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Pics from Greg's Forest Garden

 
gardener
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Location: Maine, zone 5
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forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
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Ed Waters wrote:Greg, was wondering if you ever offer tours of your Forest Garden.

Ed



Not formal tours as I don't yet think of it as tour worthy, but sometimes folks drop by for other reasons and then I take them for a walk/talk if they are interested.  It seems to usually happen after biochar hands on meetup sessions.  I have a few scheduled this year, but so far not at my home.  If you're interested and are down in York county sometime in the spring through fall and we can make it work then you're invited!
 
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We are going to be way up north in the Eastport region.   'Would enjoy seeing it up close.  We grow a lot of what you are showing and will be taking a lot of cuttings next week to take along with us when we move in March.  This is absolutely killing us and just beginning to realize how much we will be leaving behind after 15 years.  Willows, aronias, sorrel etc can move no problem, English walnuts, hardy kiwis, siberian pea shrubs etc, are difficult to maybe impossible.  Even ramps if they don't show themselves will be difficult to find.

Can we bring red currants?  Black currants seem to be a no no, but reds are allowed in some counties??

My email is edm6103@gmail.com

 
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greg if its not too much trouble i would still love a planting list of whats on your property
 
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Hi Greg. Fantastic pics.  I’m in North Idaho and am working on a design which incorporates a number of the plants and berries you have. .  I’d really love to pick your brain for some suggestions for my food forest. I have commercial aspirations for value-added berry products and I’m looking for info from an experienced gardener.  I’m in zone 6 but I’m planning for 4.  I want to choose plants with relatively fast fruiting and high yield.  Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Jeff
 
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Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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just popping in to say that my sweet cicely seed from you is beginning to come up!...they are the ones I planted in a big pot last fall and left out all winter...I still have the rest to plant soon.

This is one of my favorite threads...beautiful and inspiring journal
 
Greg Martin
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Aww, thanks Judith!  So very happy to have something from my food forest popping up for yours.  They self seed for me easily in my moist soils and jump around a bit.
 
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Location: Northern Maine, USA (zone 3b-4a)
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Greg Martin wrote:An update on the American Spikenard.  It's such a big plant that makes sooo many berries.  Each little cluster ripens all at once, but the spike of berries ripen over an extended time.  They've passed now, but these are pictures from a few weeks ago when I was snacking on them.

I've got this plant combining this spring as well as a few others. got another hardy mulberry, a couple more honey berries and a few more red/ white currants. growing out some herbs to put out there as well. going to spread out my arctic raspberries and alpine strawberries to speed up their spread in my wood chips under my bigger plants. can't wait to see ground again!
 
Greg Martin
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I picked up some red leafed peach seeds from the Experimental Farm Network this year and wanted to share with you all how lovely they are!  They are supposed to make tasty small peaches.  They have great potential to be beautiful trees in the landscape, but I think they are more of a Merlot leafed peach.

Red-Leaf-Peach.jpg
Red Leaf Peach from the Experimental Farm Network
Red Leaf Peach from the Experimental Farm Network
 
Greg Martin
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Last year I planted a couple of giant ornamental onions, Gladiator to the left and Mount Everest to the right in front of a goumi seedling.  I planted them because I've heard that they are bred from wild onions that are foraged for.  I was curious if I would like the bulbs, but with their large wide leaves I was also curious how those might taste.  So when I walked past them both I decided to take a nibble.  I can tell they are alliums, but I was shocked by how very mild the leaves were on both plants.  The Mount Everest leaves somehow even reminded me a bit of cabbage....???  I will be experimenting more with these leaves as they get larger.

giant-ornamental-onions-gladiator-and-mount-everest-in-front-of-goumi-seedling.jpg
Giant ornamental onions coming up...Gladiator on the left, Mount Everest on the right. The stick behind them is a seedling Goumi
Giant ornamental onions coming up...Gladiator on the left, Mount Everest on the right. The stick behind them is a seedling Goumi
 
Greg Martin
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I also had to take a picture of the cornelian cherries, Cornus mas, in blossom.  Very lovely this time of year.

Cornus-mas-trees-flowering.jpg
Cornelian cherries blooming
Cornelian cherries blooming
 
steve bossie
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i have a wild chokecherry that has purple leaves on my property. i potted up some volunteers if your interested. new growth is green but turns purple by july.
 
Greg Martin
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steve bossie wrote:i have a wild chokecherry that has purple leaves on my property. i potted up some volunteers if your interested. new growth is green but turns purple by july.



Thank you Steve, sounds very nice.  I would be interested.  PM sent.  Have you ever run across the Robert chokecherry?  It has red leaves and grape sized fruit.  I think it's only in Canada, but I would very much love to get one or else seeds from one if anyone knows how I could get some.  Here's a picture of Robert chokecherry.

 
steve bossie
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mines surviving under my red pines so its never produced cherries but the ones in full sun nearby produce heavily so once this one is in full sun it should produce well. i make chokecherry jam every summer.
 
steve bossie
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Greg Martin wrote:

steve bossie wrote:i have a wild chokecherry that has purple leaves on my property. i potted up some volunteers if your interested. new growth is green but turns purple by july.



Thank you Steve, sounds very nice.  I would be interested.  PM sent.  Have you ever run across the Robert chokecherry?  It has red leaves and grape sized fruit.  I think it's only in Canada, but I would very much love to get one or else seeds from one if anyone knows how I could get some.  Here's a picture of Robert chokecherry.

never hears of it. would be nice to have it here. ever hear of rabina mountain ash?. its berries are much bigger and sweeter than reg. mountain ash. i think its from russia.
 
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Greg Martin wrote:

rick jacobson wrote: Hi, as a fellow Mainiac I would love to trade some fig cuttings from that German fig for something you might need/desire. Just a thought. I'm  in central Maine most of the time but escape the worst of the snow in N. C.



Hello fellow Mainiac Rick!  My collection is difficult to access right now as it's tucked away for the winter, but in the spring when I do the fig shuffle I should be able to find it and see if I can sneak a cutting off (though it's fairly small and I need to reproduce it a little to make backups for experiments here).  Drop me a reminder in the spring and I'll let you know if I can do it then or if we might need to wait until the fall for more growth.  
Hi Greg , technically it's spring but with the ice storms and snow squalls you wouldn't guess it!  Just wondering if you have gotten that super hardy German fig revived yet?  There is absolutely no rush, just touching base  like you asked me to do last fall .what is on your wish list for new plants to try out?
 
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This is incredibly inspiring. You have so much going on for such a Northern Climate - it gives me hope for the future.

Your pink-flowered raspberry looks like a thimbleberry. We get those growing wild around here on the West Coast and they're one of my favourite fresh fruits.
 
I knew that guy would be trouble! Thanks tiny ad!
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