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composting wood chips with chicken litter and fungi

 
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3/11/2020 Update

So I decided today I would start to put the chips to good use.  Initially I had thought about letting them sit and rot on their own just a bit, but the weather was nice so I decided to strike while the iron was hot.  I finally got around to building frames to Bed #3 which already had some nicely inoculated woodchips just sitting there.  I went ahead and loaded 7-8 bucket scoops of chips to fill up the bed.  I was a little surprised by how manywoodchips were needed to fill a bed that was already partially full.  I included a picture of my woodchip pile with several bites taken out.  Bed #3 is slightly mounded at the center.  I tried to spread the chips as evenly as possible, but I may need another load of chips to fill in along the edge.

My plans for bed #3 is to plant both summer and winter squash.  I am thinking I will give preference to the winter squash as I have never grown it before.  I bet that a mere 4 plants of summer squash will be plenty.  Given the volume of fresh chips, I might have to resort to using fertile holes.  Preferably I would do this without any more outside inputs, and I do have one of these tools at my disposal--rabbit.  I might have enough of the bunny-poo to make enough fertile holes to get maybe a dozen or so holes for the squash.  

I don't expect any wine caps from bed#3 this year as it presently has a fairly thick layer of chips on top of the old inoculated ones.  Maybe I will get surprised and one or two will pop out, but I am not really expecting any from this bed.  I am expecting wine caps from bed #2 and maybe bed#1, though bed #1 has been thoroughly decayed by this time.  We will see what happens.  After the expected wine cap flushes, I will go ahead and top off beds 1 & 2.

Here are some pictures:

IMG_5961.JPG
Wood chip pile missing several loads
Wood chip pile missing several loads
IMG_5962.JPG
Bed #3 in the foreground, Bed #2 in the background, wood chip pile in the background and an old trailer in the middle
Bed #3 in the foreground, Bed #2 in the background, wood chip pile in the background and an old trailer in the middle
IMG_5964.JPG
Bed #3 in the foreground, chip pile in the background and Bed#1 in the background to the left
Bed #3 in the foreground, chip pile in the background and Bed#1 in the background to the right
IMG_5967.JPG
A log edge in bed #1 completely rotted away, partially by wine caps--last spring this still looked like a log, that's what wine caps can do
A log edge in bed #1 completely rotted away, partially by wine caps--last spring this still looked like a log, that
 
Eric Hanson
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Jay,

Actually I like those Wallenstien chippers and I really do understand the clean-as-you-go ethic.  Wildfires are pretty rare by me as we are generally wet and humid enough that fires don’t generally spread.  But if I lived in fire country I think I would find a way to afford a decent chipper.  I think a chipper would be a whole lot cheaper than a fire.

Eric
 
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Eric Hanson wrote:

I think a chipper would be a whole lot cheaper than a fire.

Are you competing for the "understatement of the year award?" After what happened recently in Australia, and what has happened not many years ago in the interior of BC, I'm looking for easy ways to hold water in the soil, and keep the "small branches" under control as they feed the start of a fire much more than a large log on the ground does.

Eric Hanson also wrote:

I bet that a mere 4 plants of summer squash will be plenty.

Yes, likely. That said it does depend on varieties - some "Delicatas" seem to be usable as a "summer squash" when young, but if allowed to mature, have a fairly tough shell that helps them keep much longer than some squash. Unfortunately squash is a hard sell at this house with the exception of pumpkin - in pie form! Luckily I have a fairly healthy recipe I can use for pumpkin pie.
I have also grated and then dried summer squash - then I crush it to thicken things like spaghetti sauce or some soups. With our humid summers, I have to rely on an electric food dryer, but life is all about compromises.
I have also made zucchini pickles with onion slices - I like them!
If worse comes to worse and you have too many summer squash, you have my permission to gift them to the compost gods.  ;-)  
 
Eric Hanson
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Jay,

Not really *trying* to understate, but just trying to state the obvious.  In my area a wood-chipper is a luxury whereas by you it is more a necessity.  And yes, what happened in Australia is terrifying and heartbreaking at the same time.  

But good that you trim right into a container to make the chipping that much easier.

Regarding the summer squash, I will probably plant some zucchini and some yellow squash.  For winter squash I would like to plant some acorn squash and some blue Hubbard squash.  I would plant pumpkin were it not for two major factors.

1). I am the only person in my family that likes pumpkin pie!

