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Gay, the old frontier. We never left the country

 
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Dale Hodgins wrote:Hi there. I'm batting for the other team but thought you guys and girls might get a chuckle out of this.    

 



Funny!
 
John Kompa
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Hey all!  What's new in your worlds?  What are you doing right now?
 
steward
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2096
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I joined the Permaculture Bootcamp, and I am having a great time! I'm enjoying trying to cook for many people and making fermented foods!
 
gardener
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Location: Western Washington
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I've been doing a lot of volunteer activism. I'm setting up a food forest at a Methodist Church on Sunday, and I'm moving towards doing a large interfaith project down in Portland with my bee club next year. Fingers crossed. Other than that, looking forward to fall and winter.
 
pollinator
Posts: 292
Location: La Mesa, Cundinamarca, Colombia
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We've been facing existential questions to answer. Permaculture isn't really a thing here in Colombia, so that's not a good selling point yet. Funny enough focussing on a gay public did get us attention. For that we started a parallel website on www.ecogay.org

We'd hoped that some people would have joined us one way or the other, which also didn't happen yet. Our farm, when working it in the "permaculture" way, is too big for just the both of us.

So we've set out 4 different paths and we hope to figure out which one will work.
1. See if someone (or several people) wants to join us in a community kind of way, but with a bit of cash to invest
2. See if we can find an investor to help build out tourism options (building cabins etc)
3. Colombians may not be into permaculture at this time, but they love to spend weekends out of the city... We're about to start selling pieces of land to start a small gay condominium... Maybe that will work out. We can create a job as caretaker for ourselves like that as well. And tourism can still be added, our place is great for that.
4. If all of the above don't get any traction the remaining months of this year, we'll sell, buy something smaller and start again. That would be a shame, but we think we've reached the end of what we can do being just two guys on a huge mountain.

More on www.EcoGay.org
 
John Kompa
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Dave Burton wrote:I joined the Permaculture Bootcamp, and I am having a great time! I'm enjoying trying to cook for many people and making fermented foods!



How's the bootcamp coming along?  What kind of fermented foods are you growing?
 
John Kompa
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James Landreth wrote:I've been doing a lot of volunteer activism. I'm setting up a food forest at a Methodist Church on Sunday, and I'm moving towards doing a large interfaith project down in Portland with my bee club next year. Fingers crossed. Other than that, looking forward to fall and winter.



That's a lot on your plate, James!  How's that working out so far?  Yeah, it sounds like you'll need that time to wind down and explore some other avenues of interests too until Spring.
 
John Kompa
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Rene Nijstad wrote:We've been facing existential questions to answer. Permaculture isn't really a thing here in Colombia, so that's not a good selling point yet. Funny enough focussing on a gay public did get us attention. For that we started a parallel website on www.ecogay.org

We'd hoped that some people would have joined us one way or the other, which also didn't happen yet. Our farm, when working it in the "permaculture" way, is too big for just the both of us.

So we've set out 4 different paths and we hope to figure out which one will work.
1. See if someone (or several people) wants to join us in a community kind of way, but with a bit of cash to invest
2. See if we can find an investor to help build out tourism options (building cabins etc)
3. Colombians may not be into permaculture at this time, but they love to spend weekends out of the city... We're about to start selling pieces of land to start a small gay condominium... Maybe that will work out. We can create a job as caretaker for ourselves like that as well. And tourism can still be added, our place is great for that.
4. If all of the above don't get any traction the remaining months of this year, we'll sell, buy something smaller and start again. That would be a shame, but we think we've reached the end of what we can do being just two guys on a huge mountain.

More on www.EcoGay.org



Hi Rene,

I took a look at your website.  You've set yourself up for a great big adventure for just the two of you with some strong goals.  I have a background in English/Education and Business/Human Resources.  I have got a few ideas for you that I think can help.  Maybe we can talk?  Shoot me a 'purple mooseage' when you see this post!

-John
 
Dave Burton
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Location: United States
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I’m enjoying the Bootcamp; I think that we’re doing good work. In my opinion, creation can be a slow and repetitive process, but, I think it is worth it in the end when we can look at something and say we did it! For example, I kinda became the designated whitewasher, because I had the patience and gentleness to make the limewash really express its beauty and character! I applied many layers of limewash inside Allerton Abbey slowly and methodically, and now, that room is a gorgeous pretty white!

At the moment, I have peaso, cortido, sweet potato pickles, carrot kimchi, bean paste, mint chutney, and peach chutney going. Many of these are extended ferment duplicates of ferments I’ve tasted and tried at earlier times. I’m letting some of the duplicates go 1 month and some go 3 months or more.
 
John Kompa
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Dave Burton wrote:I’m enjoying the Bootcamp; I think that we’re doing good work. In my opinion, creation can be a slow and repetitive process, but, I think it is worth it in the end when we can look at something and say we did it! For example, I kinda became the designated whitewasher, because I had the patience and gentleness to make the limewash really express its beauty and character! I applied many layers of limewash inside Allerton Abbey slowly and methodically, and now, that room is a gorgeous pretty white!

At the moment, I have peaso, cortido, sweet potato pickles, carrot kimchi, bean paste, mint chutney, and peach chutney going. Many of these are extended ferment duplicates of ferments I’ve tasted and tried at earlier times. I’m letting some of the duplicates go 1 month and some go 3 months or more.



Wow!  I'm happy to hear you're enjoying yourself and learning new skills.  It's funny how we kinda just figure things out like we were meant to know what to do.

Now I'm wondering what sweet potato pickles taste like.  The mint chutney I wish I could try.  I don't have any experience with fermenting, but I'm assuming there is a huge difference between letting something ferment 1 month vs 3+ months?  Do certain foods require shorter/longer fermenting times?
 
