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Growing Garlic

 
Posts: 43
Location: Tunisia
trees chicken homestead
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Plant in the fall and you’ll find that your bulbs are bigger and more flavorful when you harvest the next summer. Garlic grows best in rich, well-drained soil with plenty of organic matter  such "chicken manure " and free of weeds.How to grow garlic
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pollinator
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Looks nice. With enough space looks like you can propagate lots of garlic!

My clay soil stays heavy even when I mix in lots organic matter, and also gets lots of competition from other plants that flourish in winter rain. I’ll try it in pots next time as mine didn’t grow at all previously.

I have lots of compost, leaf mould and aged horse manure for a potting soil, and unlimited styrofoam broccoli boxes (35 litres/9 gallons) to grow things in.
 
pollinator
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Location: Virginia USDA 7a/b
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Tim I’ve done great with clay soils with deep wood chips during the fall through spring. I remulch when the tops are killed back lightly. When the bulbs are harvested  in early summer i grow melons in the same bed. Onions too. Made a movie. Sorry thumb typing.

https://permies.com/t/127043/Wood-chip-fall-onions
 
pollinator
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Location: N. California
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This is my first year growing garlic.  I must have misinterpreted something I read, or watched because I thought I was suppose to divide the cloves, which is right, but I thought I was suppose to peel the paperish shell off too, which is wrong.  Do you think they will still grow, or should I buy more and plant again?
 
Tj Jefferson
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Jen, as long as they start actively growing very soon I.e. good planting schedule they should be fine. If you have issues with slugs or borers you might lose a bunch. I’m way too lazy to do anything but divide them but I’ve had some that were actively growing and had broken out of their paper and they did well.
 
Posts: 118
Location: Fryslân, Netherlands
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Garlic planting coincides with the falling of leaves, so this makes it easy to apply a thick layer of mulch if mulch - an alternative to the wood chip method. The garlic will poke through the leaves, don't worry. Garlic competes badly with weeds, and a thick mulch layer should be a big help against those weeds. Try keep a layer on until late spring, then make sure it's gone for the last 4 to 6 weeks until harvest, because the bulb growth needs warmth, so you don't want an insulating layer at that point, you want instead the sun to warm up the soil. I'm a heavy clay gardener as well, alliums in general cope well with clay. Although the pots you're mentioning seem big enough to do a good job as well. Small pots are definitely to be avoided, as they can easily get to dry, to wet, give more swings between hot and cold, and this'll mean the garlic plants get stressed easily. And of course plant food will run out easily. But 35 ltrs sounds ample, and shouldn't give these problems.
Be aware that within the garlic species there are groups of varieties with very different climate needs. Garlic can grow in very diverse climates, but the varieties that do a great job in, say, Alaska, will be different varieties from the ones people grow in Morocco. In that respect the differences between different garlics are far greater than the differences between different potatoes, or beans, or name any crop and the differences won't be as big. While visually garlic bulbs all look more or less similar. This may also be why garlic sometimes fails; not having the right type for the climate you're in, because you thought garlic was garlic.        
 
Chokri Hizem
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Location: Tunisia
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Mulch will help to prevent the garlic roots from being heaved out of the ground by alternate freezing and thawing!
 
Chokri Hizem
Posts: 43
Location: Tunisia
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When garlic leaves begin to grow, it's so important to feed the plants to encourage good bulbs growth!
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Chokri Hizem
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I use composted chicken manure to fertilize my garlic. Composted chicken manure not only helps to build the health of the soil by adding organic matter and increasing water holding capacity but it also acts as a fantastic fertilizer adding vital nutrients.Organic Fertilizer
 
Tim Kivi
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Chokri Hizem wrote:I use composted chicken manure to fertilize my garlic. Composted chicken manure not only helps to build the health of the soil by adding organic matter and increasing water holding capacity but it also acts as a fantastic fertilizer adding vital nutrients.Organic Fertilizer



I attended a talk by an organic fertiliser company and they said that the smaller the animal’s digestive tract, the better quality manure they make for fertiliser. So you’re onto a good idea by using chicken manure.

Does the nitrogen stop bulbs from growing well like it does to fruit and vegetables from flowers?
 
gardener
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Location: South of Capricorn
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I grow garlic to use the greens- snipping them off every so often.
Is there any different approach I need to consider as opposed to growing them for the bulbs?
 
J Grouwstra
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Location: Fryslân, Netherlands
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It'll mean that you can plant almost any time you want. For bulbs you're bound to a particular time path, including a decent spell of exposure to cold. You wouldn't need to worry about that at all if it's just the greens you're going for. Any season you can plant, I suppose.
Personally I'm just familiar with growing for bulbs, but I've understood varieties in the Turban group of garlic grow fastest, so they might be a good choice. The Artichoke group makes quite broad leaves, that might also be something to consider. Or getting Elephant garlic if you can; big foliage there. I know people who'll use some of their Elephant garlic plants purely for the greens.
Maybe it'll also be interesting to plant bulbils for greens. With bulbils I mean of course the aerial bulbils which grow from the infertile flower heads of garlic. Some varieties may produce too small greens, and I don't know every variety, there are hundreds after all, but I've seen my Pskem, a Marbled Purple Stripe, grow relatively large plants from bulbils. The advantage with growing from bulbils would of course be, that if you let one plant develop its scape, you're left with lots of free bulbils.  
 
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ive got either wild garlic or it was planted decades ago

comes back every year and i harvest some, not all, in the spring after seed pods break open

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Tereza Okava
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Location: South of Capricorn
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i only bought some because they were at the local ag supply store- it is late spring here, which is totally not the time I would expect to plant garlic. But I put them in and they're growing, so I guess it's working.
I will try to leave some to get bulbils, that's a great idea. As for kinds, unfortunately here we have only one kind of garlic (typical for all our veggies, I can only get varieties if I bring in seeds from abroad), but I guess at least i know it's suited to the region!

Beautiful, Bruce!!! ^mouth watering^
 
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