2). I have tried to grow pumpkins before but bugs and powdery mildew (I think) has always killed off the pumpkins while still small.

Any suggestions on how to get the winter squash to grow healthy?  I am hoping that having healthy bedding will make for healthy plants.  I have a neighbor who sells pumpkins and I asked how he got his plants to survive.  He told me that he buys “special” seeds that are treated with a variety of toxic Gick and that he will only handle the seeds while wearing rubber gloves!  Yuck!  No way am I going to do that!  I would rather lose my crops than poisoning my soil.

Thanks in advance,

Eric
 
Jay Angler
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Because I'm starting a limited quantity, I start mine in homemade biodegradable pots - currently re-using organic coffee sacks, but if you don't mind feeding the international monster, 4" coir pots would do the job. This way I can get them started and large enough to help them out-grow the slugs. I've never had an issue with squash vine borers and I think having healthy soil, using nothing to kill off the predator bugs, and actually planting things that will feed and shelter the predators is the best you can do. When mildew has struck early and I remember, spraying with milk seems to do the trick - I've read this in a number of places, but it's been years since I've needed to. I think moving the plants around each year and making sure there's good air flow (so don't plant too many in too small an area and make sure they've got places to run or climb to keep them out of your way) will help. My "Carrots Love Tomatoes" book claims, "Icicle radishes planted in the same hill help and planting earlier or later than usual." Last year I tried a "3 sisters" bed with corn, beans and squash, but I got the squash started too late and it was out-competed for sun which is always my limiting factor. I plan to try again! The Scarlet Runner beans did great. I am definitely trying much more to plant polycultures even if they're all annuals.
 
Eric Hanson
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Jay,

Actually I never had s problem getting pumpkins to start—I don’t have the slug pressure that you have—my baby pumpkin plants practically leap out of the ground.  My problem always came when I had several fruits on a vine and they got to about the size of a  grapefruit.  At that point the leaves would start to turn yellow and within about two weeks Squash bugs arrived in droves and the dark, green leaves got a whitish something growing on them (I assume that was powdery mildew).  About 1-2 weeks later the whole plant, vines, fruit and all turned yellow, shriveled up and died.

I never ever used any toxic Gick (even in my pre-Permies days toxic Gick made me nervous), but I did try some OMRI approved products, notably Neem and insecticidal soap.  At best these delayed the inevitable death of the vine.

I did some research and my findings were that for reasons I don’t understand, pumpkins are especially vulnerable to these pest and disease vectors.  Further, most non-pumpkin squash appeared resistant to these little critters.  My summer squash never suffered from anything despite seeing one or two squash bugs.  So with a little optimism and fingers crossed I am going to give winter squash a try again and hope that my wonderful garden bedding full of life makes a difference.

Eric
 
Jay Angler
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Eric Hanson wrote:

At that point the leaves would start to turn yellow and within about two weeks Squash bugs arrived in droves and the dark, green leaves got a whitish something growing on them

I'm suspicious that the "going yellow" part may have actually attracted the squash bugs - just like wolves looking for the sick or weak prey. I think you should put a post in the growies area describing the problem and how you've improved your soil. Something as simple as compost tea just before the risk period might be all you require to fix things, but you need people who would know your ecosystem/weather patterns etc. The yellow leaves make me think low nitrogen, but I may just think that because winter squash are heavy feeders, which is why the natives grew it with beans (although they were to help the corn also!)
 
Eric Hanson
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Jay,

You have several excellent points.  First though, I doubt it was nitrogen deficiency as I always planted the pumpkins in manure juiced up with blood and bone meal.  Also, this was only ever with pumpkins, and for reasons I don’t know/understand, many others in the area have similar issues.  Lastly, I have heard that this is specific to pumpkins and not other winter squash.

But you are right, I should/will head over to growies and post the question there.

Thanks Jay!

Eric
 
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Changing the subject back to woodchips, I just planted potatoes in bed #1 simply by placing the seed potatoes on the surface and covering with a layer of about 1’ of chips.  So the seed potatoes will be right at the interface of the old chips and the new.  Clouds are clearing so I will try to get some pictures when the lighting improves.

Eric
 
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I went out and got a couple of pictures where the new potatoes are planted.  It is not a huge plot, but they are more dense than typical as I don't need to account for pathways.  Unfortunately the sunlight I was anticipating never arrived so sorry for the poor lighting.

