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What is the maximum temperature tolerance for these herbs?

 
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My husband bought a 4 pack of herb seedlings today, being Italian Parsley, Sage, Oregano and Basil. One problem I find with googling plant care is frequently the care guide will not mention temperature tolerance, only amount of sunlight which can be an entirely different thing. We're in sub-tropical Australia and just coming into spring/summer. Daytime is already very hot (25c+) so we need to be careful how we care for these herbs. The biggest problem is while we have an air conditioned home with lots of windows, none of them really give full sun (good for us in the heat but not so much for plants), so our options are basically full sun in high temperatures (outdoors) or low temperatures and little sun (indoors). Can all of these herbs survive here in some way?
 
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Location: Pennsylvania, Dauphin County
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This video might help.  Its not just about the temperature but also the humidity.

starting indoors
Video on sprouting indoors, very good.

Another excellent video a bit different, step by step
Great seed starting instructional video
 
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Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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Those will do well in dappled shade up to 100 f, you do need to add trays of water for humidity right around them though (tray with gravel and water works wonders).
 
L. Barry
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Thanks for the replies. I looked up each one individually. One of them, basil, can handle up to 35c in full sun so I've put that with the bell peppers. These two plants are the only ones I've found so far that can take the heat and full sun all day. Everything else withers within half an hour, so we've had to be really careful. Parsley (I think) comes second for temperature tolerance, up to 30C. The other two can only tolerate 20-25C so they definitely need to be indoors. The difficult part is providing enough sun indoors. Some of our windows get maybe 2 hours sunlight in the morning but that's it.
 
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Location: South Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)
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I live in the sunniest (most full sun hours per year) place in Europe. We usually get to high 30s or 40C, most I've seen is 45C. Basil does fine in full sun. Obviously on the hot days it needs water. I've never grown the other 3 but friends here grow oregano and I've not heard of any problems.
 
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Location: Fairplay, Northern California
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I grow sage, parsley, and oregano in full sun in very hot California summers, where we had temperatures in the high 90 degrees F.--low 30's Celsius-- up to 103 and 104 F. for a few days--39 and 40 C.

Parsley is likely to go to seed quickly in hot weather but it will certainly survive.  When your cool weather returns it may put out some fresh leaves for your kitchen.

Oregano never suffers in the heat.  Sage is only a little less tough.
 
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