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Gay, the old frontier. We never left the country

 
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Dale Hodgins wrote:Hi there. I'm batting for the other team but thought you guys and girls might get a chuckle out of this.    

 



Funny!
 
John Kompa
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Hey all!  What's new in your worlds?  What are you doing right now?
 
steward
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I joined the Permaculture Bootcamp, and I am having a great time! I'm enjoying trying to cook for many people and making fermented foods!
 
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I've been doing a lot of volunteer activism. I'm setting up a food forest at a Methodist Church on Sunday, and I'm moving towards doing a large interfaith project down in Portland with my bee club next year. Fingers crossed. Other than that, looking forward to fall and winter.
 
pollinator
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We've been facing existential questions to answer. Permaculture isn't really a thing here in Colombia, so that's not a good selling point yet. Funny enough focussing on a gay public did get us attention. For that we started a parallel website on www.ecogay.org

We'd hoped that some people would have joined us one way or the other, which also didn't happen yet. Our farm, when working it in the "permaculture" way, is too big for just the both of us.

So we've set out 4 different paths and we hope to figure out which one will work.
1. See if someone (or several people) wants to join us in a community kind of way, but with a bit of cash to invest
2. See if we can find an investor to help build out tourism options (building cabins etc)
3. Colombians may not be into permaculture at this time, but they love to spend weekends out of the city... We're about to start selling pieces of land to start a small gay condominium... Maybe that will work out. We can create a job as caretaker for ourselves like that as well. And tourism can still be added, our place is great for that.
4. If all of the above don't get any traction the remaining months of this year, we'll sell, buy something smaller and start again. That would be a shame, but we think we've reached the end of what we can do being just two guys on a huge mountain.

More on www.EcoGay.org
 
John Kompa
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Dave Burton wrote:I joined the Permaculture Bootcamp, and I am having a great time! I'm enjoying trying to cook for many people and making fermented foods!



How's the bootcamp coming along?  What kind of fermented foods are you growing?
 
John Kompa
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James Landreth wrote:I've been doing a lot of volunteer activism. I'm setting up a food forest at a Methodist Church on Sunday, and I'm moving towards doing a large interfaith project down in Portland with my bee club next year. Fingers crossed. Other than that, looking forward to fall and winter.



That's a lot on your plate, James!  How's that working out so far?  Yeah, it sounds like you'll need that time to wind down and explore some other avenues of interests too until Spring.
 
John Kompa
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Rene Nijstad wrote:We've been facing existential questions to answer. Permaculture isn't really a thing here in Colombia, so that's not a good selling point yet. Funny enough focussing on a gay public did get us attention. For that we started a parallel website on www.ecogay.org

We'd hoped that some people would have joined us one way or the other, which also didn't happen yet. Our farm, when working it in the "permaculture" way, is too big for just the both of us.

So we've set out 4 different paths and we hope to figure out which one will work.
1. See if someone (or several people) wants to join us in a community kind of way, but with a bit of cash to invest
2. See if we can find an investor to help build out tourism options (building cabins etc)
3. Colombians may not be into permaculture at this time, but they love to spend weekends out of the city... We're about to start selling pieces of land to start a small gay condominium... Maybe that will work out. We can create a job as caretaker for ourselves like that as well. And tourism can still be added, our place is great for that.
4. If all of the above don't get any traction the remaining months of this year, we'll sell, buy something smaller and start again. That would be a shame, but we think we've reached the end of what we can do being just two guys on a huge mountain.

More on www.EcoGay.org



Hi Rene,

I took a look at your website.  You've set yourself up for a great big adventure for just the two of you with some strong goals.  I have a background in English/Education and Business/Human Resources.  I have got a few ideas for you that I think can help.  Maybe we can talk?  Shoot me a 'purple mooseage' when you see this post!

-John
 
Dave Burton
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I’m enjoying the Bootcamp; I think that we’re doing good work. In my opinion, creation can be a slow and repetitive process, but, I think it is worth it in the end when we can look at something and say we did it! For example, I kinda became the designated whitewasher, because I had the patience and gentleness to make the limewash really express its beauty and character! I applied many layers of limewash inside Allerton Abbey slowly and methodically, and now, that room is a gorgeous pretty white!

