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Duck allergy!!!

 
pollinator
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Okay, so we got 20 ducks last year for the first time ever. We've had chickens for 25 years, but never ducks. I was so looking forward to their eggs because everyone says they are great for baking and are super rich. They are now a year old (although we lost 2 to predation along the way) and producing eggs like crazy. The problem is that it turns out I am allergic to duck eggs! Who knew? I'd never eaten one in my life until last fall when our ducks began laying. After twice eating them and then spending the rest of the day alternating between severe projectile vomiting (yuk!) and more or less camping in the bathroom (plus fever, cramps and generally feeling like I had a severe case of the flu coupled with an asthma attack and near heart attack!) I finally had to concede that it was the eggs. Since then, I've found that I can't even go near the duck yard (especially their nest boxes) without getting a headache and shortness of breath. My husband has totally taken over the chore of feeding them and gathering eggs, etc. but I can't even cook them for the dogs without his having to scrub them first. Even then, I have to wear rubber gloves to handle them. Anyone else here allergic to duck eggs (and the ducks themselves apparently--at least their feces )? What should I do? We're vegetarians and only have ducks and chickens for their eggs, so I don't want to give them to someone who will kill them. Anyone know someone who would like ducks as pets and for their eggs who would keep them for life (their NATURAL life)?
 
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Sooooo strange never heard of that Deb. What kind of ducks? It couldn't be anything to do with the area they are in or what they are eating? I'm really curious as to the difference in the duck vs. the chicken that would make you react. Hmmmmmm
 
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been a professional cook for 23 years--have never, ever heard of this.  There is certainly well documented illness of poultry CAFO workers getting lung diseases, exposure to ammonia, fecal dust. Also plenty of dirt on stockyard industry, the cattle, the feeders. But never a diner, sorry.
 
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Hmmmm, the only thing I can think of is that ducks poop on their eggs a bunch more than chickens do. Perhaps the first time you washed the eggs, you didn't use hot water or somehow some feces got into the eggs. Perhaps it's some sort of microorganism in the duck poop that messes with you? That would explain why even going near their house would mess with you.

The only thing I can think of is, have you tried fermenting their feed? Perhaps that would change the bacteria/fungi in their feces and it wouldn't aggravate you?
 
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Allergic reactions to eggs are common enough that Utah's new food freedom legislation requires a warning label on foods that are prepared in the same kitchen as eggs.

I suppose that we don't hear much about duck egg allergies, because they are eaten so infrequently by so few people.
Duck Allergy: An Introduction
 
Deb Stephens
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s wesley wrote:Sooooo strange never heard of that Deb. What kind of ducks? It couldn't be anything to do with the area they are in or what they are eating? I'm really curious as to the difference in the duck vs. the chicken that would make you react. Hmmmmmm



The ducks are Khaki Campbells, Cayugas, Rouens and Appleyards, but I don't think it has anything to do with their feed or where they are at because we have had chickens in that same area for almost 20 years, and I eat chicken eggs with no problems.  They also eat the same food--including fresh greens from our garden every day. I do know that people who are allergic to chicken eggs can often eat duck eggs with no problem because the proteins are different.

Nicole Alderman wrote:Hmmmm, the only thing I can think of is that ducks poop on their eggs a bunch more than chickens do. Perhaps the first time you washed the eggs, you didn't use hot water or somehow some feces got into the eggs. Perhaps it's some sort of microorganism in the duck poop that messes with you? That would explain why even going near their house would mess with you.

The only thing I can think of is, have you tried fermenting their feed? Perhaps that would change the bacteria/fungi in their feces and it wouldn't aggravate you?



Apparently, it is the proteins in the eggs that I am allergic to and since their feces also contains proteins specific to ducks, that would explain why even just touching the eggs can start me feeling like I can't breathe. Considering how little it takes to make me feel like I may be about to go into anaphylaxis, I don't really want to experiment with eating them at all. The last time, I really felt like I was going to die! It was not fun and I almost went to the hospital. The only reason I didn't is that I am one of those stubborn types who would pretty much have to have a leg cut off or something similar to send me to a doctor.


Joseph Lofthouse wrote:Allergic reactions to eggs are common enough that Utah's new food freedom legislation requires a warning label on foods that are prepared in the same kitchen as eggs.



I think I read somewhere that eggs are the 8th most common food allergy--especially among kids. Duck egg allergies are relatively rare (it's usually chicken eggs) but naturally, I have to be one of the few who has it! It really bums me out because I was looking forward to them for so long.



At any rate, I guess I didn't make my original post very clear. What I am really interested in is finding a home for our poor ducks--it isn't their fault I can't be around them and I don't want them to die. Does anyone know someone who absolutely wouldn't kill them and would just like to have their eggs and keep them as pets? They are beautiful ducks and we have a few drakes as well so they are capable of reproducing. (One Khaki female has been trying to set on a nest for the last month and we can't make her stop! We definitely don't need more ducks at this point.)
 
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Everyone in my family is allergic to duck.  I found out when I was 15 and treated to a special duck dinner prepared especially for my birthday in the Poconos.  I was so ill that I had to be rushed to the hospital.  Years later, frying everything in duck fat became a huge fad in the U.S. and  I ran across some duckfat fried potatoes that made me quite ill in a popular food establishment in Washington, D.C.  The restaurant said that they had never heard of the allergy before.  About 20 years later, while living in Oman, I tried a dish at a Chinese restaurant that contained some duck, with even more disastrous results.  Later, in Morocco, some friends took us to their farm and offered us raw milk (I am lactose intolerant) and duck eggs.  No matter how much I tried to politely refuse them, they insisted that I take the milk and eggs home with me for my "health."  I gave them to a neighbor, because I was so afraid, I didn't want to handle the eggs.  Everyone is always surprised when I list duck and rhubarb as my food allergies, but, although they are uncommon, they have proven many times to be true.
 
Deb Stephens
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Tanya Anderson wrote:Everyone in my family is allergic to duck.  I found out when I was 15 and treated to a special duck dinner prepared especially for my birthday in the Poconos.  I was so ill that I had to be rushed to the hospital.  Years later, frying everything in duck fat became a huge fad in the U.S. and  I ran across some duckfat fried potatoes that made me quite ill in a popular food establishment in Washington, D.C.  The restaurant said that they had never heard of the allergy before.  About 20 years later, while living in Oman, I tried a dish at a Chinese restaurant that contained some duck, with even more disastrous results.  Later, in Morocco, some friends took us to their farm and offered us raw milk (I am lactose intolerant) and duck eggs.  No matter how much I tried to politely refuse them, they insisted that I take the milk and eggs home with me for my "health."  I gave them to a neighbor, because I was so afraid, I didn't want to handle the eggs.  Everyone is always surprised when I list duck and rhubarb as my food allergies, but, although they are uncommon, they have proven many times to be true.



I can definitely sympathize! I am extremely allergic to the eggs so I might also be allergic to the duck meat if I ever ate it. (I won't, of course, because I am a vegetarian). We never found anyone to take our ducks so I just avoid getting too close to them--my husband deals with them completely now and I only handle the eggs (we feed them to our dogs) while wearing rubber gloves just to be safe. I'm 63 and never had an allergy before so this really sucks!
 
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