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Name This Tree - Please...

 
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  Huge leaves!
 
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What general area are you in?

Does huge mean 6" or two feet?

Does it have a spicy, somewhat bay-leaf odor when a leaf is bruised?
 
Posts: 106
Location: Central Indiana
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What Terri asked and can you take a picture of the bark too.
 
John Schick
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Terri Pine wrote:What general area are you in?

Does huge mean 6" or two feet?

Does it have a spicy, somewhat bay-leaf odor when a leaf is bruised?



Hi Terri! Leaves are about 12 inches in length. Location is Eastern PA. I'll check out the odor tomorrow. Thanks for your quick reply.

Best, John
 
John Schick
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Jonathan Ward wrote:What Terri asked and can you take a picture of the bark too.



Hi Jonathan! I'll take a picture tomorrow. Thank you for the reply.

Best, John
 
pollinator
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It looks like ash
 
pollinator
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It might be pawpaw.
 
John Schick
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Here's a photo of the bark:
 
Terri Pine
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Looks like pawpaw.  Lucky you.  I was afraid it was some kind of magnolia, but no.
 
Terri Pine
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A torn leaf of pawpaw smells bad, not spicy.  A spicy leaf like that would probably be in the magnolia/laurel family.
 
Dan Allen
pollinator
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Paw Paw's have alternate leaves on the branch, the tree in the picture has compound leaves opposite of each other. I'm quite sure it's a green ash.
 
John Schick
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Thanks everyone! I taped a quarter to a leaf to emphasize the size:  
 
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Location: Eastern PA
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I don't know about the size of the leaves being quite this big, but I would say it looks like a nut bearing tree, maybe a type of walnut or hickory.  I'm also in Eastern, PA.
 
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According to my book that I use for plant identification, there are only three trees with leaves that large.  

This one https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhododendron_maximum has leaves that are 4-12" long.  They are evergreen so I don't feel that is your tree.

The other one https://delawaretrees.com/bigtrees/hardwoods/paw-paw/ has leaves that are 5-10" long.

The third one https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnolia_acuminata has leaves that are 6-10" though the leaves don't look like yours.

I would vote for the pawpaw:



Source
 
pollinator
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I'm going to venture a young bitternut hickory; those shade leaves are really huge!

https://www.forestryimages.org/browse/subthumb.cfm?sub=3260

(Was was pointed out, it isn't a pawpaw - I've got those growing outside my door for comparison.)
 
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I was thinking it reminded me of what we used to call a butternut- then looking at the bark I managed to confuse myself so I'm not sure. You might find this interesting, it particularly describes hybrids and larger leaves. https://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/FNR/FNR-420-W.pdf
 
John Schick
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Thanks guys! I'll check out both links.

Best, John
 
John Schick
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Oh, and Anne's links also!
 
John Schick
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Steve Horst wrote:I don't know about the size of the leaves being quite this big, but I would say it looks like a nut bearing tree, maybe a type of walnut or hickory.  I'm also in Eastern, PA.



Haven't seen any signs of nuts yet Steve.

John
 
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Looks like some type of Hickory or related tree.

The pawpaw is a simple leaf (i.e. one leaf per leaf so to speak) while this looks like a rachis with 5 leaflets.

Are there nut shells on the ground? A good indicator of a nut tree.

Pete
 
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The tree in the picture is pinnately compound, so it's not a Paw Paw.  I agree that it's very likely in the Hickory family

Many of the species in that family are divided by little minute details, like buds.  In your area (western PA), the below are Hickories that are native in your area.  Try googling the botanical name, hitting images, and seeing if any look really close to what you're seeing with that tree:

Bitternut Hickory (Carya cordiformis)
Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata)
Shellbark Hickory (Carya lacinosa)
Mockernut Hickory (Carya tomentosa)
Pignut Hickory (Carya glabra)


Hope this helps!
 
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If it is hickory, crushing a leaf will confirm quickly by smoky smell. And leaf will feel rough and tough.

Paw paw is more of a smooth leaf and feels fragile.
 
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