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Best book for learning about biodynamics?

 
Mother Tree
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I'm looking for suggestions for a really good book on biodynamics that would be of interest to permies members. I'd love to find a book with an author who'd be willing to come and do a promotion for us here, so it would need to be written an English speaking author, not one that's been translated from another language. And ideally an author who could inspire some really good discussion here.

Any suggestions?
 
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Location: Arkansas Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep loam/clay with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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Burra, I have no suggestions for really good biodynamic books, just a book on biodynamic gardening that I would probably put more energy into reading if someone said it was a "good" one...what I have read of it I like....published by Biodynamic Literature, it is called "Culture and Horticulture...a Philosophy of Gardening" by Wolf D. Storl from 1979 .
 
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Location: Skowhegan, Maine
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I read "Secrets of the Soil" a while ago, and thoroughly enjoyed it. I can recommend it to learn about biodynamics.
 
                                
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Location: Western Pennsylvania
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Each year I purchase two calenders:

In Tune with the Moon, 2012, 2013 etc.

and the North American Biodynamic Sowing and Planting Calender, 2013 etc.

these both break down the moon cycles etc with some really great graphs and help with your gardening plan.
 
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A Biodynamic Farm by Hugh Lovel
 
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I found the book "How to Grow More Vegetables*, *(and fruit, nuts, berries, grains and other crops) Than You Ever Thought Possible On Less Land Than You Can Imagine" by John Jeavons was a great book to get started with the biointensive style of growing food, which I figure is similar to the biodynamic method.
 
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William Toles wrote:I read "Secrets of the Soil" a while ago, and thoroughly enjoyed it. I can recommend it to learn about biodynamics.



Great book. Really opened my eyes up to looking at the big picture when it comes to gardening.
 
pollinator
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ok I just ordered the North American 2013 calendar mentioned above and the book Secrets of the soil....never stop learning I say....

I used to get a magazine with the phases of the moon info in it but couldn't afford to continue it..maybe I'll try to resubscribe to it someday soon ?? but will read these when they come and try this out a bit this next year to see if it makes any difference..

I do garden in food forest plan..so I'm not sure if they are going to work together or not, but can't hurt to try
 
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I would use the Biodynamic calendar 2013 for practical use and Secrets of the soil as suggested before for theory (and later practice)
 
Brenda Groth
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i have read both Secrets of the soil and also How to grow more vegetables..jeavons..and prefer the latter.

Both have good info and both cover different subjects..the first one being more "permie" friendly and the second one more "intensive gardening" friendly..

second is avail as a free download ..see the thread where it is mentioned
 
Mark Wells
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Brenda Groth wrote:i have read both Secrets of the soil and also How to grow more vegetables..jeavons..and prefer the latter.

Both have good info and both cover different subjects..the first one being more "permie" friendly and the second one more "intensive gardening" friendly..

second is avail as a free download ..see the thread where it is mentioned



Thank you, i will check out intensive gardening asap!
 
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I would specifically NOT recommend the "Secrets of the Soil." It is rambling and is not a good introduction to practical biodynamics. Most of the book you will never be able to apply, even if you think it is good science.

Instead, read anything by E. Pfeiffer:

"Introduction to Biodynamics"
"Weeds and What They Tell Us"
"Soil Fertility, Renewal & Preservation" (this last one is available for free here: http://www.soilandhealth.org/01aglibrary/01aglibwelcome.html )

Or H.H. Koepf:

"Bio-Dynamics: An Introduction" (available at same link above)

Or Maria Thun:

"The Biodynamic Year: Increasing Yield, Quality & Flavor: 100 helpful tips for the gardener or smallholder" (available for free here: http://books.google.com/books?id=p7zVfzXOL4UC&printsec=frontcover&output=html_text&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0 )

The one by Maria Thun is exceptionally accessible and has pretty pictures.

 
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I enjoyed my

" Teaming with Microbes "

As my introductory book, it's written for the layman not scientists
 
author
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+2 for Soil Fertility by E. Pfeifer

I just finished reading it, and reccomed it highly. I have been a practicing Biodynamic farmer for the past 8 years. This book is straightforward, practical, insightful, and compelling. If you are at all curious about Biodynamics, give it a read.
Biodynamics can seem difficult to get into. Steiner is so far out, and many books are etherial at the expense of being practical. This book is the middle path, I cant reccomend it enough.

Go Biodynamics! Grow Biodynamic!
 
pollinator
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Thanks for all the suggestions this is my simi start to looking more so into biodynamics
 
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I have read all of the books here, and find " A Biodynamic Farm" the most readible for a dummy like me.