At the moment, I have peaso, cortido, sweet potato pickles, carrot kimchi, bean paste, mint chutney, and peach chutney going. Many of these are extended ferment duplicates of ferments I’ve tasted and tried at earlier times. I’m letting some of the duplicates go 1 month and some go 3 months or more.
 
John Kompa
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Dave Burton wrote:I’m enjoying the Bootcamp; I think that we’re doing good work. In my opinion, creation can be a slow and repetitive process, but, I think it is worth it in the end when we can look at something and say we did it! For example, I kinda became the designated whitewasher, because I had the patience and gentleness to make the limewash really express its beauty and character! I applied many layers of limewash inside Allerton Abbey slowly and methodically, and now, that room is a gorgeous pretty white!

At the moment, I have peaso, cortido, sweet potato pickles, carrot kimchi, bean paste, mint chutney, and peach chutney going. Many of these are extended ferment duplicates of ferments I’ve tasted and tried at earlier times. I’m letting some of the duplicates go 1 month and some go 3 months or more.



Wow!  I'm happy to hear you're enjoying yourself and learning new skills.  It's funny how we kinda just figure things out like we were meant to know what to do.

Now I'm wondering what sweet potato pickles taste like.  The mint chutney I wish I could try.  I don't have any experience with fermenting, but I'm assuming there is a huge difference between letting something ferment 1 month vs 3+ months?  Do certain foods require shorter/longer fermenting times?
 
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Location: SW Michigan
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Hi Folks of all kinds.

First of all. I have let a lot of things go. This thread was one of them. I apologise. I got stuck back in the city again. No regrets, but time to back to my farm house.

I am selling one property to buy a different one. Lots of finagling to be sure. I found out a farmer has been bleeding into some of my field. He knows it but is acting he does not know,...whatever.

A new survey as soon as I can afford it. Then we re-fence. Popa knows how to put in a straight fence.

So, I got my canning in. We smoked a few hams and yes, it was sad to butcher them. But, as my parents always said to us in the fall. "They had the best lives a pig can expect." Same with all the other livestock. Usually my dad would look at one of us kids and say, "he looks ready for the hook," or something like that. Lol, thus teasing who would be dinner. Lol, mom and dad always put a bit of the spin on it all. A good life, a quick and swift kill, not the torture the industrial farms do. Cutting them before they are dead. Cows scream as they are cut up are not dead.

Usually a moment of silence after we killed them. Let the spirit leave. Be thankful and lest we be wasteful. Then the hoisting and cutting begin. Thank God for this fine animal to be our food.

In an indigenous tribe in Africa, they kill the beast with a poison arrow. As it is dying, the hunter apologises to the animal. Thanking it as it dies. Lets it die as best can be done.

So kids, whats new in your worlds. I am tickled pink the thread is still here. I am single men. Lol, planning to stay that way I think. Dogs are old now, almost 14. Life is good. Crops did okish. Lets see how my flax does nest year. Locally we have Equine Encephalitis. They want to spray this week the region. I am against it. Just kills the planet more.

Tell us how are things for you folks.





 
Dave Burton
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I think there is a difference in the flavor profile of ferments depending on the time spent fermenting them. I find that I prefer ferments on the slightly longer scale, because I enjoy a stronger fermented taste to my ferments. The younger ferments are nice, too. I am an amateur at fermenting, and I prefer to do experiments, which is why I made some ferments in duplicate and triplicate. That way I can taste one jar at a week old, another jar at 1 month, and another jar at 3 months or longer.

In general, I find that I prefer the fruity ferments younger, because then, I get a nice sweet and sour profile. Whereas, if I let them go longer, I tend to get more sourness (which is enjoyable, too!). I prefer my vegetable, grains, and beans ferments to go longer, mostly because I like that a stronger fermented flavor in these. Also, I would prefer for the bacteria and fungi to more fully digest these food groups for me, so that I have an easier time digesting them. This is just kinda my preferences. I am reluctant to say or agree with others that any amount of time is "required." I find that some of this also varies with the temperature inside the room where the ferments are being stored, too.
 
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Posted 7 years ago-----are you still looking?  I am interested (heart)
 
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Gay and single.

35 and starting to think I'll be single forever.

