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Anyone know what this pesty vine is?

 
Posts: 52
Location: Jersey Shore PA
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This vine popped up in my pumpkin patch around the start of July.  I've been busy and neglected the patch for a couple weeks and it's trying to take over. I've never seen a vine like it on the property and neither has my Dad. It roots very deep. Anyone know what it may be and how much trouble I'm in?
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gardener
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It kind of reminds me of Climbing False Buckwheat. https://www.minnesotawildflowers.info/flower/climbing-false-buckwheat
Could it be that?
Can't see the flowers in the pictures super well, I know it's hard to photograph ones that small. Or perhaps it's one of it's cousins, Black Bindweed or Fringed Black Bindweed?
 
Kj Koch
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The leaves are similar but It doesn't twine like they show. Maybe something in the same family. Time to fall down the bindweed rabbit hole lol
Thank you for your input!
 
Heather Sharpe
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Interesting. I noticed last year, even the hedge bindweed couldn't manage to twine around pumpkin leaves or their stems. Though it sure climbed everything else. I wonder if something about pumpkins makes those plants behave differently? Or it might just be a different plant. Can you get a closer picture of the flower? That can really help with identification.
Of course! I love a good plant mystery. Hope you figure it out and it's not one of the more poorly behaved bindweed family members!
 
pollinator
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Location: Japan, roughly zone 9b - wet and warm climate
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The leaf shape definitely suggests morning glory family, but those aren't the bindweed flowers I'm familiar with. It looks more similar to japanese yamaimo, though I don't think that's what it is either. Did you try a plant ID application like google lens?
 
Kj Koch
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I was thinking morning glory at first too but I've changed my mind. It don't seem to climb like they do. I've not tried a app yet but may give it a go.
 
Kj Koch
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Heather Sharpe wrote:Interesting. I noticed last year, even the hedge bindweed couldn't manage to twine around pumpkin leaves or their stems. Though it sure climbed everything else. I wonder if something about pumpkins makes those plants behave differently? Or it might just be a different plant. Can you get a closer picture of the flower? That can really help with identification.
Of course! I love a good plant mystery. Hope you figure it out and it's not one of the more poorly behaved bindweed family members!



Oh that's interesting indeed. I have some corn in one end of my patch, I haven't gotten into it yet but I will definitely be interested in seeing if it climbed that at all.
I'll try to get a better picture of the flowers tomorrow. They are so tiny though.
 
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Is it very wet where this plant is growing?

How many petals do the flowers have? And the stamens?

Looks similar to the Sagittaria family which is a water plantain.

If it is in the bindweed family maybe it is a cuscuta or a dodder:



Source
 
pioneer
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do you have a cat? And does it like the vine? It kinda looks like it could be in the silver vine family. Lovely catnip alternative with early seed pods very tasty similar to young milkweed pods.
 
Kj Koch
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Anne Miller wrote:Is it very wet where this plant is growing?

How many petals do the flowers have? And the stamens?

Looks similar to the Sagittaria family which is a water plantain.

If it is in the bindweed family maybe it is a cuscuta or a dodder:



Source



Definitely not a wet area. I'll have to take a closer look tomorrow to see if I can count the petals
 
Kj Koch
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Rebecca Fussner wrote:do you have a cat? And does it like the vine? It kinda looks like it could be in the silver vine family. Lovely catnip alternative with early seed pods very tasty similar to young milkweed pods.



I'll see if I can get one of our cats to come with me tomorrow 🐱
 
pollinator
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It’s field bindweed. It’s incredibly invasive.  It s not a good playmate.
 
pollinator
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That is wild buckwheat, the flowers are the easiest way to tell it from bindweed.
 
Janet Reed
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Hmmmm…..
 
pollinator
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If it were here that would be black bindweed Fallopia convolvulus It's an annual not the worst thing in the world, it's also edible I do keep it down but I don't think it will do much harm to pumpkins.

Edit; Also called wild buckwheat.  which is why people are calling it both bindweed and buckwheat, local names are a menace.
 
Kj Koch
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I honestly don't think it's Buckwheat. It just kinda lays on the ground or occasionally over top the pumpkin vines. The pictures I'm seeing of Buckwheat show the flowers in "stalks" pointing up in the air.
I do believe it is a Bindweed of some sorta. I gave the chickens some yesterday and they seem to like it so there's that.
 
Rebecca Fussner
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when in doubt pull some out and head to the local county ag office.
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