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Do you remember Postum, the coffee substitute. Seeking recipe or other roasted grain substitute.

 
Posts: 9002
Location: Victoria British Columbia-Canada
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Postum was a popular coffee substitute, at one time. It is still popular amongst Seventh-day Adventist and Mormons whose dietary rules forbid the consumption of caffeine.

It's made from roasted grains and molasses.

I was introduced to it in the 1980s, long after its peak popularity during the War years, when coffee was hard to get. My uncle, had trouble sleeping and his doctor thought that 5 coffees a day might have something to do with it. He started drinking Postum. I haven't had any since 1993, when I moved West.

Do any of you make a roasted grain coffee substitute. Coffee is quite abundant here, so that's not my issue. I just think it would be nice to drink something that doesn't keep people awake and leach calcium from their bones.

I don't need caffeine to keep me sharp. I have trouble shutting my brain off, even if I'm laying in a bathtub, drinking warm milk.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postum
 
Posts: 307
Location: Stone Garden Farm Richfield Twp., Ohio
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We dig the roots of chicory, ..best picked between Fall and Spring. Wash the roots, then dry in the Sun. Slice the dried roots into pieces. Roast in a 350 oven. Grind into fine power. Make coffee. ...Has no caffeine. We haven't tried any grains yet.
 
gardener
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I had some at my grandparent's place in the late 60's...

http://www.cooks.com/recipe/p461o1z8/homemade-postum.html  
sort of sounds right from my memory of what it tasted like with a dollop of milk.

http://www.food.com/recipe/postum-copycat-version-2-422228#activity-feed
This one sounds better.

Both will take you a while to make a batch, they call for five hours of roasting in the oven...
 
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"Parsnips, wheat, chickpeas, and barley aren't the only ingredients that can be used to make rich, good-tasting coffee substitutes.

Oats, fax, rye and (of course) chicory can also be made into delicious Java-like beverages . . . or coffee extenders. "

http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/make-your-own-coffee-substitutes

"Parsnip Postum Coffee Substitute Recipe"

"Cut a batch of fresh parsnip roots (skins and all) into very small pieces, or grate the roots as you would hash brown potatoes. Dehydrate the bits well, then roast 'em in a 400 degrees Fahrenheit oven until they're a very dark brown (about 20 minutes). Turn the oven off and allow the crunchy morsels to cool as the oven itself cools.

Then get out your favorite mug, steep the parsnip chunks in scalding-hot water (one rounded tablespoonful per cup), and presto! "

http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/parsnip-postum-coffee-substitute-recipe


I would think that you could do this with any root, like dandelion or turnip.


"Barley Coffee Substitute Recipe"

"First, spread a thin layer of barley (husks and all) onto a cookie sheet . . . then place the sheet inside a 425 degree oven and bake the grain (stirring frequently) until it's uniformly dark brown. Finally, grind the browned barley in an old coffee mill, food mill, or blender.

To make "Java", just perk one heaping teaspoon of barley per cup of water. "

http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food/barley-coffee-substitute-recipe-


While I didn't find a recipe, I believe you can make coffee using roasted brown rice.
 
Dale Hodgins
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Thank you, I somehow forgot this thread in my exuberance for other topics. With all that roasting, it sounds like a good job to be laughed at for cooler weather. I will try it and post results.
 
pollinator
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Location: Greybull WY north central WY zone 4 bordering on 3
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One other hot drink recipe you might want.  I realize it isn't grain.

Pink Drink

1/2 cup of red hots
1/4 cup of whole cloves
1/2 cup of sugar
2 cups of water

simmer at a low boil for 15 minutes mixing steadily. The candy hits a point where it get very sticky and hard keep stirred off the bottom. Don't let it burn to the bottom of the pan and just keep stirring.

Strain and put in a jar and refrigerate.  Kept with care it can store for months.

To use mix roughly 1/4 cup of mix with 1 cup of milk and heat.(mom always made it just a bit weaker) Add the marshmellows(best part of this is the flavor they absorb as they start to melt in.

Brand of red hots matters but it has been so long I don't know the good brands.(plus there was only one choice in Greybull) The brand I laste used for this the flavor was completely normal while drinking but it had just a hint of cinnamon after burn when finished that a really good batch wouldn't have had.
 
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When my family first moved to the Yukon river country in the early 1970s, the local Christians turfed us out of town (arranged for our rental cabin to be suddenly unavailable, about a week before first snowfall) when they realized my folks were heathens and uninterested in getting saved.  We would have bounced a couple of hundred miles but for one old trapper named Mike Molchin who let us stay in a trapping cabin on some mining claims he wasn't using, about ten miles out of town.  He drank nothing but Postum, and had hundreds of old Postum jars kicking around that he used for storing anything that needed to stay clean or dry.  

