Win a copy of Permaculture Design Companion this week in the Permaculture Design forum!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
stewards:
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Mike Jay Haasl
  • Burra Maluca
garden masters:
  • James Freyr
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Steve Thorn
  • Greg Martin
gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • Dave Burton
  • Pearl Sutton

tree identification

 
Posts: 11
Location: Ontario, Canada
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can someone please help me ID this tree?
Very grey bark, wood is rich brown color (ie not light like ash) and there are cones and buds.
Bark.jpg
[Thumbnail for Bark.jpg]
ConeNearBud.jpg
[Thumbnail for ConeNearBud.jpg]
ConesAndBud.jpg
[Thumbnail for ConesAndBud.jpg]
ConesBud2.jpg
[Thumbnail for ConesBud2.jpg]
Stump.jpg
[Thumbnail for Stump.jpg]
 
Mother Tree
Posts: 11066
Location: Portugal
1703
dog duck forest garden tiny house books wofati bike bee solar rocket stoves greening the desert
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Could it be alder?
 
Posts: 327
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b) Rainfall 26"
50
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Alder, not larch.  The buds are breaking into leaves not needles, and the "cones" are catkins.  You may find old cones from last year as well, they tend to hang on to them so you get this year's and last year's at the same time.  The bark is also deeply fissured rather than flaky in layers like most conifers tend to have. Couldn't say the species.
 
Posts: 87
Location: Long Island, NY
10
hugelkultur forest garden food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Definitely looks like Alder to me. They have catkins like birch, but they present more like a hops flower.
 
Posts: 138
Location: Campton, New Hampshire
9
forest garden hunting trees tiny house food preservation woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Those are definitely catkins, which means it's either an alder or a birch. Birch usually (but not always) has smooth bark, so I'll go with alder as well.
 
Posts: 20
Location: the mountains of western nc
1
forest garden trees food preservation
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Late response and all, but do you have an update pic?  The leafscars look like walnut to me, the 'catkins' look like early flowers from same. Would explain wood color, too.
 
Posts: 48
Location: FEMA District III
12
duck forest garden chicken
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
The bark is what is throwing me for a loop.  The young branches look like Alnus incana (Gray Alder) but then when I see the older trunk, that throw that tree out of the mix. The gray and deep furrows with catkins. Hmmm...  

Can you describe to me the site?

There is a chance it's a hybrid. Alnus genus likes to hybridize.  

 
Posts: 175
14
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I disagree, I think that is a butternut tree
 
Posts: 92
Location: Göteborg Sweden
2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
To be honest I'm thinking some type of willow. The trunk looks almost cottonwood, which would rule out alder or birch for me. Plus the calkins don't look like the small cones of alder. But I'm not overly familiar with Canadian trees. Alder cones generally come in bunches and look like this image below.




 
Posts: 48
Location: South/Southwestern Finland
8
hugelkultur trees urban
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Most likely some sort of walnut. The cones are premature catkins, and the leaf scar is quite unique, pointing to walnuts.
http://www.treetopics.com/juglans_cinerea/butternut_9404crop1-320.png

http://www.bobklips.com/BOBS_WEBSITE/JUGLCINE-twig-czm-27Dec08-D.jpg

if there is a "mustache" on top of the leaf scar, then it points to Juglans cinerea , aka butternut.

-Janne
 
Make yourself as serene as a flower, as a tree. And on wednesdays, as serene as this tiny ad:
dry stack step
https://permies.com/t/125100/dry-stack-step
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!