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Fall Garden ... Are You Planning One?  RSS feed

 
master steward
Posts: 2517
Location: USDA Zone 8a
605
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Our spring garden turned out to be two tomato plants.  I planted some squash and watermelon seeds though the seeds keep washing out and never sprouted so I finally quit watering them.

My eight walking onions are doing great but haven't walked into any new plants.

So I am thinking of trying some potatoes and garlic.

Is anyone else planning a fall garden?
 
gardener
Posts: 1870
Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
243
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There are things I feel like I should plant for this fall, but knowing me it will probably end up being a winter garden instead. These days it seems like the summer temperatures stretch all the way till the holidays.

I do have a collection of wild flower seeds that I've been cold stratifying. In the next few days I'm going to plant them in pots to create starters for flowers a few years from now. One of them will probably bloom next summer but the others will be another two or three years. Does that count as a fall garden? That's when I plan to transplant the seedlings into the ground.
 
master pollinator
Posts: 10832
Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
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I'm going to try to have a small salad/herb garden in my aquaponics setup which I've been rebuilding over the past year.  I can't decide if I will try to have anything more than that in the area of food-growing.  I do plan to plant a lot of wildflower seeds at home and a bunch of iris at my dad's house.

 
pollinator
Posts: 532
Location: Western Washington
137
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I'm doing starts right now with a friend of mine for mustard, rutabaga, onions, asian greens, cabbage, and peas. I've done only a little fall and winter gardening in the past, so I'm excited to really try and hit it hard this year.
 
pollinator
Posts: 909
Location: Nevada, Mo 64772
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I planted cucumbers and dill a few days ago. It’s very dry. I’ll have to water them until they’re up. I planted sweetcorn about a week ago. It’s up good.  I’d like to plant more fall crops, but it’s too dry.  If we get rain, I’ll get to work.
 
gardener
Posts: 2571
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Like James, I will plant many of the same types of things in my raised bed.  Most of what I got growing is perennial berries, fruit trees, herbs,  and self seeding and vegetables.  It's a permaculture thing.  I mostly just harvest in the fall.
John S
PDX OR
 
pollinator
Posts: 1170
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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One of the benefits of living in our climate is that we can garden 12 months of the year.  I'm still planting tomatoes for the fall/winter crop.  So yes, I'll continue to plant and harvest throughout the next 4 months.  Once we get to Nov. 1, I'll put in a cover crop anywhere where stuff isn't growing.  By Jan. 15th or so, it'll be ready to come out and compost.
 
pollinator
Posts: 543
Location: Southern Oregon
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Fall is often our hottest time so it's still squash and tomatoes until November. I've planted crops mid-October, early-November in the past, and they never do much. They don't die, but they don't grow much until January. I suspect that they don't like how short the days are. Planting out in January seems to work better.
 
gardener
Posts: 1068
Location: mountains of Tennessee
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Seminole pumpkins & various squash. Swiss chard. Sun Gold cherry tomatos are now sprouting & growing for fall crop. Buckwheat. Cabbage. Peanut, rhubarb, & sweet potato harvesting. Also scattering as many wildflowers for next year as possible. I'm building a sun room of sorts & might succeed in keeping something alive in there during winter.

Krupnik. A honey beverage. Warms from the inside.  

 
pollinator
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Deer destroyed a very productive garden. Gonna make the fence taller and start again late august. Thank goodness for second chances.
 
Posts: 108
Location: The Ocala National Forest. Florida, USA
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I'll be planting snow peas, sweet onions and garlic, some lettus, cabbage and other greens for sure. My walking onions did well last season, the heat has them looking a bit ragged now but they should perk up in the fall. Ive got okra, sweet taters, cherry tomatoes, cow horn peppers, snake beans, Seminole, tan cheese, butter nut squash/pumpkins growing... Probably more im not remembering. It's been a much wetter than normal spring/summer where i am so far and things are slow due to the constant wet conditions we're getting. The up side to that is we haven't had near as many 92*+ temps as usual....
 
gardener
Posts: 5731
Location: Vilonia, Arkansas - Zone 7B/8A stoney, sandy loam soil pH 6.5
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We plant three times a year. (Arkansas)

Early spring is lettuces, broccoli, brussels, carrots, beets, radishes and all the other cool weather lovers (strawberries), we start these in late Feb.
Regular planting time (April to May) is when we plant just about all our vegetables, beans squashes, melons, sweet potatoes, etc.
Our fall garden combines both of the above and we start planting it at the end of august or mid September this is when the winter squash go in.

Our last harvest days are usually in the middle of December now, so we plan for this sort of weather pattern.

This year we also got some abnormal amounts of rain from January thru June, it took everyone by surprise.
I keep monthly and yearly records of winds, ambient temp., rain fall, solar intensity and have done so for the past few decades.
This data base really helps with figuring out what to expect weather wise, it doesn't always fit perfectly but it gives me a way to get closer than those with no records to fall back on.

Redhawk
 
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