucket list to own one).  I found one this winter for $275.  It was looking like it was dying which is not a good sign on the one kind of plant that is nearly impossible to kill.  I keep on looking.

Not killing plants is addictive, I hope I can keep it up.  
 
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Pineapple.  

We live in South-western Ontario, Canada, Zone 5b outside.

Inside, we deal often with flea beetles and other houseplant pests, have a west facing window, and have three pineapple plants in 3 gallon containers.

They are tall, sharp, serrated BEASTS, but the bugs don't seem to affect them, they tolerate neglect/drought well, and well - here's the thing - every two-ish years our one 'mother' plant has grown a pineapple for us to eat.  


I water them on a "oh snap -riiiiight!" schedule.  Sometimes I can tell when their leaves wither a bit they'd probably want more water, but mostly they're just there, sitting in the window.   Because pineapple *ARE* drought plants, they do seem to thrive on neglect and the occasional litre of water you douse them with because you don't know when you last watered them, nor when you will water them in the future.
They're insectivores, too, which helps them feed themselves.  Every once in a while you just add more soil to the pot, because they keep producing 2.5' spears and admire them from afar.  

Cats don't seem to bother with them.  I wouldn't trust tinier children with them - I'm not kidding when I say they can flay you alive.  I've had run ins with my three plants wherein I got a good patch of skin removed from me.  
The ripe pineapple harvested from your own living room though?  Divine.  It takes a while for the flower to grow to a mini pineapple fruit, then ripen.
In the last three weeks just before it turns yellow, you have this rich pineapple scent that wafts and teases.  

When we harvested the first pineapple off our plant, we were just agog.  How the heck?  Fully formed, medium sized pineapple that just melted in our mouths.  
If it hadn't happened to us, I'd call the person telling this tale a fantastic liar.
Like, really, I kill plants.  I can keep a snake plant / sansevarius alive, and the golden pothos, the peace lily, and these freaking pineapple plants alive, that's it.  

I don't grow these beasts for their fruit - that's just a bonus.  They're pretty, they're striking, and they mean business if you get too close to them.
If you have a couple of adults in your home though - they really can't be beat.  Bet they'd be even more fruitful/scarier bushes if you threw them in a south-facing window.  

This is how I got started: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1klxRnjZOI

Since then, I've started about ten plants, and each have 'taken'.   My friends think that I'm magic.  And no, I'm not.  I think if anyone wants something HUGE, SHOWY, and SPIKY, one should maybe try for one of these beauties.
 
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Avoid putting plants next to the router, if they are sensitive, young or small, I have noticed how the smallest/youngest die after a while, but in other places they grow really well.
 
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r ranson wrote:...The crazy thing is, the price of houseplants is through the roof right now.  I'm still looking for my aspidistra (it's on my bucket list to own one).  I found one this winter for $275.  It was looking like it was dying which is not a good sign on the one kind of plant that is nearly impossible to kill.  I keep on looking.
...


Sorry, I can't help you find an aspidistra.
How I 'find' houseplants: at plant swap days (like the one we organise once a year at the Community Graden) and I make more of the same by cutting and dividing the plants I already have (works very well with sansevieria and aloe). Maybe someone you know has an aspidistra and can divide it?
 
Be reasonable. You can't destroy everything. Where would you sit? How would you read a tiny ad?
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