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!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Fokin ploskorez hoe by Ecominded

 
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My flat cutter is here! Well-packed and should be very useful once I get a handle on it.
Took more than two months - not Ecominded's fault. Was shipped immediately.
If you're waiting and your tracking info hasn't updated in more than a month, it'll still get to you (probably)!
Tracking history for my shipment is here:
https://i.imgur.com/ftDqZ4Q.jpg
 
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andy murs wrote:My flat cutter is here! Well-packed and should be very useful once I get a handle on it.
Took more than two months - not Ecominded's fault. Was shipped immediately.
If you're waiting and your tracking info hasn't updated in more than a month, it'll still get to you (probably)!
Tracking history for my shipment is here:
https://i.imgur.com/ftDqZ4Q.jpg



Thank you for your feedback, Andy!
Things are getting better now. Almost every day we get reports from our customers who finally recieved their parcels, after 2-3 months since they were shipped.
 
andy murs
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andy murs wrote:My flat cutter is here! Well-packed and should be very useful once I get a handle on it.
Took more than two months - not Ecominded's fault. Was shipped immediately.
If you're waiting and your tracking info hasn't updated in more than a month, it'll still get to you (probably)!
Tracking history for my shipment is here:
https://i.imgur.com/ftDqZ4Q.jpg


I decided to mount my flat cutter on a round wood tool handle from Home Depot ($5-$10), felt it would work better for me than the recommended handle. Very pleased, the whole setup is rock solid, I'm aggressive with it and no part of it is going to bend or break, I like the end-heavy feel of the heavy flat cutter with light handle. My previous favorite was a loop hoe, the ploskorez does everything it does, with the addition of digging and moving soil very well due to the open end.
 
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Jay Angler wrote:Has anyone tried using this against Himalayan Blackberry? The thorns go through every set of gloves I've got, so I need a tool I can whack the stuff down from a distance and its main stems are pretty tough.



I should have looked here first! But then it mentioned blackberries...I have no idea the flavor of our blackberries, but my leg is all torn up from the mower grabbing a cane and attacking me! I need a jousting saw (and goats and a goat proof fence) ;p

We've been digging up the thickets and making headway that way. We might be in denial about it though as the second patch we took down has sproutlings all over now...

I really like idea that this tool is good for the handicapped or not so fit anymore. I don't really consider myself either, but a car accident a few years ago has left my hands and wrists damaged (my joints never recovered from the trauma). My body gives out far sooner than I ever expected nowadays and I'm just getting to 40.

I'm trying to get back to my minimalist roots. This hoe being a workhorse is my jam! Wonder if I can get my partner to make me a handle! We've got more oak trees to take down...never ends!
 
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Could someone who has this go out and try using it with only your left hand?  I have a friend who is shy one arm, and am wondering how effective this would be one-handed.

Doesn't matter if you *are* left-handed - my friend is perforce left-handed, after all.  I wonder if the blade angle will make sense.  The twist in the blade is probably partly for strength but also allows the blade to lie flat on the ground for weeding.
 
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For a handle I would recommend a hardwood. Since it needs to be flat, it should be easy to find a flat strip of oak any of the big box stores. also, round over the edges and apply a clear coat to protect would be necessary.
 
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This hoe looks very similar to one I received as a gift. It's also Russian made but I find it is only good for small weeds on previously worked ground...even after a good sharpening! This is great for close around plants but not so good for the walkways my chickens can't weed for me! Could you tell me what the differences are that make the Fokin hoe work better? It sounds as if it actually does what this one was meant to do and would be an excellent addition to my tool shed! Thank you.
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Yury Smirnov
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H Uilis wrote:This hoe looks very similar to one I received as a gift. It's also Russian made but I find it is only good for small weeds on previously worked ground...even after a good sharpening! This is great for close around plants but not so good for the walkways my chickens can't weed for me! Could you tell me what the differences are that make the Fokin hoe work better? It sounds as if it actually does what this one was meant to do and would be an excellent addition to my tool shed! Thank you.



Good question. There is a big difference between stainless steel tool (like the one on your picture) and original Fokin's flat-cutter. Stainless steel tool is a bad choice actually. Please read this feedback: Tale of the Fokin Hoe
 
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Certainly versatile, as demonstrated in the videos. My problem area is a slope of earth that is backfill along the west Wall of my earth sheltered home. I am trying to start juniper there as eventual ground cover and to manage rain runoff. My first attempt failed as I started too late in our short season and plants probably didn't get enough regular water. Additionally the soil is full of round Rock, mostly silt and clay.

This hoe looks like it will be helpful at working around the rock and then helping to keep the persistent napweed cut away. I can see that it is important to be kind to this tool, to keep it clean and sharp. I have twelve small juniper that I overwintered inside in pots ready for the next attempt. So Talley hoe!
IMG_20200524_123449965.jpg
Moving things upslope
Moving things upslope
 
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The Fokin Hoe blade looks awesome! I love that it's made of structural spring steel and durably designed for long term use. I'm so tired of cheaply made, poorly designed tools.
 
Yury Smirnov
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roberta mccanse wrote:Certainly versatile, as demonstrated in the videos. My problem area is a slope of earth that is backfill along the west Wall of my earth sheltered home. I am trying to start juniper there as eventual ground cover and to manage rain runoff. My first attempt failed as I started too late in our short season and plants probably didn't get enough regular water. Additionally the soil is full of round Rock, mostly silt and clay.

This hoe looks like it will be helpful at working around the rock and then helping to keep the persistent napweed cut away. I can see that it is important to be kind to this tool, to keep it clean and sharp. I have twelve small juniper that I overwintered inside in pots ready for the next attempt. So Talley hoe!



Yes, indeed, you need to keep it clean and sharp.
 
