• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

non perishable products?  RSS feed

 
r ranson
master steward
Posts: 5468
Location: Left Coast Canada
661
books chicken tiny house
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
When I tried selling produce from my garden, the one thing I didn't like was the tremendous amount of waste at the end of the day.  My chickens loved it, but it made me sad. 

Let's brainstorm some ideas we can grow for non-perishable products.  Since the laws here are pretty draconian (we can dry a product, but things like cooking or smoking are really difficult without government approved and inspected facilities), let's talk about things we can grow and sell that require minimal processing.

I'll start:
Dry pulses
Dry spicy peppers
textiles (washed and carded wool from heritage breeds is a top seller in the local market).

What other ideas can you think of?
 
Su Ba
pollinator
Posts: 940
Location: Big Island, Hawaii (2300' elevation, 60" avg. annual rainfall, temp range 55-80 degrees F)
113
books forest garden rabbit solar tiny house woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Where I live, anything processed is heavily regulated. Even cutting a large head of cauliflower in half is forbidden! While vendors constantly offer forbidden items, eyes have to be alert for the health inspector. To legally sell even dried herbs, a vendor has to jump through hoops.
Content minimized. Click to view
 
Mike Jay
Posts: 535
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
26
books cat food preservation hunting solar trees woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Winter squash - If they don't sell, just bring them back next time

Jam/jelly/pickles - Our laws are draconian too except for high acid canned food or maple syrup

Maple syrup

We're really small but we base our canning around post market days.  If tomatoes don't sell, we juice them and keep the juice in the fridge.  3-4 days later we harvest more tomatoes and can them all up then.
 
r ranson
master steward
Posts: 5468
Location: Left Coast Canada
661
books chicken tiny house
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Great list Mike.

Jams/jelly/pickles are considered 'processed' and require a special certification to make here.  But I don't think Maple syrup is - mostly because it's 'impossible' to make it here as we don't have sugar maples.  What they don't know is that the Great Leaf maples make the most amazing maple syrup which tastes like it already has real butter in it. 

Love the idea of winter squash. 
 
Mike Jay
Posts: 535
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
26
books cat food preservation hunting solar trees woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Just thought of another one...  Popcorn
 
Tracy Wandling
steward
Posts: 1568
Location: Cortes Island, British Columbia. Zone: 8ish Lat: 50; Rainfall: 50" ish; sand and rocks; well water
286
bee books chicken forest garden fungi hugelkultur trees
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Garlic and onion braids! I hope to do these next year.

I'm also planning to grow corn appropriate for making flour and cornmeal. So, selling the dried kernels for milling.

I'm going to try quinoa and amaranth, but unless I can create a way for threshing, it will not be cost/time effective.

The laws allow for things like dry pasta - so I'll be working on some gluten-free pasta recipes using corn, and quinoa/amaranth flour.

I'll try to think of some more!. Great idea for a thread!

 
Zach Loeks
author
Posts: 25
Location: Cobden, ON
2
bee solar trees
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi,

Great question!

I think one of the best is to simply have a good cellar or cold storage so you can hold fresh products longer since they demand the higher price, don't require extra inputs, and they are in high demand.

A fridge, an insulate room with a coolbot unit or a rootcellar with ice can effectively help your storage capacity in summer and winter.

otherwise sauerkraut is very cost effective.

🌿Zach


IMG_5069.JPG
[Thumbnail for IMG_5069.JPG]
 
Joseph Lofthouse
garden master
Posts: 2432
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
443
bee chicken food preservation fungi greening the desert
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
honey
beeswax
Leaf cutter or mason bee cocoons
canes and other sticks
dried flowers
dried herbs
fiber flax
mushroom spores
seeds for eating: beans, corn, pumpkin seeds, sunflowers, mustard seeds, fennel seeds, flax, wheat.
Birdseed blends
Covercrop seeds
wildflower seeds
Walnuts
hazelnuts
raisins
Vegetable seeds for planting
storage onions/garlic
Winter squash and decorative pumpkins
Potted plants are perishable, but it might take a month for them to outgrow their containers...  It might take 6 months.

