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what months are wild rabbits edible?  RSS feed

 
pollinator
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i know when it is warm you shouldn't eat wild rabbits..but that you can kill and eat them in winter..but i'm not sure when that winter officiall begins and ends for the rabbit population?
 
master steward
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According to Michigan Department of Natural Resources, the Cottontail Rabbit and Snowshoe Hare season is Sept. 15 - Mar. 31. I don't know if those are the wild rabbits you're asking about, but that's what I could find out (https://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-153-10363-312005--,00.html). I hope that helps!
 
pollinator
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In the UK Jan , Feb, March ,April , May , June , July ,Aug , Sept , Oct , Nov and Dec ask any land owner

David
 
gardener
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We just used first snowfall and when the lilacs bloomed as our window.
 
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Why would they not be edible?? I've eaten rabbits here in the uk year round.
 
author
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We say if the month has an 'R', then it is rabbit eatin month. So September through April.

Reason is potential parasite contamination during the warm months.

That's what our old timers say around here in the Rocky Mountains.
 
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Nicole Alderman wrote:According to Michigan Department of Natural Resources, the Cottontail Rabbit and Snowshoe Hare season is Sept. 15 - Mar. 31. I don't know if those are the wild rabbits you're asking about, but that's what I could find out (https://www.michigan.gov/dnr/0,4570,7-153-10363-312005--,00.html). I hope that helps!



Yep, you've got till the end of the month. around my place, I haven't been seeing them lately. Seems like the hawks are getting them all (I see a little fur on the snow sometimes).

Also, i learned this year that you can take any number of small game with a rimfire (.22) rifle on your own land, with no license.

Small game are rabbits, squirrel, thirteen-lined ground squirrel (that's my favorite, just for the name), crow, and a couple other.

If you're hunting them elsewhere, you need the small game license which, at least a couple years ago, was $15.
 
Mike Cantrell
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Michael Cox wrote:Why would they not be edible?? I've eaten rabbits here in the uk year round.



Here, they carry Tularemia, but I can't seem to find the connection between transmission of the disease and cold vs. hot weather.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tularemia :
"Tularemia (or tularaemia; also known as Pahvant Valley plague,[1] rabbit fever,[1] deer fly fever, and Ohara's fever[2]) is a serious infectious disease caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis.[3] A gram-negative, nonmotile coccobacillus, the bacterium has several subspecies with varying degrees of virulence. The most important of those is F. tularensis tularensis (Type A), which is found in lagomorphs (rabbits, hares and pikas) in North America, and it is highly virulent in humans and domestic rabbits."
 
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Why don't domestic rabbits get it? Could pastured rabbits get it?
 
Brenda Groth
pollinator
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Thanks for the welcome back..I've been around but my computer was crap..Now my son bought me a cell signal booster so I can get 4 bars on my phone in my house rather than 0 to 1..and my phone is my modem for my computer.

I love being able to use my computer more again..but alas still way busy ..i want to get some updates on my blog soon as well

Yes it is a disease problem,and I THOUGHT it was months with R's but I wasn't sure..we have some HUGE rabbits here ! (cottontails)
 
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