Just kidding. Grumpy cat is my spirit animal. grumpy I have always been. even as a child my uncles would get mad at me for having a "smart mouth". It took me years to figure out I'm not a bad kid. It's just my nature. As such you learn to live alone. Which is odd since I like having a friend around all the time. just not a lot of people. especially not a lot of annoying people. I'm convinced I'll meet my beloved partner for the first time at the grocery store at 5 am. I'm early to bed early to bed early to rise, really early. people are the silliest in the evening. Also waking up at 4 am gives me a few hours of blessed silence and isolation I can't get during a busy day.

I'm two years away from buying a permie farm in nw Arizona. I figure I'll create a shade forest with wild forage and live simple life. Grow enough food to send to my family harvest by mail.
 
John Kompa
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Hi Dakota,

It’s good to meet another high desert Gardner.  How are you? I’m in NV near Reno.  

How many acres are you looking for in NW Arizona?

John

Dakota Miller wrote:Gay and single.

35 and starting to think I'll be single forever.

Just kidding. Grumpy cat is my spirit animal. grumpy I have always been. even as a child my uncles would get mad at me for having a "smart mouth". It took me years to figure out I'm not a bad kid. It's just my nature. As such you learn to live alone. Which is odd since I like having a friend around all the time. just not a lot of people. especially not a lot of annoying people. I'm convinced I'll meet my beloved partner for the first time at the grocery store at 5 am. I'm early to bed early to bed early to rise, really early. people are the silliest in the evening. Also waking up at 4 am gives me a few hours of blessed silence and isolation I can't get during a busy day.

I'm two years away from buying a permie farm in nw Arizona. I figure I'll create a shade forest with wild forage and live simple life. Grow enough food to send to my family harvest by mail.

 
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Grew up on a small farm 48 years old out of long term relartionship been a yr and 6/7 mths anyway anyone looking for a good old boy that needs out of this state and far far far away from his ex a narcissists who will not leave me alone? Lol SERIOUSLY? Of course after we get to know each other I'm not that easy but if so I'm willing and able to work hard on a farm. Well here goes I dont even know how I found this page but here's to us all. Have a great weekend!!
 
Daniel Morse
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Happy Solstice,

Good day friends. Been a while. I myself had to come back to the city for reasons. How are you all doing? My garden has dipped inot warp drive.

SO people of the lands how are YOU? Tell us your story and titillate Paul and the rest us plotters.
 
gardener
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I'm happy to see this thread in the "Recent" list, and enjoyed reading through everyone's posts.

34-M here who is perpetually single (and loving it) from a small town in central Texas.


 
John Kompa
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Hey all! Hoping to drum up some activity on this thread.  Anyone in Northern Nevada, particularly around Reno?  Would love to meet other gay/lesbian permaculture folk.  I recently purchased just over two acres and learning to develop the soil here.  Waaay too hard, sandy, and rocky!!

This is me now with a new look



Always,


John
 
Daniel Morse
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Good Morning.

A lot has happened in the world since my last post. Today it is 9/11/2021.

I was in NYC that week after the attacks. I can talk about it, but I will not. Why? Everyone else is. Or they should be.

It was there at Ground Zero. I began to think a little harder about my farm and agriculture roots as I stood there.  Mom and Dad were my age then. They are still farming. I considered it...... Still, young I was working and traveling. Chasing the brass ring, so to say. Lol, it was soon after this work took me to the desert of California. There I had bought some land. I bought and converted a school bus and moved all the stuff, the partner and the dogs across country.

Now its a thing to do. I did it 20ish years ago. Like you, I was ahead of my time.

Now, the Plandemic has fleshed out millions out of cities to more rural and away from the crumbling cities. We were right to come out long ago. Congrats to all of you. YOU are ahead of the curve. Sadly they exodus of these nice city people have brought many real problems to our peaceful and backwards lifestyle. I say this because I was verbally attacked by some well meaning city guys about "us" rural gays and how we are traitors to our own ranks.

Of course they thought the guy in the overalls was hot and offers of sorts of relationships were made when others were not looking.

I do not have time for soft handed men who act like boys. Never did, never will. Sorry, go play and gbye.

I want to refresh this threat. All of you have dirt under your nails. Weather you live rural or urban. Where I sit this morning, I am on a visit to Detroit, MI. I know of many urban gardens and such. Also, at my farmette and other lands across the state, many are digging in also. There are a lot pf good stuff going on. Many of you are healing. I have been very, very ill. I was not sure if I would make it this far, Like you, we are survivors. Congrats. You made it.

Now, the serious stuff.

