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Geodesic Dome Insurance

 
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Hey, sorry if this is the wrong topic - couldn't find a proper one.  I'm looking for fellow dome owners (living space) to find out who you use for homeowners insurance.  We live in an American Ingenuity wood frame with concrete panel dome,and our insurance recently dropped us due to "unusual construction" although they've insured us for seven years prior. Seeking out new quotes we're seeing astronomical numbers (in the 3k range) even though we explain to them we've never instigated a claim in the 20 years the dome has been in existence.  We live in Florida and have survived every hurricane, including a large maple tree that landed and only caused minimal damage (fixed by us).

I hope to hear from some other dome owners about how you deal with insurers that don't understand why we're the best investment!!

Thanks-
Jessica and Luke
 
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I don't have personal experience with this myself, but I believe that geodesic dome building companies may be a good place to start asking around for insurance companies.
 
pollinator
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Not to sound like a antagonist, but do you have to have it?

I have a few houses, but because I am a farmer, and two I do not live in, instead of being a cheap $500 a year for homeowners insurance, it would be $1400 a year...for each house. That is $4200 a year just in insurance premiums. So I just do not have insurance, but I own my houses outright, so no insurance required.

In the last ten years alone since I have three houses, I have saved $42,000 dollars. Here we have building companies that have kit houses, and some of their designs are as low as $30,000. So the reality is, I have saved enough money not having insurance to pay for a replacement home myself. I am self-insured in other words.

If you have to have it, my reply is useless, but sometimes people do not think of alternatives. I am super-frugal and think outside the box, so I mention it; for you, and for others where self-insurance might make sense.
 
Jessica Wright
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It's really great to hear this from you Travis, as that'e exactly what we've (somewhat reluctantly) decided to do. We are trained that insurance is a necessary evil, but in truth we are very unlikely to use it. Our only fears are a fire,  or some other unlikely scenario,  such as a small plane crashing down.... But that's how the insurance gets you- feeding on your fears, no matter how unlikely. As it stands,  we are both able bodied and one of us (my better half) built this dome so barring complete devastation we can probably take care of any issues without looking to an insurer. Do you think it's worth the trouble to seek out insurance for fire only, which is the situation that would likely be most devastating and out of our control?
 
Travis Johnson
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Jessica Wright wrote:It's really great to hear this from you Travis, as that'e exactly what we've (somewhat reluctantly) decided to do. We are trained that insurance is a necessary evil, but in truth we are very unlikely to use it. Our only fears are a fire,  or some other unlikely scenario,  such as a small plane crashing down.... But that's how the insurance gets you- feeding on your fears, no matter how unlikely. As it stands,  we are both able bodied and one of us (my better half) built this dome so barring complete devastation we can probably take care of any issues without looking to an insurer. Do you think it's worth the trouble to seek out insurance for fire only, which is the situation that would likely be most devastating and out of our control?



Jessica, I am not really the person to ask. I really HATE insurance, BUT I also am okay with taking risks...risks others would not really take.

It is easy to look back on 10 years of no problems and state that I did well because of it. I have, but had my home burned in the second year, it would have been a losing proposition.

For you, I might really research how fires start in Florida and then invest in your home to prevent them. For instance, I would think electrical fires would be a big contributor to fires, so what if you invested in arc fault protection in your load box. Or what if you installed GFCI's as the first outlet in your circuits? They would greatly reduce your chance of fire, and would cost less than one month of expensive home owners insurance.

Again, I do not know your circumstance, but being without insurance does not mean risky business. Figure out wat your greatest loss potential is (and it seems as if it is fire) and thus invest yourself in ways to minimize that risk.

Note: I say "in Florida" because in Maine, woodstoves cause the most fires. I do have a woodstove, but use it infrequently, and am really careful with it. But also keep in mind, I have (3) houses, so if one burns, I can go to another. Two are currently up for sale, so if they do sell, well I will really have to be cautious.
 
Travis Johnson
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One way I am really careful against fire, is having a Green Switch. It is hard to retrofit on an existing house, but if installed, it allows me to kill 90% of the electricity in my home when I am not there. This is huge because with that switch off, 90% of electrical fires cannot happen in my house. The well pump cannot come on either and flood my house from a busted washing machine hose. A lot of risks are eliminated with that one switch.

It does not mean those things will not happen, but when I am home, I can smell smoke better, or see flooding, etc. Again, I cannot eliminate all risk of loss, but I can eliminate some of it. My Green Switch really helps with that, and gives me peace of mind when I am not home.

For instance, "Did I leave the oven on before we left for that out of state trip?" Nope, the green switch was off. I can even have the wife take a picture of the green switch off with her phone, so she need not worry. She just looks at her phone, sees the switch was thrown, and there is little to worry about while we are gone.
 
Don't listen to Steve. Just read this tiny ad:
3 Plant Types You Need to Know: Perennial, Biennial, and Annual
https://permies.com/t/96847/Pros-cons-perennial-biennial-annual
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