You can see that there is about 8-12" of chips piled on the surface.  There were some low growing weeds, but I don't really care as I will just smother them with woodchips.  If you look carefully at the log used as a garden edge, you can see how wine caps really obliterated it last year.  Next year it gets replaced.

Eric
IMG_5973.JPG
Wood chips on newly planted potatoes
Wood chips on newly planted potatoes
IMG_5974.JPG
Close up of wood chips over potatoes
Close up of wood chips over potatoes
IMG_5976.JPG
Side view of new wood chips over potatoes
Side view of new wood chips over potatoes
 
Eric Hanson
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Just to round things out, today I added wine caps to my comfrey plants.  I have a total of 6 established comfrey plants next to beds 2&3.  I went to bed #1 and dug out one shovel full of aged and decomposed wine cap infused woodchips (former wood chips might be more accurate). There were occasionally pieces of wood here and there, but mostly the bedding looked like coffee grounds.

As I dug up the one scoop, I could still see plenty of little white strands of fungi in the bedding.  As the scoop fell apart as I placed it in a 5 gallon bucket, even more fungi was plainly visible—mostly it was little white threads, while some was white fuzz generally surrounding a little chunk of wood.  I will fill the hole I left with more woodchips later today.

Going back to my comfrey plants, I made a little ring of spawn around each plant.  I then brought over a single 5 gallon bucket full of woodchips that I spread around each comfrey plant.  As it turns out, 5 gallons of woodchips is not all that much. The comfrey does have a nice, thick ring of chips, but I plan to follow up with more chips to really cover the comfrey area with plenty of woodchips in a nice, thick and broad area.

As with the garden beds, the purpose of the wine caps on/near the comfrey is not so much for the mushrooms, but rather to add extra fertility to the comfrey plants themselves.  I realize that comfrey does not really need any extra fertility, but I figure that it cannot hurt.  It will probably take 6-12 months, but that’s fine.  And any mushrooms I get will be a bonus!

Eric
 
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Eric, a picture is worth 1000 words, your tomato bed is the smae as my asparagus beds will be.
Thanks so much.
 
Eric Hanson
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So I have an observation for anyone following this thread.  Today, 4/2/2020, I went out and checked on my woodchips that I sowed last spring in bed#2.  

When I sowed spawn in spring 2018, I did so into chips that were aged and partly broken down, most likely by bacteria.  Last spring when I sowed wine caps in bed#2, I did so into freshly chipped wood.  I used twice as much spawn to inoculate about the same volume of chips and there has definitely been decomposition, but when I checked about an hour ago I did not see as much fungal activity as I thought I would.  The chips were loaded with worms and the bed level has dropped considerably, but I did not see as much white fuzz or white strands.

Part of the reason for not seeing fungal activity might actually be lighting conditions, it being so bright it is a little hard to see into s dark hole—I want to try again when it’s a little cloudier and not so blinding when I look into the holes I dug.  Strangely, I thought I saw more spawn when I checked a couple of weeks ago so the lighting may be an issue.  I have certainly had plenty of rain as of late, and the entire last year was plenty wet.

If the wine caps act like they did last year then I am about 2-3 weeks away from a flush.  It will be interesting to see if things stay close to schedule.  If things don’t stick to schedule, then I suspect that the issue would be a relative lack of bacteria at the time of inoculation.

But even if I don’t get a flush, I still have plenty of compost in the wood complete with loads of worms. Each time I dug into the chips I found multiple worms crawling around.  It will be interesting to see what happens and I will definitely keep this updated.

Eric
 
Eric Hanson
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Update 4/3-4/4 2020

Yesterday (4/3) I went out and poked around some more in bed #2 looking for threads of fungi.  I did see a bit more than the last time and I had a few observations.

1). The bed is overall not as squishy as last year’s bed (bed #1) and the top inch or so of the chips is a bit dry.  It was a warm, sunny, dry and windy day, this being the 3rd in a row after weeks of constant overcast skies and seemingly perpetual rain.  

Last year, my mushroom bed in bed #1 had soft chips all the way to the tops.  But there was an important difference between the two.  Bed #1 got covered in a 2-4 inch layer of straw just after inoculation back in 2018.  Last year after inoculating bed #2 I went to get straw, but apparently there was a straw shortage.  I simply could not find straw anywhere.  I substituted grass clippings for straw thinking they would have the same effect.  After sitting for a year growing fungi, Bed #1 still had a layer of straw by spring of last year.  The grass clippings are mostly gone from Bed #2 this spring and the top inch of chips is much more dry than the same layer in last year’s bed.  It is possible that the fungi did not inhabit this top layer.