He died about ten or fifteen years later of a rare form of liver cancer.  Some years after that, it became known to science that the cancer in question was associated with aflatoxins, most likely to be encountered by humans in moldy nuts (especially moldy peanuts).  This old trapper had jars of peanut butter in every trapping cabin along his trap line; if they got a bit moldy around the rim or under the lid, he'd just wipe away the moldy bit with his sleeve and spread the rest on his pilot crackers.  He was seriously hard core.  My father was convinced it was the moldy peanut butter that killed him.  

My memory of the man is one of the unholy stench of blood and artificial maple.  There's a Crescent brand of fake maple flavor called Mapleine™ that was sold back in the day with a recipe for boiling up with sugar to make a passably decent artificial pancake syrup.  (We bought it and used it for that purpose, in the deep sub-arctic nowheres.)  But fur trappers used to swear by it as a great mask of human scent; they would practically bathe in the stuff, and wash their traps in it, and rub it on everything to hide their scent when setting traps.  And after a few bottles leaked in this man's pockets, and under the seat of his snowmobile, the smell mixed with his body odor and the scent of his fur-bearer carcasses and just followed him around like a signature cloud.  It was impressive and deadly!


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Postum, two flavors
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Maybe it's real, maybe it's Mapleine
 
pollinator
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Location: Boudamasa, Chad
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Roasted Cassia occidentalis seeds are easy to grow and make a great coffee substitute. But careful, the seeds tend to get away and go invasive

 
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Location: Monticelli Di Esperia (FR), Italia
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Here in Italy, most bars (cafés in America) have Orzo. A barley based drink as a substitute for coffee.
Many older people seem to drink it as it was a staple during and after World War II as coffee was rationed then.

Another drink found in bars is Ginsing. It is too sweet for my taste. It is made from a powder but I have no idea of the ingredients.
 
Dale Hodgins
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I spent two months in the Philippines and had Milo malt drink almost every day. It is probably the most common drink given to children, and many adults drink it every morning instead of coffee or tea, or along with it. I have seen it mixed with ice cream, used on breakfast cereal and mixed with oatmeal. I had to hide the large container that I bought, because the children of the house where I was renting, were relentless in trying to obtain this product.

It played a key role in getting thousands of bits of plastic and other garbage gathered from the yard of this home and the surrounding roadway and ditches. I sometimes gave them Milo drink and other times it was sprinkled on cut up bananas. Kids will clean up garbage if you give them Milo. My landlady walked into the shared kitchen at least 20 times asking if she could borrow a little Milo. None has been returned as of yet,, so I'm not sure if we have the same understanding of the word borrow. :-)
 
pollinator
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More alternatives:

There's a legume based tree called the Kentucky coffee tree from which native americans brewed a similar drink:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kentucky_coffeetree

Roasted acorns can be used.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GD1xGT05V30

And I'm a little surprised nobody has mentioned dandelion root (since it is a superfood).
https://www.eatweeds.co.uk/dandelion-root-coffee-recipe

For even more, search for "erstaz coffee" (substitutes they used during WWII due to rationing/unavailability)
 
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I believe Whole Foods sells an equivalent product. I think I've also seen it at a World Foods section in Bed,Bath and Beyond. I became an avid drinker of Postum when I lived in a shared house while going to college in the 1970's. Very soothing drink! Have you ever tried Horlick's? The British drink it abundantly.Amazon also sells it.
 
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Okra seeds aka, gumbo seeds. Reported use as coffee substitute by early African Americans. Many plants in the fabaceae family have similar compounds to coffee if you still want the alcaloides like caffeine. Coca for example very similar effect on the body.
 
Posts: 376
Location: West Midlands UK (zone 8b) Rainfall 26"
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I've never tried making my own coffee substitute, but I drink Barleycup or Whole Earth which are cereal/chicory based.  
 
Dale Hodgins
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I think, for me the simplest thing will be to just grow coffee. This coffee growing under the coconuts doesn't get pruned or watered or anything, and they get lots of beans. The family doesn't call it shade-grown organic, but they don't do anything to it and it grows in the shade, so that's what I'm calling it.
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Hester Winterbourne
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Stuart Sparber wrote:Have you ever tried Horlick's? The British drink it abundantly.

No we don't!  We really don't... do we? https://flashbak.com/a-complete-horlicks-the-history-of-the-bedtime-beverage-and-its-advertising-18936/
 
Hester Winterbourne
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Bambu is another cereal based alternative.
 
pollinator
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I have tried all of these and think they are good.


Inka – is a mixture of barley, rye, chicory, and fig.  The barely and rye are warm and draining, while the chicory provides energetic anchoring and the fig adds sweetness.

Pero – is a mixture of roasted barley, malted barley, chicory, and rye.  Pero is very similar to Inka, substituting malted barley for fig as the sweetening flavor.

Roma – is a mixture of roasted barley, roasted barley malt, and roasted chicory.  Roma is unique in this list in that it is freeze dried to give a look and feel like instant coffees. \

Cafix – is a mixture of barley, chicory, malted barely, figs, and extract of red beets.

Teechino- Roasted barley, carob, almonds, dates and vanilla are among just a few of the flavors in this line.  Loaded with flavonoids and antioxidants.
 
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