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Flue, exhaust transition or plenum, pictures needed.  RSS feed

 
Satamax Antone
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Location: Southern alps, on the French side of the french /italian border 5000ft high Southern alpine climate.
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Since it's a recurrent problem for newbs, to have a good flue transition.

I ask you to post pics of good ones you have seen, or used yourself.

Please, refrain on the words, just a quick description of the tricks used is sufficient.  So the thread is not getting drowned with babble and arguments.

Thanks a lot everybody.

 
thomas rubino
Posts: 816
Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
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My small bell plenum (transition area).
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barrel off for core rebuild, showing entrance to transition area
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looking down to the ash collection area
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looking thru clean out door, ash pit and start of horizontal pipe
 
Tom-Scott Gordon
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This is generally a gorgeous build out. What was wrong with the core? Does this heat an inner courtyard, and partially supply the home as well? --Transitional spaces particularly intrigue me because they inspire neighbors and help beat greedy landlords, realtors and utility companies out of a lot of bucks!
 
thomas rubino
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Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
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Tom; Read my post on spontaneous combustion, it explains the core rebuilds.  No this heats just our studio/greenhouse.
 
Ralf Siepmann
Posts: 21
Location: Northern Germany
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forest garden tiny house
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Good idea to make this thread!

Brief explanation: a rocket combustion unit on wheels and not much room at the back side of the barrel.
Idea: Intersecting the barrel with the flue pipe. Pipe runs tangential and opens where it cuts the barrel.
Advantages: bigger open space and less direction change of the exhaust gases compared to a 90 degree outlet. One of the side openings is the flue connection and the second is capped as clean-out.
Challenge: get the intersection cut to fit. Solved with an Excel template calculation sheet.
Pictures:

Printout of the actual intersection, according to theory:


Checking my math with cardboard tubes, you should get the idea by now:


Template cut out and layed on target area at the actual lower barrel part, 2" above floor for ash deposit space:


Tubes cut (jigsaw), matched, secured with screws and sealed with high-temp automotive silicone (lack of welding equipment):


Opening viewed through the exhaust/cleanout pipe:


Metal "manifold" with cutout for core:


Transition space viewed from the inside:


"Manifold" in place:


Being built in with cob mortar and perlite/clay insulation:


The finished heater is running its exhaust through bell bench in the 4th week now with no hassles.

 
thomas rubino
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Location: latitude 47 N.W. montana zone 6A
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Hi Ralf ;  All I can say is wow ! Nice work.
 
Satamax Antone
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Location: Southern alps, on the French side of the french /italian border 5000ft high Southern alpine climate.
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Nice one Ralf.

You're not the first one to use this arrangement. But i've only seen one before i think.

How much gap projection and edge length do you have, on top and sides of the transition?

Have you published your build elsewhere? It would be good to have a link to it.

Thanks for posting.
 
Ralf Siepmann
Posts: 21
Location: Northern Germany
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forest garden tiny house
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Thanks Thomas & Satamax !

There´s a guy with the nick Manuel over at Donkey's who had the same idea independently and uses it in his builds, but he cuts the pipes by eyeball, which is ok when he cobs them in.
Cutout template rolled around the barrel is 44 cm / 17.5 "  wide and 15 cm/  6" (system size) high, circumference/edge length approx 1 meter / 3.3 feet.
More important to me was the intersection depth that is 11 cm / 4 1/3 " (depth 0 means tubes touch but do not intersect).

The nicest thing about this I discovered: when you open the cleanout you can see straight through to the bench entrance an clean super easy if necessary.
And since the combustion unit is mobile you can hook up the thermal battery left or right depending on where you install it.

The build sequence isn´t published yet, I plan to do so here and at Donkey's, but it will take some time. I want to run the stove for some time and get used to fire it under all atmospheric conditions before I declare success.
Here´s a pic of the finished unit. Flue pipe ends sticking out behind the barrel to the left and right not visible here:


 
lesley verbrugge
Posts: 43
Location: 48°N in Normandie, France. USDA 8-9 Koppen Cfb
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bee chicken food preservation forest garden hugelkultur solar
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Flue transition in hardware cloth (1/4" wire mesh) clad with clay sand mix.
6" X 19" rectangle cut out of bottom of barrel,  tin snipped curved surface to further 1" and splayed the tabs out, and bent out the two side strips. This gave me something solid to offer the mesh up to. The mesh was left as a single piece where it joined the barrel and bent over and shoved into the clay each side I then snipped along the length towards the barrel (twice). This let me curve it downwards towards the flue overlapping where needed. Extra mesh added to make the final connection to flue

Thanks for the thanks Antoine. It's a pleasure to help! I found the transition the hardest part of the build, so I'm sure others will find your post really useful.
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lesley verbrugge
Posts: 43
Location: 48°N in Normandie, France. USDA 8-9 Koppen Cfb
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bee chicken food preservation forest garden hugelkultur solar
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Beginning to cover mesh of manifold with clay where it butts up to barrel.  The cover cap at the bottom is on a short length of flue that leads to manifold, for clean out access. As the manifold took shape, I added more wire mesh overlapping it to get me to the flue pipe. I tried to add clay layer to inside the manifold but bits of that fell in. Smoothed a bit more in, but gave up and added more clay on the topside. Seems to be holding fine.

2015 ready to fire

2016 cosmetic changes made and three coats of lime wash. Bench still not finished, but needed the heat! One of the pluses of using natural materials is that you can mend/change things easily. One house brick used in the feed tube (spanning the opening to the oven)had cracked so replaced with a firebrick, and added some decoration, last summer,
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Satamax Antone
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Location: Southern alps, on the French side of the french /italian border 5000ft high Southern alpine climate.
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Thanks a lot Lesley.
 
Dave Lot
Posts: 117
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Here is the transition of my 6 inch rocket.

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Dave Lot
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Then I raised the outer barrel up a bit, and you can see the black area where the hot gasses flow . . .
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Dave Lot
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And final result . . .
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Gerry Parent
Posts: 11
Location: Penticton, Canada
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Here is my stove after about 3 months of burning every day. As you can see, there is a lot of ash accumulation out of reach from the cleanout port which is why I normally lift my barrel and clean it about twice a season. I may move the cleanout port to help solve this problem however, it also gives me a peek 'under the hood' to inspect the riser (clean the top of the riser) and repair any cracks or other weakening points if needed. Of course ash accumulation varies with what type of wood your burning, if you burn any paper products and of course operator/stove personalities....The only place I can think of that a small amount of ash accumulation is beneficial in this area would be to help form a seal where the bottom of the barrel rests on the cob/brick support.

It seems logical that the more smooth you make all of the 'innards' of your stove the less surface area for the ash to catch on and accumulate. On mine, I surrounded my heat riser with sheet metal which stands up quite well and easy to clean.
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Gerry Parent
Posts: 11
Location: Penticton, Canada
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A few more pics of the manifold area
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Satamax Antone
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Location: Southern alps, on the French side of the french /italian border 5000ft high Southern alpine climate.
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Thanksalot Gerry!

I love the offset barrel and big plenum.
 
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