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Would like to here from anyone recycling or repurposing glass. I making paperweights out of glass melted from old bottles. I've collected over 5000 bottles from old dumps. I use a propane weed burner to melt and form and a wood fired annealing oven.
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That's a nice piece. I have used old bottles melted in a glass furnace to blow new objects, but never thought of using it the way you are.
 
garden master
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nice work!

a person could make arrowheads:



or a person can build a house:

 
pollinator
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Roberto Pokachinni : You might enjoy this variation on bottles in a cordwood wall, rob roy who is a prolific Writer on Owner built homes takes this idea One step

Further ! ////// See link below :





The Rob Roy version which favors paler clearer colored bottles uses an outside wrap of flashing or white plastic to transmit the greatest amount of light through his

Walls. Enjoy ! For the Good of the Craft ! Big AL
 
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For me, glass is primarily a disposal issue, since I haven't seen much that I would like to replicate, in the bottle glass category. I have used it effectively, to replace some of the gravel, when mixing concrete. Gravel is very inexpensive, so it's not about any cost savings. It's about not having a buildup of glass which  ends up mixed with soil in so many cases, if left lying about.

I have seen a few art glass items, made from recycled glass. Some of them are quite nice. But, when I look at the quantity of fuel burned, to turn a pound of glass into something useful or decorative, I always come back to the idea of just getting rid of it in concrete.
 
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Dale Hodgins wrote:For me, glass is primarily a disposal issue, since I haven't seen much that I would like to replicate, in the bottle glass category. I have used it effectively, to replace some of the gravel, when mixing concrete. Gravel is very inexpensive, so it's not about any cost savings. It's about not having a buildup of glass which  ends up mixed with soil in so many cases, if left lying about.

I have seen a few art glass items, made from recycled glass. Some of them are quite nice. But, when I look at the quantity of fuel burned, to turn a pound of glass into something useful or decorative, I always come back to the idea of just getting rid of it in concrete.



Someone had that bright idea in our house, they had filled the eves with concrete made with glass, it was lethal to remove it when we replaced the roof since there were sharp shards sticking out everywhere. when it broke into chunks it left sharp fragments of glass everywhere, and now I am stuck with it as I cannot take it to the recycling because it is a mixed material. be very careful where you use glass in concrete. All glass here goes to recycling. Most of the "recycled glass" things I have seen look hideous to me, I do fancy the counter tops, but that takes more equipment than we have.
 
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It strikes me that if someone were trying to optimize upcycling/recycling in their construction techniques, cobbing clear or light colored glass bottles in as windows in a cob structure would allow light into the building.

Alternately, It occurs to me that you could use a foot or so of glass bottles along the top of a foundation for a greenhouse/high tunnel structure (mortaring them in place) to increase the amount of low-angle light, which might be beneficial for winter growing. 
 
Dale Hodgins
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The video shows a guy cutting bottles. He is using a wet saw, which usually prevents glass particles from becoming airborne. I have been on many job sites, where this sort of saw is used. Sometimes, the material does become airborne. That's because people are foolish in disposing of the sludge that accumulates in the bottom of the water bath. If it's just dumped out on the ground, it will dry out, and be whipped around by the wind. The safest place to get rid of this, is in the footing or mixed with concrete.

The small particles of glass are very destructive to clothing. Sometimes the person doing the cutting, will continue to wear those clothes after they are dried out, so that that person is now shedding little particles of glass, wherever they go.

I have taken a similar bottle, and scored the cut line deeply. This usually allows the glass to snap in the right spot. The process is faster, once you get good at it, it doesn't require any power tools, and it doesn't create millions of little pieces of glass, to contaminate our lungs.
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