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Galicia's clitoris festival - turnip tops for the win!  RSS feed

 
Burra Maluca
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I've always called them turnip tops. The locals call them grelos. Sometimes they are rapini.

Galicia has a whole festival devoted to them.

And google translate obviously recognises quite how special they can be...

Galicia celebrates 'clitoris festival' thanks to Google Translate error



Though I have to admit, the real thing is pretty awesome too. Here's a photo and link to a recipe.



What more can I say?
 
Neil Layton
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They look really juicy.

The turnip tops, I mean.

This is actually perhaps worth knowing about. I intend to win it at some point.
 
Burra Maluca
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This part of Iberia certainly does love its vegetables!

Portugal is famed for it's leafy pottery. Here's a couple of pieces I picked up locally. I'm a little nervous of what people might think of me now if I display those grelos nabs too prominently. Are they considered rude? I'm guessing the pickle dish is supposed to be some kind of bush cabbage.



Apparently most anatomical parts have Portuguese colloquial names of various fruits and vegetables, but I'm having difficulty getting anyone to give me a definitive list. I'll update as I find them out.

Do any other languages do this?
 
Neil Layton
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I'm not aware of it in terms of vegetables, but I am aware of it in terms of the landscape. It's something I've been giving thought to in the context of pattern languages in forest gardening - not only what patterns do we use, but how do we name them in the context of our experience of the landscape?

In Scots Gaelic, the word "fèith" means vein or sinew, but also a channel or stream in a bog. Some terms are more scatalogical. One particular mountain was renamed from Cac Càrn Beag when Queen Victoria bought the estate. This was probably to avoid the following conversation:

Vicki: And whet do you kell thet mountain?
Gillie: Cac Càrn Beag, ma'arm.
Vicki: Ewww. And whet does thet mean?
Gillie: Little heap of sh!te, ma'arm.

They renamed it after the loch (Lochnagar) at its base, but climbers still often use the Gaelic.

Another spot is named as "Devil's Point" on Ordnance Survey maps. This is a translation of Bod an Deamhain, or Pe**s of the Demon. The same ghillie is thought to be responsible for that, too.

Two hills not far from where I am are known as the paps o' Fife, because they are, well, pleasantly rounded.

Sadly, with the dominance of English in Scots culture, a lot of these names are in the process of being lost. Others went because the early surveyors went and talked to the rich landowners, not the people who lived and worked on the land, which then allowed the despoilation of the countryside (I'm reliably informed that, when they were planting the endless tracts of Sitka spruce they described it as "mamba country" - "miles and miles of bugger all").

One of the things I think that might be important to living in a forest garden habitat is regaining this verbal language in the context of our experience of it. Some parts of a forest garden will involve the organic processing of wastes. Others will be fruitful, or hard, or wet, and I like the idea of expressing those through the names we give these places in our gardens. I see no problem with extending this to the plants we grow.
 
Jd Gonzalez
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Burra Maluca wrote:This part of Iberia certainly does love its vegetables!

Portugal is famed for it's leafy pottery. Here's a couple of pieces I picked up locally. I'm a little nervous of what people might think of me now if I display those grelos nabs too prominently. Are they considered rude? I'm guessing the pickle dish is supposed to be some kind of bush cabbage.



Apparently most anatomical parts have Portuguese colloquial names of various fruits and vegetables, but I'm having difficulty getting anyone to give me a definitive list. I'll update as I find them out.

Do any other languages do this?


Yes, in Spain el "nabo" or turnip also means the penis.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Burra Maluca
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I think I've done my share of giving the local market stall holders a laugh.

See that butternut on the far right hand side? That's the only one that we didn't grow - I wanted a locally grown butternut/moshcata for seed and spent ages at the market selecting one that stood upright in the hope of getting a line of moschatas that stored easily. I carefully tested out each one on the stall and chose the best shaped one, then realised that everyone was watching me and, presumably, making their assumptions as to what I was intending to use it for.

 
Ben Johansen
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Burra Maluca wrote:bush cabbage


I'm not gonna say it, but you know what I'm thinking...
 
Burra Maluca
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Ah yes, Portugal's couve Galega, aka bush cabbage.

Of course, they have grelos too, but they grelos de couve, not grelos nabs.

Rather beautiful, don't you think?

 
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