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Pics from Greg's Forest Garden

 
Posts: 618
Location: Northern Maine, USA (zone 3b-4a)
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Greg Martin wrote:They have lovely little flowers too!  This one is the cultivar 'Eastern Prince' which I got from One Green World.  Generally for schisandra you need a male vine to pollinate the female vines, but Eastern Prince is self fertile.  I haven't tried to germinate the seeds yet as I keep cooking them all :)

i have one as well its slow to establish but took off finally this summer. how long before yours fruited?
 
steve bossie
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Greg Martin wrote:Last year I planted a couple of giant ornamental onions, Gladiator to the left and Mount Everest to the right in front of a goumi seedling.  I planted them because I've heard that they are bred from wild onions that are foraged for.  I was curious if I would like the bulbs, but with their large wide leaves I was also curious how those might taste.  So when I walked past them both I decided to take a nibble.  I can tell they are alliums, but I was shocked by how very mild the leaves were on both plants.  The Mount Everest leaves somehow even reminded me a bit of cabbage....???  I will be experimenting more with these leaves as they get larger.

i added Egyptian walking onions under my cherries last summer . anxious to see how well they spread.
 
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Location: Maine, zone 5
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steve bossie wrote:

Greg Martin wrote:They have lovely little flowers too!  This one is the cultivar 'Eastern Prince' which I got from One Green World.  Generally for schisandra you need a male vine to pollinate the female vines, but Eastern Prince is self fertile.  I haven't tried to germinate the seeds yet as I keep cooking them all :)

i have one as well its slow to establish but took off finally this summer. how long before yours fruited?


I didn't take any notes on this one so I'm just guessing....maybe fruit on the 3rd year.
 
Greg Martin
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steve bossie wrote:

Greg Martin wrote:Last year I planted a couple of giant ornamental onions, Gladiator to the left and Mount Everest to the right in front of a goumi seedling.  I planted them because I've heard that they are bred from wild onions that are foraged for.  I was curious if I would like the bulbs, but with their large wide leaves I was also curious how those might taste.  So when I walked past them both I decided to take a nibble.  I can tell they are alliums, but I was shocked by how very mild the leaves were on both plants.  The Mount Everest leaves somehow even reminded me a bit of cabbage....???  I will be experimenting more with these leaves as they get larger.

i added Egyptian walking onions under my cherries last summer . anxious to see how well they spread.


I suspect they'll spread great for you Steve.  I usually grab the top sets and move them around to where I want them to expand into.  They are quick growers.
 
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