I think of myself as a plant breeder, so about half of what I grow is donated to a food pantry that I operate, or to other local food pantries. I don't mind feeding worms or birds, but I prefer to do so only if I haven't put in the labor to harvest something.

And there are various levels of perishable... Some root crops I might be able to take to market several weeks in a row and have them maintain good quality. I can pick them days ahead of market. Strawberries pretty much have to be picked in the morning.


 
Michael Heath
Posts: 9
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Herbal teas - Red clover blossoms, mints, chamomile, strawberry leaf, raspberry leaf, pine needle(haven't tried this one yet).  Go down the tea aisle in your local health food store and take notes.
Dried herbs - or fresh herbs for that matter, if they don't sell, next time they'll be dried herbs.

Michael Heath

Go ahead and imitate someone you admire.  But the minute you fail in that imitation, you advance another step on the journey of finding yourself - Michael Heath (c8
 
Amit Enventres
Posts: 433
Location: Ohio, USA
28
dog fish food preservation forest garden fungi solar trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Many fruit will last a while either on the tree, in cold storage, or room temperature. I even have some tomatoes looking decent from last summer hanging neglected in the basement (3 months). They taste bitter but I think that's a lack of sunlight.
Now, greens get real floppy fast, unless under constant misting and cool air. But, you could do microgreens, then the next week BABY lettuce, then two weeks later... If you keep them in soil and cut on site...Maybe?
 
Judith Browning
Posts: 5772
Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
338
bike chicken fungi trees urban woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I don't think I saw these listed above...

luffa sponges
all sorts of gourds
homemade cloth produce bags


I loved selling both braids and individual bulbs of garlic...once cured both would be salable the whole market season.

 
Joe DiMeglio
Posts: 47
Location: Tucson, AZ Zone 9A/9B
8
forest garden fungi greening the desert tiny house trees wofati
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator


Strings or bags of dried and /or smoked mushrooms.  Great for soups, stews, pizza, salad, stir fry, eggs, etc. All dried food is good for backpackers too. Lightweight and tasty. Niche market.

Fruit leather or snacks, dried fruit slices -  candied w/ honey or not.

Nut, grain and honey/molasses/maple syrup/agave syrup sweet root/Yacon syrup (Diabetic friendly) bars

Sweet Root/Yacon syrup (it's cooked though) or sweet root plant starts for diabetics to make a sweetener that actually helps regulate blood sugar. Dried Yacon is also an option. Powdered?

Veggie Pemican bars - without the rendered fat or meat - Dried fruit puree with crushed nuts, honey and grains mixed in - energy bars basically.

Dried spices - lavender, basil oregano, etc.-  lots of applications.

Sundried tomatoes, Sundried onion rings maybe. Spiced (dry rub), smoked and dried eggplant slices - about 1/2 inch thick to start with - tastes a lot like meat.



In the Southwest, dried Cholla cactus skeleton pieces - rub with ashes to make a silver/grey weathered look, sand for a pink/salmon finish or leave natural.  Can make all kinds of crafts from them - LED lamps, flower arrangements, humming bird feeders, bird houses, etc.

Dried Saguaro cactus ribs or boots.

Dried cactus fruit

Dried chilies in braids or not.   chiltipenes. 

Cheesecloth caches of Creosote, bursage and other leaves - spray with water for that desert rain smell - amazing air freshener.  Would probably work as a hanging closet cache for moth/bug repellent too.


Marketing Ideas -

A little B/W flyer with recipes can be a good marketing tool and give folks ideas that may not have thought of for your WEIRD products.  LOL

In summer, buy a hand pumped bug spray sprayer and fill with ice water and some mint essential oil or crushed mint leaves/lemon peels in a bag and mist your customers - very refreshing and memorable, draws the kids, which draws the parents.  I did this working for a mint farm selling essential oils at farmers markets here in Tucson and it worked really well. Makes people feel uplifted and positive which helps sales. I was amazed at the effect.

  Good Luck at the Market y'all!
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!