Win a copy of Compost Teas for the Organic Grower this week in the Composting forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
  • Joseph Lofthouse
stewards:
  • Mike Jay
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Devaka Cooray
garden masters:
  • Steve Thorn
  • Dave Burton
  • Dan Boone
gardeners:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Mandy Launchbury-Rainey
  • Mike Barkley

Buried Roofing Shingles

 
Posts: 4
Location: Southeast Missouri
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hello,

I'm new to the forum and this is my first post so of course, I'm nervous.

Just this past year we moved to a farm and the previous owner re-roofed the house and dumped the shingles in a pile and now the grass has grown up around the stash. We didn't find it until just recently.

My question is: is it best to uncover it and remove it or should we just leave it because it doesn't matter.

Thank you,
Sandy
 
Sandy Peterson
Posts: 4
Location: Southeast Missouri
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Oops! First mistake.

I put this in the wrong place and I don't know how to fix it.
 
gardener
Posts: 2351
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
153
forest garden trees urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Welcome and good questions!
I would get the shingles off your land if you can, they tend to be petroleum based and may leach crap into the soil.
Perhaps if you PM a Moderator they will move the thread.
 
Posts: 3366
Location: Kansas Zone 6a
37
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
What kind of shingles? Any guess how old they were? Is the area out of three way or were you planning some big garden for the spot?

Old asphalt shingles may contain asbestos. It is fine if contained, but dangerous if you start moving them and kicking up dust.

Grass is growing, that is a good sign. Minimal gick.

Mushrooms could break them down and suck up any heavy metals. Then you have a few buckets of toxic mushrooms to dispose of instead of tons of junk.
 
Sandy Peterson
Posts: 4
Location: Southeast Missouri
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thank you! We are going to check out the shingles this weekend.
 
gardener
Posts: 5964
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
891
hugelkultur dog forest garden duck fish fungi hunting books chicken writing homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It may be to your benefit to contact your state environmental protection agency, they might have help for your dilemma with the shingles. Since you didn't put them there, a call might possibly keep them from taking any actions against you should it be against state law/ regulation to bury shingles on land not designated as a land fill.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1703
Location: Western Washington
22
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
worms = better sign.

I hate that crap so much. The shingles stuff. They constantly shed weird chemically colored grains of 'sand'. I deal anyway. they definitely break down slow. I've been eating food grown near the rooftop downspout which washes tons of that into a nice little light pocket with no noticeable medium term effects.
 
Posts: 95
Location: KY
9
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Bryant RedHawk wrote:It may be to your benefit to contact your state environmental protection agency, they might have help for your dilemma with the shingles. Since you didn't put them there, a call might possibly keep them from taking any actions against you should it be against state law/ regulation to bury shingles on land not designated as a land fill.



I understand what you are saying, but I would be very careful here. The "department of make you sad" can find all kinds of ways to make things difficult once they show up and start digging around. Unless you have a personal contact in the agency, I would use a lot of caution calling a 1-800 number and reporting this. I am not saying not to contact an agency, just be very sure of what the law says and how it can and has been interpreted regarding the landowner.
 
Posts: 82
Location: Zone 9, CA
12
books urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm a roofer's wife, so I'll ask: Are they Wood Shingles, or Asphalt Shingles? It sounds as if everyone is assuming that they are Asphalt Shingles, which may be the case, but it's important (at least to me) to be clear.
 
Everybody! Do the Funky Monkey! Like this tiny ad!
Taylor&Zach’s Bootcamp Journey
https://permies.com/t/115886/permaculture-projects/Taylor-Zach-Bootcamp-Journey
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!