Posts: 287
Location: SW Michigan
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Hi Folks of all kinds.

First of all. I have let a lot of things go. This thread was one of them. I apologise. I got stuck back in the city again. No regrets, but time to back to my farm house.

I am selling one property to buy a different one. Lots of finagling to be sure. I found out a farmer has been bleeding into some of my field. He knows it but is acting he does not know,...whatever.

A new survey as soon as I can afford it. Then we re-fence. Popa knows how to put in a straight fence.

So, I got my canning in. We smoked a few hams and yes, it was sad to butcher them. But, as my parents always said to us in the fall. "They had the best lives a pig can expect." Same with all the other livestock. Usually my dad would look at one of us kids and say, "he looks ready for the hook," or something like that. Lol, thus teasing who would be dinner. Lol, mom and dad always put a bit of the spin on it all. A good life, a quick and swift kill, not the torture the industrial farms do. Cutting them before they are dead. Cows scream as they are cut up are not dead.

Usually a moment of silence after we killed them. Let the spirit leave. Be thankful and lest we be wasteful. Then the hoisting and cutting begin. Thank God for this fine animal to be our food.

In an indigenous tribe in Africa, they kill the beast with a poison arrow. As it is dying, the hunter apologises to the animal. Thanking it as it dies. Lets it die as best can be done.

So kids, whats new in your worlds. I am tickled pink the thread is still here. I am single men. Lol, planning to stay that way I think. Dogs are old now, almost 14. Life is good. Crops did okish. Lets see how my flax does nest year. Locally we have Equine Encephalitis. They want to spray this week the region. I am against it. Just kills the planet more.

Tell us how are things for you folks.





 
Dave Burton
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I think there is a difference in the flavor profile of ferments depending on the time spent fermenting them. I find that I prefer ferments on the slightly longer scale, because I enjoy a stronger fermented taste to my ferments. The younger ferments are nice, too. I am an amateur at fermenting, and I prefer to do experiments, which is why I made some ferments in duplicate and triplicate. That way I can taste one jar at a week old, another jar at 1 month, and another jar at 3 months or longer.

In general, I find that I prefer the fruity ferments younger, because then, I get a nice sweet and sour profile. Whereas, if I let them go longer, I tend to get more sourness (which is enjoyable, too!). I prefer my vegetable, grains, and beans ferments to go longer, mostly because I like that a stronger fermented flavor in these. Also, I would prefer for the bacteria and fungi to more fully digest these food groups for me, so that I have an easier time digesting them. This is just kinda my preferences. I am reluctant to say or agree with others that any amount of time is "required." I find that some of this also varies with the temperature inside the room where the ferments are being stored, too.
 
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Posted 7 years ago-----are you still looking?  I am interested (heart)
 
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Gay and single.

35 and starting to think I'll be single forever.

Just kidding. Grumpy cat is my spirit animal. grumpy I have always been. even as a child my uncles would get mad at me for having a "smart mouth". It took me years to figure out I'm not a bad kid. It's just my nature. As such you learn to live alone. Which is odd since I like having a friend around all the time. just not a lot of people. especially not a lot of annoying people. I'm convinced I'll meet my beloved partner for the first time at the grocery store at 5 am. I'm early to bed early to bed early to rise, really early. people are the silliest in the evening. Also waking up at 4 am gives me a few hours of blessed silence and isolation I can't get during a busy day.

I'm two years away from buying a permie farm in nw Arizona. I figure I'll create a shade forest with wild forage and live simple life. Grow enough food to send to my family harvest by mail.
 
John Kompa
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Hi Dakota,

It’s good to meet another high desert Gardner.  How are you? I’m in NV near Reno.  

How many acres are you looking for in NW Arizona?

John

Dakota Miller wrote:Gay and single.

35 and starting to think I'll be single forever.

Just kidding. Grumpy cat is my spirit animal. grumpy I have always been. even as a child my uncles would get mad at me for having a "smart mouth". It took me years to figure out I'm not a bad kid. It's just my nature. As such you learn to live alone. Which is odd since I like having a friend around all the time. just not a lot of people. especially not a lot of annoying people. I'm convinced I'll meet my beloved partner for the first time at the grocery store at 5 am. I'm early to bed early to bed early to rise, really early. people are the silliest in the evening. Also waking up at 4 am gives me a few hours of blessed silence and isolation I can't get during a busy day.

I'm two years away from buying a permie farm in nw Arizona. I figure I'll create a shade forest with wild forage and live simple life. Grow enough food to send to my family harvest by mail.

 
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Grew up on a small farm 48 years old out of long term relartionship been a yr and 6/7 mths anyway anyone looking for a good old boy that needs out of this state and far far far away from his ex a narcissists who will not leave me alone? Lol SERIOUSLY? Of course after we get to know each other I'm not that easy but if so I'm willing and able to work hard on a farm. Well here goes I dont even know how I found this page but here's to us all. Have a great weekend!!
 
Daniel Morse
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Happy Solstice,

Good day friends. Been a while. I myself had to come back to the city for reasons. How are you all doing? My garden has dipped inot warp drive.

SO people of the lands how are YOU? Tell us your story and titillate Paul and the rest us plotters.
 
pollinator
Posts: 475
Location: Central Texas
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I'm happy to see this thread in the "Recent" list, and enjoyed reading through everyone's posts.

34-M here who is perpetually single (and loving it) from a small town in central Texas.


 
Yeah. What he said. Totally. Wait. What? Sorry, I was looking at this tiny ad:
Native Bee Guide by Crown Bees
https://permies.com/wiki/105944/Native-Bee-Guide-Crown-Bees
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