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Show Us What You Are Hauling in Your Wheelbarrow

 
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Inspired by the awesome Show Us What You Are Hauling On Your Bike thread, I thought I'd start one about showing off what you've hauled in a wheelbarrow.

I don't have a bike cart, or a trailer, or a go-kart, or a truck. I just have a wheelbarrow. But, I've often been surprised by just what I can haul in the thing!

My favorite thing to haul in a wheelbarrow is bramble cuttings. I have a lot of salmonberry canes. And I've found that if I make a kind of bed of small branches in the bottom of my wheelbarrow, I can then stick in an amazing amount of canes vertically, especially if I go at various angles. It's half like weaving and half like putting flowers in an arrangement. In the end, it's rather stable and actually comes out in one big clump. And, it doesn't take much time, because you're already handling the bramble, so you just shove it in there as you prune, and then wheel the whole mass away! I've even loaded up my wheelbarrow like this, and then wheeled it half a mile down the road to give to my neighbors goats. No gasoline required!

wheelbarrow full of salmonberry bramble branches that were pruned
Not even my biggest haul of salmonberry canes, but it started to rain


Bramble with the leaves on. The pile is as tall as me, but I could still fit a lot more in there, and taller, too!


Share pictures of the things YOU'VE managed to haul in your wheelbarrow!
 
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I don't have a picture of it but I think the most "different" thing I have transported in a wheelbarrow was a replacement gas tank, The car was dead and the shop was 1km away and the tank weighs 24kg when full and 13kg when empty. I used our 4 wheeled wheelbarrow for that job, it's heavier to pull but you don't need to hold it up and it's easier for long straight lines and navigating railway tracks!

I can see I take very few photos of the wheelbarrow I can only find one in about 5 and it's having a rest in 2 of those.
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New use for old roofing
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Brambles
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Potatoes
 
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Nicole Alderman wrote:
My favorite thing to haul in a wheelbarrow is bramble cuttings. I have a lot of salmonberry canes. And I've found that if I make a kind of bed of small branches in the bottom of my wheelbarrow, I can then stick in an amazing amount of canes vertically, especially if I go at various angles. It's half like weaving and half like putting flowers in an arrangement. In the end, it's rather stable and actually comes out in one big clump. And, it doesn't take much time, because you're already handling the bramble, so you just shove it in there as you prune, and then wheel the whole mass away! I've even loaded up my wheelbarrow like this, and then wheeled it half a mile down the road to give to my neighbors goats. No gasoline required!



You just changed how I'm going to transport blackberry canes next time! I've been working on cutting back a large wild patch that doesn't produce well (full sun and dry soil), and it was taking multiple trips because I was trying to lay all of the canes horizontal. It could only go so high before getting top heavy and wanting to topple out.
 
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