Mr Lovell is actually alive and still speaking, and writing, as well. His website is quantam agricultural. I recently ordered his newest book, but I have not recieved it as of yet.

Mr. Jeavons still speaks and tours as well, and while I personally practice a form of gardening close to mr.Jeavons, it aint biodynamics. Biointensive is similar in some ways, but not biodynamics.

Biointensive and biodynamics both look at the big picture, but biointensive does not address the "spiritual", while biodynamics embraces it.

I will say that there is tons of info out there on both methods, but you gotta kinda dig for it. There are not a lot of self promoters.
 
Cee Ray
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Hugh's new book is even better than his first one, highly recommended.

http://quantumagriculture.com/quantum-agriculture-biodynamics-and-beyond
 
Adam Klaus
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I like 'Grasp the Nettle' by Peter Proctor. It can be ordered through Grow Biointensive, John Jeavon's seed company.

It provides a good overview, with plenty of philosophy without being too far out.
 
gardener
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biodynamics references list This is a good list of reference materials for anyone interested in biodynamic farming/gardening

This is a pretty comprehensive list of books on biodynamics

Koepf, H.H., Shouldice, R., and W. Goldstein. 1989. The Biodynamic Farm: Agriculture in the Service of the Earth and Humanity. Anthroposophic Press. Hudson, NY. 245 pp.

Koepf, H. 1993. Research in Biodynamic Agriculture: Methods and Results. Bio-Dynamic Farming & Gardening Association.

Kolisko, E. and L. Kolisko. 1978. Agriculture of Tomorrow. 2nd edition. Bournemouth, U.K. Kolisko Archive Publications.

Pfeiffer, E. 2008. Soil Fertility - Renewal and Preservation. Lanthorn Press.

Pfeiffer, E.E. 1980. Chromatography Applied to Quality Testing. Bio-Dynamic Farming & Gardening Association.

Schwenk, T. 1988. The Basis of Potentization Research.

Seamon, D. and A. Zajonc (eds.). 1998. Goethe’s Way of Science: A Phenomenology of Nature.

Steiner, R. 1910. Occult Science: An Outline. Translated by George and Mary Adams. Rudolf Steiner Press 2005.

Steiner, R. 1996. The Boundaries of Natural Science. Eight Lectures. 1920. Dornach. Foreword by Saul Bellow.

Steiner, R. 1993. Spiritual Foundations for the Renewal of Agriculture. A Course of Lectures. 1924. Translated by C.E. Creeger and M.Gardner. Bio-Dynamic Farming and Gardening Association. Kimberton, Pennsylvania.
 
Stewart Lundy
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I second Hugh Lovel's book "Quantum Agriculture" though he is very much an innovator. There are so many things going on in his head that it would be virtually impossible to say what part does what. His "tree paste" recipe is quite elaborate -- which tells you what kind of "chef" he is in the garden! He is a delightful speaker and has quite an appetite for experimentation.
 
gardener
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I just read Monty Waldin's "BIodynamic Gardening" and it is an outstanding introduction to Biodynamics. It goes through all of the preparations and why they are used. It also has a calendar. Most importantly, it's easy to understand.
John S
PDX OR
 
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i am currently reading biodynamic gardening and am really enjoying it. it is very clear. the pictures and step by step directions make trying things out very easy.
quick question, though, if you live in the suburbs, where do you get your stag bladder and cow's horns with manure?

 
John Suavecito
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Most states and some provinces have biodynamic groups. You show up on the arranged date to help make the preps and they make it easy for you. It is a cooperative group.  
https://www.biodynamics.com/what-is-biodynamics
John S
PDX OR
 
pollinator
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I am reading secrets of the soil and while inspriational it does not help with practical gardening. Jeavons is not biodynamic at all. I actually want a biodynamic book which is an introduction of the principles as well as practical. Stirl is a good writer but the book is old and he writes both in German and English.
 
Kristen Schroder
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John Saltveit wrote:Most states and some provinces have biodynamic groups. You show up on the arranged date to help make the preps and they make it easy for you. It is a cooperative group.  
https://www.biodynamics.com/what-is-biodynamics
John S
PDX OR



I would LOVE that. but texas doesn't have an organization. the closest one listed, that i could find, is almost 8 hours away by car in louisiana. :/
 
John Suavecito
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They will probably mail them to you. It will be more expensive because you didn't work on them.
John S
PDX OR
 
Did Steve tell you that? Fuh - Steve. Just look at this tiny ad:
Dave Burton's Boot Adventures at Wheaton Labs and Basecamp
https://permies.com/t/119676/permaculture-projects/Dave-Burton-Boot-Adventures-Wheaton
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