2). As I dug down I found many more signs of life.  The lower, deeper chips were more moist, DID have fungi (I dug deeper yesterday than previously) and seethed with worms which is great.  In fact, there are more worms in this lower level than in beds in previous years, so there is plenty of biological activity going on down there.  This is good news.

3). I poked around in bed #3 which was haphazardly inoculated last year and parts actually grew quite well.  I framed the bed this year and dumped a lot of freshly chipped wood on the top to fill up the bed.

I dug in there just to see what was going on and I was rewarded by seeing that the new chips are already being inoculated—quite thoroughly—from the bottom up.  I saw plenty of rewarding white strands of fungi reaching from the lower, older chips into the newer, fresher chips on top.  It will be interesting to see how things work out in this bed.



I can’t tell yet if the signs here are encouraging or discouraging for bed #2.  I am not certain what to think about lower levels of fungi in the upper portions of the bed.  I am wondering if the fungi are getting ready to fruit or if bed #2 will be a bust (for mushrooms) this year.  I will make regular observations, take pictures and pay close attention.

Eric
 
Eric Hanson
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4/6/2020 update.

I recently planted potatoes on bed #1 which grew mushrooms last year.  My technique was simply drop potatoes on the bed surface and cover with 8ish inches of wood chips.  Today I went to check on the potatoes so I dug in a bit and while I didn’t find the potatoes (dog was with me), I could plainly see that recently applied fresh woodchips were covered in white strands of fungi.  It is really surprising just how fast the newly applied (and chipped) woodchips got infected by the wine caps.  I doubt that the chips have been on the bed for more than 3 weeks.  It’s plainly evident that bed #1 is plenty active and alive with wine caps.

I will try to get some pictures soon.

Eric
 
Eric Hanson
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4/9/2020

OOOOOOO!!!

Today I was mowing by my garden beds, and I saw mushrooms!!  

The mushrooms were in bed#1, the first bed I inoculated.  The exciting part is that when I inoculated back in 2018 (actually, just about 2 years ago to the date), I only inoculated about 1/2 of a 32' long bed.  Basically I ran out of spawn to go any further.  The mushrooms I saw today were in a part of the bed NOT inoculated 2 years ago!  I did get some fall mushrooms about 2' from the edge from where I inoculated, but the mushroom furthest was 6-8' from the edge of inoculation based on 2018, or about 5' from where mushrooms emerged from last fall.  It is exciting to see these as it is evidence that I have an active colony growing into new parts of the garden bed.  I might have to call this part of the bed as bed #1b as while it had chips, I did NOTHING to it for the last two years.  It got inoculated all by itself from growth that came from the other half (bed #1a).

There were about 10-12 mushrooms, and most were too big to eat, but I did get 4 that were still edible and they are now in my kitchen!  Yay!

I will follow up with pictures, soon, I just wanted to post this ASAP.

Eric
 
Eric Hanson
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4/14/2020

I planted a second round of potatoes in bed #3.  This bed hosted potatoes last year and in fact some are coming up volunteer.  Normally I would never plant the same crop in the same place two years running.  But only part of the bed grew potatoes and I put down a nice thick layer of chips.

Seems like my my last attempt at potatoes was started under two deep a layer of chips.  I don’t think I will see those producing plants.

Eric
 
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Hi Eric!

Looking good. I am loving the in-depth reporting. I have yet to make a copycat bed following your technique like I said I was going to. Looks like it won't happen until at least this fall.

But, I did just scoop up a truckload of chips to mulch my new garden with and they were well composted, about 50/50 wood to soil mix. I posted a pic in the Victory Gardens thread but it isn't really close enough to see the details. So, how do you think trying to grow some plants directly in those chips would do? I think I am going back to grab just enough chips to plant a "potato tire stack" and a tomato plant into a pot of just these chips, mostly for experimentation's sake. Maybe I'll do 2 of each and feed only one of each to compare results. Promises, promises...

Anyway, I have chased down two different chipper trucks in my neighborhood in the last week. Both guys said they would dump chips at my house. Both let me down... A little frustrating. But! My neighbor, a tree service guy, said he will bring me a dump truck load some day, although his wife interjected with, "those are our chips, hahaha!". They are doing the same thing as me, spreading chips over their entire pad to revitalize the clay sheet we live on and reduce the mud.

