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ID: Fast growing, Missouri

 
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I cut a bunch of the pasture a couple weeks ago, we have had almost no rain. I went down there today, the grass is still looking cut, but there there is something I can't ID growing fast and happy in the grass. Either I'm really thrilled with it, since it's fast and happy, or it's going to be a problem, since it's fast and happy, and I need to get it out quickly. It's about 14 inches tall, in 8 inch deep grass. No other data. No guess what it might be. Just the picture, and curiosity. Southern Missouri, zone 6 a or b. Sunny exposure, minimal water.
Do I love it or hate it? Help!!
Thanks!! Pearl



 
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?  https://weedid.missouri.edu/weedinfo.cfm?weed_id=420
 
pollinator
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I think it’s a milkweed, but there are many varieties.
 
Ken W Wilson
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Does it have milky sap?
 
Pearl Sutton
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Hm... I'll have to check it closer. I have both bush honeysuckle and milkweed I can compare it to. I won't be able to do it today, I'll get out there tomorrow and look closer.
Both are really good options, as both are on the property. They are both familiar, it's possible I have never cut them with a brush cutter and noticed how they look when they grow back.
Thank you for ideas :) I'll get more data.
 
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You can also get a positive ID through your county extension service, just clip one branch and take it to them, won't be any cost for the ID either.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Bryant RedHawk wrote:You can also get a positive ID through your county extension service, just clip one branch and take it to them, won't be any cost for the ID either.


Hi Bryant! Yeah, I have done that with some things. The guy who knows all the plants around here is in an office 40 miles away, the ones in the office in town are occasionally useful. I will do that if I can't figure it out. And their vote is always "spray the hell out of it!" ummm. no.
It sort of looks familiar, like I should know it. I posted it here thinking someone would know it right off, it's not an exotic, and if it grows so easy, seems like everyone else has dealt with it. I have learned a bunch of the things around here to not let get a toehold because they run amok (honeysuckle!) but I'm still learning.
:)
 
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Looks kinda like milkweed to me, though my varieties up here in NW Missouri have a bit longer leaves, but not as long as a dock.
 
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I can't see from that view whether the leaves are opposite or alternate. Milkweed and honeysuckle both have opposite leaves. I think what you have may be sprouts of American Persimmon. If so, the leaves will be alternate, and the patch of sprouts will most likely be coming from the same base. Persimmon spreads readily by suckers, but they tend to space themselves out a bit.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Heh :) Since there are about 200 baby american persimmons and one big adult tree within 150 feet of it, that's a very good guess too!
Definitely got some of them to compare :)
And lots of milkweed, several types, that I mowed around, so the deer bit it off at about a foot high. Poo. I wanted to see what colors they would bloom. I had walked over to check them when I saw the unknown plant. If you think it's easy to mow around milkweed with a brushcutter, you would be wrong.
I'll go look tomorrow, with better guesses in my head to think on...

 
Pearl Sutton
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Update: Still growing! Has a brother by it now. Still no idea what it is, hasn't bloomed or anything. Still puzzled. :D

 
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I think it looks like american persimmon as someone else mentioned....I can't see it clearly though.  
Are the stems getting woody?
Maybe one was cut and sprouts are coming back from a stump and that could cause it's bushiness?

At our old place, we always let groups of them pop up from seed and then in three years or so when they bloom and fruit we would thin out the males.
 
Pearl Sutton
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It doesn't look like the other persimmons in the area, BUT if it is one, it's at a very different stage of growth than the others. It's happy, whatever it is, and I suspect at this point it would take serious work to remove it. I'll try to get a chunk to the Ag dept, sometimes the ones in that office have a clue, mostly it ends up needing to be asked of the guy in the other office.  Rattlesnake Master threw the local office, now that I know it, there is no mistaking it, and gooseberries at a certain stage of growth threw them too. Not real confident about their ID skills. They are better at what to spray stuff with than caring what it is :P

:D

 
Judith Browning
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I showed it to Steve and he doesn't think it's persimmon either, but a tree of some sort rather than an herb.  

What other trees are in the area? Cherry maybe?
 
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I'll be watching this! We have some, too - and not a CLUE what it is. πŸ€”πŸ˜πŸ€”πŸ˜πŸ€”
 
Pearl Sutton
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I think it's probably a tree. And I can't prove it, but I think I have seen the same thing in ditches as I drive, until they cut the ditch. So something rampant and rowdy. And it IS right on a fenceline, so bird planted is quite likely.  Trees close that I can think of (that I'm sure it's not any of them) Maple, walnut, mulberry, ash, pecan, plum, apricot, (that whole family of stone fruits) sassafras, oak, cedar, locust, magnolia, dogwood. Shrubs and vines in the area that I'm sure it's not: Japanese honeysuckle, lilac, peony, any of the bulb flowers, nothing in the Allium family, nothing in the mint family, nothing in the Solanum family, pokeweed, joe pye weed, Japanese knotweed, buckbrush, none of the thorny vines or berries, wild rose, Autumn Olive, Osage Orange.

I don't THINK it's Hemp Dogbane, I am fairly sure I recognize that one, as I have a bunch of it.
Still could be a milkweed, I have several types that I'm sure of, it's none of them.
I'd love if it's Tick Trefoil, but I doubt it.
Still possibly Amur Honeysuckle, but doesn't look like the others I have ID'd.

If I were still in NM, not looking at the leaves, only the growth habit, I'd say Ailanthus, (it's not, totally wrong leaves) just that rowdy happy easy to spread type energy. What is rowdy and energetic like that around here that I'm missing?

 
Pearl Sutton
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Carla: Rule out this list...

I don't THINK it's Hemp Dogbane, I am fairly sure I recognize that one, as I have a bunch of it.
Still could be a milkweed, I have several types that I'm sure of, it's none of them.
I'd love if it's Tick Trefoil, but I doubt it.
Still possibly Amur Honeysuckle, but doesn't look like the others I have ID'd.


Those are most likely suspects at this point. Or a tree I'm clueless on. Which is quite a few of them.
 
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Until you ruled out Osage Orange, I was going to suggest that possibility. It looks very like how mine look when mowed and regrowing rapidly. The appearance is much shrubbier than an undisturbed Osage Orang sapling.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Dan Boone wrote:Until you ruled out Osage Orange, I was going to suggest that possibility. It looks very like how mine look when mowed and regrowing rapidly. The appearance is much shrubbier than an undisturbed Osage Orang sapling.



Zero thorns. All the ones I have seen have thorns from a very early age. Possibly I haven't seen thornless ones?

That plant, once it came up, hasn't been mowed. The space, before it came up, was just grass and flowers.
 
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