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What do you know about sorghum?  RSS feed

 
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I was excited to stumble into this thread while searching for information on Sorghum. I also live in Nova Scotia, and right on the coast - sounds like we have a lot in common Heather Holm. I have several stalks of what appears to be sorghum that mysteriously appeared in one of the hugle beds. Exciting! It looks to be quite vigorous and loaded with seeds. I am planning to harvest and save the seeds for next year unless advised otherwise. Any feedback will be most appreciated as this plant is completely new  to me.
 
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Location: North Okanagan BC,Canada
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Last winter I was planning on growing Sweet Sorghum here in BC and wondered if anybody had grown it in Canada. I came across this thread as a guest and was pleased to see it could grow in Nova Scotia.
I purchased some Sugar Drip from seedman.com and planted it next to some Floriana Corn in mid May. Both the Corn and the Sorghum grew well even with the constant haze from the forest fires in BC and Washington state.
I bought a inexpensive hand crank press from Ebay and ran the stalks through the press in late Sept. All told we got 6 quarts of syrup and we use it for baking and on top of pancakes made from the corn. There were plenty of seeds left over for this year and gave some to neighbours the other day and they will have use of our press also.

I joined and posted to thank those who posted so I could learn as well as be a help to somebody else wondering if Sweet Sorghum grows in Canada.
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Sorghum 2017
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Stalks and the hound
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Press
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juice
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boil down
 
jenni blackmore
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Yay Paul! Thanks for the information on sorghum, and the pictures. The plants I discovered volunteering in one of my beds were only a quarter the height of yours so now I'm wondering! Mini sorghum? Or not sorghum at all? In the meantime I opened the sample of syrup I brought home from Texas and I totally love the taste. It reminds me of the treacle I used to have, growing up in England. Now I really want to produce some but presently the beds are covered with a couple of feet of snow so it's hard to imagine anything growing - just lucky I'm a dreamer. J
 
Posts: 113
Location: Taylorsville Kentucky
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Ya'll. I've got a friend here in KY that grows a bunch of Sorghum. They started a new family tradition. Everyone harvest, presses and makes syrup together. Last year they didn't know what to do with the leftover stalks. So a friend of theirs let them dump it all down in a hollar. I was wondering what uses they might be on my permaculture farm for the spent canes. I don't have animals to graze it yet. Mulch? Fibers for cob structures? Will is break down in compost? I'd like to let them dump it all here in about a month if I can use it. Thanks.
 
pollinator
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Wow!! i was looking for info since I just put in some sorghum seed to soak before planting (not sure what exactly I'm planting it for, I figure the rabbits could eat it if nothing else).
I bought it as birdseed (it's red). I do have a sugarcane press, so I may have to experiment.
Glad for the advice to plant together with legumes, would not have guessed. More peas!
 
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Ray,

I use those large stalks from corn, sorghum and pampas grass as a boundary on the hugels so that the vines (bindweed, honeysuckle, etc) take longer to invade. My hope is that by the time they make it in there, I have long term plantings that will take most of the light. I am trialling comfrey as a border/rhyzome barrier as well, but I don't have enough comfrey yet to do all the hugels.

I will try to take a picture by the hugel where it is still visible.
 
Ray Cecil
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Location: Taylorsville Kentucky
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Tj Jefferson wrote:Ray,

I use those large stalks from corn, sorghum and pampas grass as a boundary on the hugels so that the vines (bindweed, honeysuckle, etc) take longer to invade. My hope is that by the time they make it in there, I have long term plantings that will take most of the light. I am trialling comfrey as a border/rhyzome barrier as well, but I don't have enough comfrey yet to do all the hugels.

I will try to take a picture by the hugel where it is still visible.



TJ, that is a good idea.

So far I do not see much use for the left over canes after processing for juice. I might have to get their left over canes and do some experimentation. I'm thinking send them through the chipper after they have dried out a bunch and see if I can make material than can be spread as mulch to suppress the poison ivy growth in my little patch of woods. A little vinegar and dish soap, plus a heavy coat of chipped/shredded sorgham stalks. That might help. My woods is so overgrown with understory, its impossible to use the area for anything. I'm going to have to get the gravely brush hog in there and then mulch.
 
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