Keep up the good work!

 
Jay Angler
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Dan Fish wrote:

So, how do you think trying to grow some plants directly in those chips would do? I think I am going back to grab just enough chips to plant a "potato tire stack"

I tried the tire thing years ago and it never worked and I've since read from several sources, that it didn't work for them either. I would just put down a 3 foot wide row of that lovely sounding material about 4 inches deep, put your spud starts down about a foot apart and cover with more material. Reserve a good pile of the material and add it as they need hilling. This should be better at conserving moisture which was part of the issue when I tried growing spuds vertically - it was just too hard to keep the moisture where I needed it. That said, if you've only got a tire-sized spot to try to grow in, you've not got much to loose.
 
Dan Fish
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Wow thanks! My main problem is moisture conservation and I am glad you brought it up. I should be able to come up with something more along the lines you are recommending somewhere. My problem right now is space but I should be able to rig something up.
 
Eric Hanson
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Dan,

Glad you like the thread.  I like that people get something out of it and even though I am handing out advice, I thought it should just point out that I am still learning as well and I too was once groping in the dark.

I don’t know about the potato tire, I have just heard too many people not have it work out, but Jay covered that pretty well already.

But aside from that, I think you have some good plans.  I know it is hard to get chips from tree services, I have tried.  That’s why I had to chip up my own.  Great thing about wine caps is that they are pretty forgiving.  Please do keep us up to date, I would love to hear how things work out down the road.

Great work so far,

Eric
 
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I am updating this thread today (4/26/2020) with some insight provided to me by Hugo Morvan.  Hugo is building his own mushroom bed by following some basic instructions I have on this site and is actively trying to incorporate live plants into the wine cap growing operation which is just fantastic.  He followed my instructions to a “T”, but then added one further step HERE:

https://permies.com/t/108551/wine-cap-compost-observations#1093304

The step Hugo added was an extremely simple but brilliant addition to the overall growing process and I want to make sure he gets fully credited for this insight.

What Hugo did was build his bed and inoculate as normal, but then added a simple cardboard sheet to the top (with holes cut out for his plantings).  The beauty of this step is that that layer of cardboard really helps regulate the moisture under the cardboard.  His chips were not only moist, the fungus had already spread to the top layer and was even growing through the cardboard!  This is really amazing.  Last year I did not see a meaningful spread of the fungal body for months!  Hugo got it in just a couple of weeks.

On a parallel note I noticed that where I piled a thick (8-12”) layer of chips this year, the fungus grew up in a matter of weeks.  It appears that keeping the wood substrate consistently moist really paves the way for a fast spread of wine caps in the woodchips.  I am going to start placing a cardboard topper where I can as soon as possible.

Eric
 
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4/30/2020

A quick update on bed 1b, or the western half of the bed that I inoculated with wine caps back in 2018.  I just got finished planting some spring veggies with my daughter.  We were planting in the section not inoculated directly (hence the b in the 1b).  As we dug the trenches for the seeds, it was plainly evident that the fungus had already beat us to the area.  We dug out large white sections of fungi and the wood was spongy.  White threads were everywhere and worms crawled all underneath the surface.  I hope to see good vegetable growth.

I think that as the seeds germinate I will go ahead and add a 1-2” layer of fresh chips as a mulch layer.  The other side of the bed (1a) got a fresh 10ish inches of chips which are colonizing rapidly.

I will keep this updated as circumstances develop.

Eric
 
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I built this bed last year specifically for tomatoes. Last fall, I buried a bunch of veggie scraps and several dead chickens in it and then covered it with a thick layer of leaves. Two days ago, I pulled off most of the leaves and added some well aged compost that still has chunks of wood in it (most of my compost does). I found some edible mushrooms in one of the chicken runs that were too mucky to consider eating, so if you look in the back right corner, I've stuck them in the soil in the hopes that they will multiply though this bed. Wish them luck?
2020-Apr-29-just-planted-6-toms-and-some-mushrooms.jpg
2020-Apr-29-just-planted-6-toms-and-some-mushrooms
2020-Apr-29-just-planted-6-toms-and-some-mushrooms
 
Eric Hanson
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Looks nice Jay.
 
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Location: Cincinnati, Ohio,Price Hill 45205
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Great reporting Eric!
You might have mentioned it,  but are you buying new spawn,  making your own or using previously  inoculated woodchips?

