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Help planning for wood stove

 
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Hi all!

I am starting to plan a wood stove.  I am looking at this model:
https://morsoe.com/us/product/indoor/wood-burning-stove/p2bclassic_us

It will be perfect to supplement my small home heat.

First thing in my plan is to plan out the clearances and chimney piping.  

See pics below.

I am thinking of removing this window, and routing the stove pipe out the right side of the window opening, then filling in the left side with glass block.

I would move all the stuff below the window so that should give me lots of space for clearance.

I am just wondering about any suggestions and what I should be thinking about before I do it.

Specifically, the routing of the stove pipe inside the house and outside, so that I am safe and pass codes.

On the outside, I think I would have to go on an angle, maybe 45 degrees for a short way, in order to get around the 1st floor window which is above the basement window.

Would that be OK for the airflow?  And with codes?  And how far up the house do I need the chimney to go?  How do I find the codes?

Thanks!



 
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Hi Bradley!  Welcome to Permies!
That is one pretty stove your looking at!  
Your plan on going out a window has been done many times, although it is better to go straight up thru the roof.

One thing you should be aware of, is outside the window you will need insulated pipe.   Also that pipe needs to go above the roof line to  draft properly...  Metalbestos pipe is not cheap!
If you choose to try single wall pipe , you will have bad creosote issues as well as less draft , more effected by wind gusts.
You would need a cleanout outside that you cleaned at least once a month, if not every few weeks.

So , my recommendation would be to go straight up. If that can't happen and you really want a forever wood stove then a block chimney is next best.
When that costs too much, next best would be the window and insulated pipe .

Absolute last choice for me would be stick it out the window go single wall however high you wish... then watch it like a hawk so there are no unintended fires anywhere.
 
Bradley Good
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Thanks!  I can't go straight up because its going to be in the basement and I would have to go thru the 1st and 2nd floor and roof...too much work.  And I may move from here in 10 years or less so I don't want to do anything so permanent.  

I think the double walled Metalbestos sounds like the best option.

Do you have any ideas about the angle to get around that window?  Would that be an issue with draft or anything?
 
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Outside chimneys tend to draft poorer than inside ones.  Angles when they're outside make things even worse.  If you need to angle it, I'd attempt the shallowest angle possible.  Not sure if they make 22.5 degree bends but that would be much better than a 45.
 
Bradley Good
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OK well if I send it through the house I guess another benefit would be keeping that heat inside right?  And it would be right in the cold corner of my living room and bedroom.

How much work would that be and what type of pipe?  Single wall for inside?  Or do I need to build a masonry chimney inside?

Thanks
 
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A few thoughts come to mind:

1) plan on how you are going to get fire wood INTO the basement, hopefully you have a walk in basement or bulkhead access. In my case, I have to toss it through the basement window (similar to yours) and it is a total PITA.
Firewood is messy & heavy, but I can get it for free so I just deal with it.

2) If you are going to build to code, I believe there are min clearance requirements from top of pipe to basement ceiling that will not meet code if you plan on routing the pipe through that window. I think it's at least 15" here, maybe 18". Best to check your local building code.

3) Routing the pipe inside will be better for heat retention/draft/cleaning ...I'd guess you will need at least double wall pipe (metalbestose). It is not cheap, unless you can find used.

4) I didn't check out the stove you had in mind, but perhaps consider a corn or pellet stove. They can be direct-vented through a wall and maybe keep it in your living room instead of the basement? Perhaps you could vent that though the basement window and meet code. Drawbacks are they require power to operate. Upside, no splitting wood, no bugs/debris, much cleaner burning, less ash produced. The people I know who have them, love them.


 
thomas rubino
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Hey Bradley;
If you choose to run your chimney straight up and staying indoors. This is the optimum choice.  
As Pete suggested All metalbestos would be good, but... you can use single wall away from combustibles. Passing thru floors  and the roof are minimum.
Anyplace a child (young or old) could put a hand on it should be insulated.

Here is a link to a post on Permies)  https://permies.com/t/137208/Uncle-Mud-Liberator-Rocket-Mass
This is an interesting stove.It can be connected to a mass.  It might work well for you in a basement.  
\Uncle Mud is a master builder, if he recommends this stove after trying it for over 3 years then its worth your time to check it out.
 
Bradley Good
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Thanks for the ideas!

I don't want to do any significant construction here since I may move in the near future.  So I'm willing to lose efficiency and be able to tear it all out and take it with me.  I'm looking to add a little heat to the house with free wood that I always gather, cut and split myself.  I don't need to heat the whole house or at all.  This is just extra and backup.
 
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Vertical height will make up for many draft reducers, a 30 or 45 degree (less is better!) angle will draft better than a flat transition.
Frankly a pull all the way from the basement to the peak (or at least 4' above any wind obstruction is probably at least 25' +, you'll probably have plenty of draft once heated.
The difficulty is in getting the draft started if the pipe is cold, and reversal of draft is not unlikely.
If you have a tall stairwell, a tight fitting door at the bottom would be a good addition as the stairwell will act as a preheated "chimney" and comfortably use the chimney as fresh air supply....
One final caveat; make sure you buy chimney, and not fresh air ducting for your link to your Metalbestos as ducting is galvanized and heated zinc offgases toxic fumes.
Single wall pipe no matter where its installed has a very short life if its used even as a short indoor connection link keep an eye on it for pinholes
 
Bradley Good
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I thought the height would make up for draft reducers!  I hear you about less angle the better thanks.

I don't have a wall on the one side of my basement stairwell, and don't want to do construction as I may move sometime in the near future.  I'm not sure I understand what you are saying, other than it will be difficult to get the draft started.  I was thinking if I opened the back door to the outside, and let cold air run down the basement steps while lighting the stove that would help.  And maybe with some lit rolled paper held up in the top of the stove at the exhaust....that's what I've done before for fireplaces and wood stoves.

I'm considering Duravent triple walled galvanized chimney pipe and the Duravent thru the wall kit.

For the inside, I was considering using double or triple walled pipe to keep it cool because I don't want anything hot with that low basement ceiling.  

I'm not sure I understood everything you said so if I've got something wrong please clarify.

Thanks.

 
Bradley Good
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I just measured - from the bottom of the basement window to the top of the roof is 24'.  Plus about 3 feet above the roof, plus there are 2 items within 10 feet that are 2 feet high, so I'm figuring I have to go 4-5 feet above the roof, depending on what the code guy says.  So roughly 30 feet.
 
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