• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Burra Maluca
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Miles Flansburg
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Dave Burton
  • Anne Miller
  • Daron Williams
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • James Freyr
  • Bryant RedHawk

hedge plants - for a living fence and coppicing or laying a hedge  RSS feed

 
gardener
Posts: 5224
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
659
books chicken dog duck fish forest garden fungi homestead hugelkultur hunting pig
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I am in the process of growing an Osage Orange living fence across the front of our property. When done it will be almost 1000 feet in length. I get the seeds from a tree that is by the road on the way to our property, set them out to stratify over the winter then separate the seeds and plant them 12 inches apart. Out of every three "apples" I get around 100 viable seeds. It is not really hard but is time consuming to separate the seeds from the stratified fruits, they become soft and easy to break open when they are ready for seed separation. The alternate method is to chop them into sections with a machete and plant in shallow ditches. Either method works.
 
steward
Posts: 5259
Location: Missoula, MT
874
books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur purity
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I ran across this hedge laying video "South of England Style" and thought it belonged here.



Oh, and this channel, Woodlands TV, has another one "Hedge Laying with bill hook:"



 
Posts: 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Great idea but lost in this is the avocation of using Russian Olive as a fence.  It is a non-native, heavy invader of wetlands to the point where it out competes all tree species.  I see this missing in a lot permaculture ideas -  a lack of understanding natural balance with native plant communities.
 
master steward
Posts: 12502
Location: Left Coast Canada
2398
books chicken fiber arts cooking sheep writing
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Thomas Adams wrote:
Great idea but lost in this is the avocation of using Russian Olive as a fence.  It is a non-native, heavy invader of wetlands to the point where it out competes all tree species.  I see this missing in a lot permaculture ideas -  a lack of understanding natural balance with native plant communities.



This thread might interest you, it's about native plants v. invasives in permaculture.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1793
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
93
  • Likes 3
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Thomas Adams wrote:
Great idea but lost in this is the avocation of using Russian Olive as a fence.  It is a non-native, heavy invader of wetlands to the point where it out competes all tree species.  I see this missing in a lot permaculture ideas -  a lack of understanding natural balance with native plant communities.



People keep talking about how invasive the Elaeagnus species are, but I just don't see it.  I have to take cuttings to propagate mine and I have never had a volunteer sprout up anywhere on my property.  
 
You can't expect to wield supreme executive power just because
Food Forest Card Game - Game Forum
https://permies.com/t/61704/Food-Forest-Card-Game-Game
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!