• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies living kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education experiences global resources the cider press projects digital market permies.com all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • raven ranson
  • paul wheaton
  • Jocelyn Campbell
  • Julia Winter
stewards:
  • Burra Maluca
  • Devaka Cooray
  • Bill Erickson
garden masters:
  • Joylynn Hardesty
  • Bryant RedHawk
  • Mike Jay
gardeners:
  • Joseph Lofthouse
  • Dan Boone
  • Daron Williams

are jerusalem artichokes good for bees?  RSS feed

 
Posts: 42
Location: nacogdoches,texas
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Which variety of Jerusalem artichokes are best for bees?In fact are Jerusalem artichokes good for bees?Where is the best place to buy tubers?
 
pollinator
Posts: 1793
Location: Wisconsin, zone 4
92
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My JA don't flower until very late in the year, late Sept or early Oct, and the bees don't really seem to pay any attention to it.  You can buy it from our very own Joseph Lofthouse.
 
pollinator
Posts: 4339
Location: Anjou ,France
240
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Here in northern France they rarly flower at all . So for the bees nothing

David
 
pollinator
Posts: 468
Location: 6a
60
dog forest garden hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
All of the sunflower family including the Jerusalem Artichoke are good for predatory bugs.  Predatory micro-wasps, beneficial flys, ladybugs and of course the Carolina mantis as they like anything with a bug on it.   I just planted them this year and it was late so I didn't get any blooms .  I think the deer ate the tops off of them so I can not attest to pollinators.   Some of the organic websites say that goldfinch, bees, and butterflys like them.
 
pollinator
Posts: 643
Location: northwest Missouri, USA
54
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mine didn't flower until late Sept. and early Oct. and those blossoms only lasted about a week. I see JA as a better resource for other purposes, not so much for pollinators. My chickens love the tubers.
 
gardener
Posts: 3467
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
806
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

I don't see honeybees on sunroot flowers.

2012-09-0023.jpg
[Thumbnail for 2012-09-0023.jpg]
sunroot flowers
 
Scott Foster
pollinator
Posts: 468
Location: 6a
60
dog forest garden hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Joseph Lofthouse wrote:
I don't see honeybees on sunroot flowers.



Are you doing seeds this year?   I live in NW New Jersey on the New York, Pennsylvania boarder....wondering if you'll have any good seeds for this area.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
gardener
Posts: 3467
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
806
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Scott Foster wrote:Are you doing seeds this year?   I live in NW New Jersey on the New York, Pennsylvania boarder....wondering if you'll have any good seeds for this area.



The sunroot flowers look like they got frozen prematurely this year. I still went through the motions of collecting the seed heads. They are still drying. I expect to thresh them in a few weeks, so will have a better idea then.

I have a lot of semi-improved feral pollinated sunroot seeds. I don't recommend them for eating, only for naturalization, decorative flowers, or breeding projects.

I am currently digging the genetically diverse landrace tubers, and am selling a box of mixed varieties for $15.

If seeds become available, I'll add them to my seed list. A link to it is in the signature of this post.
 
Posts: 89
Location: Oakland, CA
2
chicken fungi trees
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I grow dwarf sunray sunchoke and it matures early and flowers consistently.  Insects do visit, I'm pretty sure I have seem bees on them.  My problem is they are so early if I forget to pull them out of the ground they tend to rot. So I pull them out and store them in the fridge
 
Scott Foster
pollinator
Posts: 468
Location: 6a
60
dog forest garden hugelkultur trees woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Joseph Lofthouse wrote:

Scott Foster wrote:Are you doing seeds this year?   I live in NW New Jersey on the New York, Pennsylvania boarder....wondering if you'll have any good seeds for this area.



The sunroot flowers look like they got frozen prematurely this year. I still went through the motions of collecting the seed heads. They are still drying. I expect to thresh them in a few weeks, so will have a better idea then.

I have a lot of semi-improved feral pollinated sunroot seeds. I don't recommend them for eating, only for naturalization, decorative flowers, or breeding projects.

I am currently digging the genetically diverse landrace tubers, and am selling a box of mixed varieties for $15.

If seeds become available, I'll add them to my seed list. A link to it is in the signature of this post.




I was looking at your Landrace link, probably not going to be hardy in my area,..looks like you may be in high-desert.  Not sure.   How are you breeding for diversity...this is something I would dedicate an area to.

Regards, Scott
 
Joseph Lofthouse
gardener
Posts: 3467
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
806
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator

Scott Foster wrote:I was looking at your Landrace link, probably not going to be hardy in my area,..looks like you may be in high-desert.  Not sure.   How are you breeding for diversity...this is something I would dedicate an area to.



I'm two USDA hardiness zones colder than you....

My breeding project originally consisted of growing feral sunroot seeds from Kansas. And selecting for best growth and productivity, to come up with a semi-improved strain. Then crossing that strain with a domestic sunroot variety. Then I reselected for good culinary and agronomic traits. Then crossed the best of the best.

The thing about breeding sunroots, is that I have to plant the new seedlings in an area that has never had sunroots before, so I can tell the difference between new seedlings, and old strains. So the sunroot weeds proliferate, and I never quite get rid of them in the areas where they grew previously.
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I live in Portland OR, I have 3 varieties and none of them flower that much so at least here they're not a good bee plant.

 
Posts: 59
Location: North Carolina
7
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My sunroot are usually visited by eastern carpenter bee (Xylocopa virginica) and a local green sweat bee (Agapostemon species), in addition to a number of butterfly species I can't identify.

I've never seen domestic honeybee on sunroot.
 
I wish to win the lottery. I wish for a lovely piece of pie. And I wish for a tiny ad:
five days of natural building (wofati and cob) and rocket cooktop oct 8-12, 2018
https://permies.com/t/92034/permaculture-projects/days-natural-building-wofati-cob
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!