Rather off topic, you mentioned planting with your daughter and finding loads of fungus and worms,  and I thought" I wonder if they have seen Nausicaa of the Valley of the Wind?"
It is serious enough that I only showed it to my daughter this year, as she turned 12, but so good it was hard to wait.
The rousing, uplifting adventure of a young female protagonist with a special relationship to the  fungus and invertebrates of her world.
She's like a Permaculture Snow White,  right down to having a following of stumpy grumpy little men.



 
Eric Hanson
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Location: Southern Illinois
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William,

Interesting note about the movie.  I might see if I can find it and maybe talk my daughter into it.

As to your first question, in 2018 I used 2 5.5 lb bags of spawn to inoculate one bed.  Last year I used 4 bags to inoculate my bed#2 and 1.5 bags to inoculate bed#3.  Ironically bed #3 is doing the best.  

At this point I cannot see myself buying any more spawn as I have plenty from existing beds right now.  I even inoculated my woodchips around my comfrey plants with some already decomposed and inoculated compost left over from my bed#1.

Last year I was skeptical about using compost from my first bed to start my new beds, but now I have built up enough of a spawn base in my beds that I no longer care about a few missing shovel fulls that will promptly be fed by new chips.

Regarding the bed from my last post, that was bed 1b, or the uninoculated side of bed #1.  The spawn simply grew—several feet—from one side to the other.

I hope I was clear here.  I had a cat rubbing my arms while typing on my phone!

Eric  
 
Eric Hanson
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Location: Southern Illinois
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Update, 5/21/2020

Last week (call it about 5/12/2020) I got my tomatoes planted in my bed #2.  I need to get some pictures of this bed in here, but it will have to be a better day for taking pictures, but I have finally got my fence/gates around my bed #2 to protect it from deer and bunnies.  I planted tomatoes and as I dug the holes, the chips were riddled with white strands of fungi, presumably wine caps.  This is a significant turn of events from about a month ago when fungal strands were largely absent from the upper layer though still plentiful several inches below the surface.  I have to assume that the conditions for growing improved radically in the last month.  And it has been a wet, cool, cloudy, rainy May thus far.  Who knows, I may still get a late flush of wine caps.  The chips had generally decayed to the point that they looked like coffee grounds.  As I checked on my tomatoes earlier today, they are doing well despite the cool weather.  Still no signs from the sweet potato slips, but that is not unsurprising.  

Two days ago I partially topped off the chips.  The surface level dropped significantly over winter, especially by the raised bed edges, where I added about 5' of new chips just to level out the pile.  There are weeds-a-plenty growing in the bed, so in the next couple of days I will lay down some cardboard or paper and cover with another 2-4 inches of chips in order to really smother the weeds and bring the chip bed back up to at least the top of the bed edges and possibly a couple of inches more.  Given how fast the fungal strands are growing in the bed, and also thanks to Hugo's discovery about how fast fungi spreads under a layer of cardboard, I am sure that the new chips will be wine cap food in no time.

I just thought I would offer a little update, and I promise to get pictures sent in soon.

Eric
 
Joe Grand
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I just got this email:
TIP: Word of caution, once the earth worms learn where the mycelium is, they will come for it, so moving the bed each year to another location might be a good idea, if you are looking to eat mushrooms.
https://mushroommountain.com/king-stropharia-the-garden-giant/


 
Eric Hanson
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Location: Southern Illinois
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Joe,

Thanks for the tip.  My primary goal in having mushrooms is to have the excellent bedding it provides.  The actual mushrooms for eating are a tasty side benefit.  But if my wine caps indeed attract worms, then I am more than happy.  And from the looks of things, the worms have found me!

Eric
 
Joe Grand
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I have nothing but good things to say about earthworms, but I want the mushrooms too.
So I may have to find a way to control the worms, I know this is garden baspheming, but I have fire ants so I have to grow earthworms in a container/bathtub to get any castigs.
Therefore I do not need them competing with the myciluim, which will keep the beds full of compost.
So I may have to put screen wire around the mycilium beds or it may not be problem after all.
What I need is more reseach & if iI find that the problem is minor or a solution I will post it.
 
Without subsidies, chem-ag food costs four times more than organic. Or this tiny ad:
permaculture bootcamp - learn permaculture through a little hard work
https://permies.com/t/bootcamp
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