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Uses for 2+ feet of snow

 
Joshua Myrvaagnes
pollinator
Posts: 543
Location: Massachusetts, 6b, urban, nearish coast, 39'x60' minus the house, mostly shady north side, + lead.
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You could dig some temporary swales in it to see how the water flows when it starts melting. Had a sense there's some good potential in this idea, not sure yet what this can be useful for but I sense the potential. And we have plenty of ...opportunity in New England at the moment. (Spent a bunch of yesterday relocating Mt. Rushmore from housemate's parking space to Mt. Everest in our yard).
 
Matu Collins
Posts: 1976
Location: Southern New England, seaside, avg yearly rainfall 41.91 in, zone 6b
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My friends in Boston are oppressed by the stuff. Some neighborhoods have trucks carrying loads of snow out!

Habitat for children is my favorite use. Forts! King of the mountain! Something to whack with a stick!

 
Tina Paxton
Posts: 283
Location: coastal southeast North Carolina
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Matu Collins wrote:My friends in Boston are oppressed by the stuff. Some neighborhoods have trucks carrying loads of snow out!

Habitat for children is my favorite use. Forts! King of the mountain! Something to whack with a stick!



Memories of childhood spend at various northerly AFBases...SNOW FORTS ROCK!! Wishing I was a kid in Boston right now because the seriously awesome maze that could be created would be A-MAZ-ING!!

As adults OTOH, what a total PITA....except that it does act as insulation so perhaps drifting it up against the exterior of the dwelling and barns....
 
Nick Kitchener
Posts: 465
Location: Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada
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Just be careful that Mt Everest doesn't move into your basement come springtime...
 
Jennifer Wadsworth
Posts: 2679
Location: Phoenix, AZ (9b)
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Any truckloads of snow can be delivered here to the desert SW. Of course it's supposed to be 80 here today so basically you'd just be a mobile swimming pool.
 
Dave Burton
pollinator
Posts: 1026
Location: Greater Houston, TX US Hardy:9a Annual Precipitation: 44.78" Wind:13.23mph Temperature:42.5-95F
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I don't remember the TEDtalk or video where I heard this idea from: snow can be used residentially and in cities to map the flow and useage patterns of streets and roads.

On tangent, the levels of snow on your property may be useful for determining where the "hotspots" and "cold-spots" are on your land. The rate at which the snow melts may also help with finding the hot and cold spots.
Where snow slides to might help determine the slope, and watching the tracks in the snow might help track the flow of people and other organisms on your land.
Free refrigerators could be made form snow! Or an army of snow men to protect your home! mwahahahaha!
 
Dale Hodgins
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Posts: 6139
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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Mt. Revelstoke in BC, Canada averages about 53 ft. of snow annually. The town gets less, but still over 30 ft. some years.

People dig spring drainage trenches. Kids get snow days. Avalanche reports are as common as traffic reports in the city.
 
Jonathan Davis
Posts: 19
Location: North Central Ohio
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Try a Quinzhee! We build one each year in Northern Ohio using our Lake-effect snow. When you illuminate from inside with a candle, the whole thing glows from the outside. They are awesome! ...just remember to vent them and to have someone watch over you when you are first digging it out...
 
Landon Sunrich
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Location: Western Washington
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Igloo Insulation?

I
 
Niko Economides
Posts: 26
Location: Marquette county Michigan's upper peninsula
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We have 2 miles of road to blow out and we get between 200-300" of snow a year. I try to strategically blow the snow (I can aim the blower) to brush piles placed near groups of favored nut trees. If I want to get fancy I dump urine soaked sawdust on the road and blow that into the area with nut trees.
 
Craig Dobbelyu
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Location: Maine (zone 5)
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Niko Economides wrote:We have 2 miles of road to blow out and we get between 200-300" of snow a year. I try to strategically blow the snow (I can aim the blower) to brush piles placed near groups of favored nut trees. If I want to get fancy I dump urine soaked sawdust on the road and blow that into the area with nut trees.


I do pretty much the same thing. When possible, I'll empty the ash bin from the wood stove along with chicken litter (shavings and poop) from the coop all along the driveway above my young food forest. I just sprinkle it evenly on the top of the snow, then hit it with the snow blower. When it all melts in the spring there's a little extra nutrient, water, minerals, and mulch on the garden as well as a slight pH adjustment. The ashes also help to darken the snow so that it melts faster in the spring, giving me clear ground before any of my neighbors. On average I can plant about 2 weeks earlier than them due to this fact along with other techniques.


More than 4 feet of snow have fallen here in the last 2 weeks and we're expecting another foot this weekend. Sadly, my snow blower is having some traction issues and I need to get out there and make some adjustments before the snow flies again.


One more good snow storm and the pigs will be able to walk right over their fence tops. One jumped over yesterday. Got out but couldn't get back in on her own. I had two plans... make a ramp from bails of hay and hope she's smart enough to use it or... Bacon. I can't believe the hay thing actually worked. At least I don't have to slaughter a pig in 2 degree weather.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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Landon Sunrich
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Location: Western Washington
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Dale,

I remember back in 97 or 98, I think it was 98, We got almost 2 feet of snow overnight and it all melted by the next afternoon, the roads where washed out for weeks.
 
No prison can hold Chairface Chippendale. And on a totally different topic ... my stuff:
2017 Permaculture Design Course and Appropriate Technology Course at Wheaton Labs
http://richsoil.com/pdc
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