Gay in the frontier. No matter where you are, I need you to post. Lets chat. I still do not have internet at the farm but will try to keep going. We have a lot to share. We have a lot to talk about. We need each other. I do not like what I am seeing. I feel all of us, gay, straight, or whatever you call your self (just not late for dinner.gasp!) we need to kick into survival mode. No panic, just lets talk, help each other and rejoice.

We are still free.

Now a true story.

A few years ago I was in the Mideast. I will not say where. In a deep structure that was older than the time of the current age. I was witness to a group of other gay men and women. Very, very secret. This group told me of how they fear for their lives every day. A woman held my hand and cried. Here she could meet her partner and others and be free. The men told me stories of beatings, brutality I will not talk about. You imagination can fill in the gaps.

They all told me their stories of hell. For being how the intergalactic god or gods or earth god or goddess made them. I listened. I prayed with them. I gave them hope. I told them of my life. in contrast it just sounded hollow and pithy. My problems were nothing. NOTHING.

I can still see them in my minds eye.

Rejoice kids. We made it this far. We will go further. Remember this. What we do on the land. How we conduct our lives. Treat each other. How we love this world. Created a beacon of hope for not just us. A light of hope for all man-woman-human-animal and earthly kind. The enemies and evil is legion.

We are stronger.

Well. on a lighter note. MY new egg incubator is working. We were charged an extra 50 dollars at the mill for it. I heard the guys talking about it out back. They laughed a lot. I did not tell my partner as it would have upset him. I blend in well like that. I hear a lot of stuff from the guys. The partner not as much. I think we will have about 30 chicks in our first batch.

Of course two hens go broody a week after I fill the incubator. At least we had no broken eggs.

Life goes on. Grateful to be an American on the land.

Daniel Morse  9/11/2021
 
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Hey yall.

A lot of good things have come my way since the 3 years ago I posted here. I've been blessed really. After 4 years of saving money, living rent free with my dad, I bought 1.7 acres of land 50 minutes outside of Atlanta, Georgia. I tell ya, making big decisions is scary - I can't help but question if this is the path I should be going down. Just as I've been making good friends in the gay community in the city, I set my roots down away from them. But with the increase in crime and restrictions that never seem to end in the city, I'm happy with my choice.

I'd describe the land as a "hollow" - it's a small valley off of a ridge, that is mostly flat and fertile. The previous owners had about 500 sq/ft of raised beds and cold frames that are east and south facing. I back into the 70 acres of woods, with a lot of deer to hunt. And I just adore my neighbors. Both couples are in retirement and so helpful, friendly and excited about my plans.

Next week I'm getting a gravel driveway put in and laying out 500 feet of waterline and conduit. I bought a 13x16' canvas tent and am building a deck with front porch with it. Gonna be living in it for the time being until I build a small cabin.

I'm still single, and though I'm happy, I'm ready for a relationship.
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Hey all, good to see community!

I'm still in the (small) city doing the apartment thing while we save and search, but we are actively looking for land to put down some rural roots. We sold our last place a few years back, but it was more of an urban homestead set-up on the edge of town. I do miss the ducks and the root cellar, though!

It's a challenge. What with rising costs and low availability, and I'll be honest,  some safety concerns. We're two women with a teenage son, so can probably fly under the radar when need be in some of the less forgiving areas of the state. I'm a country gal originally, but the wife was always a city mouse until she met me 17 years ago. Years of living with me and I guess she is ready to go full country, so our search keeps getting further and further from civilization ;)

On the urban front, we've had a good year. Lots of peppers, tomatoes, and herbs from our balcony garden. We've foraged and gleaned a lot of fresh fruit -- I've put up plum preserves, blackberries in various forms, dehydrated apples for later use in pies and apple butters, stocked the herbal medicine cabinet with wild plants, put up a lot of nettle pesto and nettle powder for soups, and become an active participant in a community sharing economy scheme. In a few days we'll be going out for more apples and pears at a remnant orchard we stumbled upon, nicely tucked away on public lands where foraging isn't frowned upon.
 
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For anyone on this group who is homeschooling their kids, here is something you might be interested in! I noticed there is a huge gap in the market for homestead themed school books, so I’ve started working on some, and hope to have lots more available soon. They are all inclusive and non gender specific. I really hope you guys find these helpful, and that your kids enjoy them!

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X41F69R?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B09X6SBC39?ref_=pe_3052080_397514860
 
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