Yury Smirnov
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Ryan Kremer wrote:The Fokin Hoe blade looks awesome! I love that it's made of structural spring steel and durably designed for long term use. I'm so tired of cheaply made, poorly designed tools.



I have been using my flat-cutter for 7 years already and it is still in good condition.
 
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Yury Smirnov wrote:

Trace Oswald wrote:I read somewhere that it is carbon steel.  I would assume it would have to be sharpened sooner or later, but that is based on experience with other carbon steel tools.


That's correct, Trace. The blade should be sharpened as often as you would sharpen a scythe.



Where can I find directions/video on how to sharpen the blade?
 
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S Gibau wrote:

Yury Smirnov wrote:

Trace Oswald wrote:I read somewhere that it is carbon steel.  I would assume it would have to be sharpened sooner or later, but that is based on experience with other carbon steel tools.


That's correct, Trace. The blade should be sharpened as often as you would sharpen a scythe.



Where can I find directions/video on how to sharpen the blade?



Please watch this video to learn how to sharpen Fokin hoe:

 
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Yuri - my partner and I have each asked this in different places but not received an answer yet - can this be used in the left hand? Do you need two hands to operate it? Do you make a left handed version?
 
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Burra Maluca wrote:Yuri - my partner and I have each asked this in different places but not received an answer yet - can this be used in the left hand? Do you need two hands to operate it? Do you make a left handed version?



The same flat-cutter can be used by left-handed and right-handed person. It works well from both sides.
Important thing is that it is designed to work with both hands - to make it work in the most effective way.
Of course you can use only one hand to work with flat-cutter, but it takes time to get used to work with one hand.
 
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Yury Smirnov wrote:
The same flat-cutter can be used by left-handed and right-handed person. It works well from both sides.
Important thing is that it is designed to work with both hands - to make it work in the most effective way.
Of course you can use only one hand to work with flat-cutter, but it takes time to get used to work with one hand.



That's wonderful!  

My friend lost his right arm a few years ago and if you think it's possible for him to use it with just the left hand I think it would be perfect for him as he can wander around with it whacking brambles, cutting the odd bit of grass, making furrows for his beans, weeding and probably using it as a walking stick too. I appreciate it won't be the most effective way to use it, but it might be that it's the most effective all-round tool he can use.
 
S Gibau
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I am really happy to discover & learn more about your hoe. I was beginning to think that I'd have to give up annual gardening. I simply can't bend and stoop to weed my beds anymore. I've unsuccessfully tried gardening tool after gardening tool and either they didn't work like I needed them to or they bent/broke on me. The design of your hoe gives me hope that maybe I can whip my garden back into shape this year afterall. I know you can't tell from the pictures but there are 16 beds and a hugelkulture mound under all of those weeds lol. I've been trying (somewhat successfully) not to feel too bad about all of the weeds since I've been researching everything that popped up. Wouldn't know it to look at it but there's quite a lot of food/medicine growing in there too.
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S Gibau wrote:

I simply can't bend and stoop to weed my beds anymore.

I've been making myself some serious raised beds over the last 18 mnths - like 30" high with lots of punky wood at the bottom to hold moisture like a hugel does. They're time consuming to make out of used packing skids, but my friends think they're awesome! The point is that I want a place I can plant and harvest from that don't hurt my back or knees.

I've unsuccessfully tried gardening tool after gardening tool and either they didn't work like I needed them to or they bent/broke on me.

I've got one of the shorter, sturdier hoes, and you certainly won't break the hoe part. I'm a little worried about the handle I made as I made it out of salvaged material and don't actually know what type of wood it is. I'm wimpy enough that I'm probably safe, but I worry about others who might decide to "help" me! To be safe, I actually replaced the bolts that came with the head with stainless steal so it would be easy to dissemble if I need new wood, but I live in a very damp environment.
 
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I would like to try one of these, too!
 
Yury Smirnov
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By the way, here you can get the best sharpener for Fokin hoe: Sharpener with handle
 
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Could someone clarify the payment options when ordering from ecominded.net? I usually avoid paypal and prefer to enter credit card information directly to avoid adding an intermediate agency, but the website took my order and is asking for payment in a followup email with a choice between paypal and paysend. What are the costs/risks of using these options internationally compared to each other or a direct bank transfer and can I still go back to that option?
 
Yury Smirnov
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My dear friends,
If you had a chance to evaluate all the advantages of ploskorez (flat-cutter, Fokin hoe), then you will surely appreciate this new option - a flat-cutter made of Titanium that you only need to buy once in your lifetime: https://ecominded.net/flat-cutter-titanĀ It is very strong, rust-proof and 1.7 times lighter than a similar flat-cutter made from iron. Titanium blade keeps sharpening for a long time and the soil does not stick to the blade, so there is no need for constant cleaning.
 
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Looks like some stray junk in your URL. Delete the %AOIt at the end and it works fine.

Just received my set of two yesterday and have a few questions. Is there a 'rule of thumb' regarding handle length to height of the user? Planning on setting up the large for me and the small for my wife and we are not the same height.

Also there is mention up thread of using it as a mini scythe as well as a hoe. Is this an either one or the other? Does not seem like you could use it as both as the sharpness required is quite different. Never actually used a scythe but have used both a sickle and a sling blade and they have to be much sharper than hoes or shovels.
 
Yury Smirnov
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William, most of the people with average heights (160 cm to 180 cm) use 135-140 cm handle. If it will be too much for your wife, you can always cut about 5-10 cm.  And if your height is around 2 meters or more you will probably need a handle 150-155 cm

I often use "Large" flat-cutter it as a mini scythe, it works pretty well. And I never use "Smal" for this purposes, just because it is too small. :)
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