gift
Garden Mastery Academy - Module 1: Dare to Dream
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Anne Miller
  • Pearl Sutton
  • r ranson
stewards:
  • paul wheaton
  • Burra Maluca
  • Mike Haasl
master gardeners:
  • John F Dean
  • jordan barton
  • Greg Martin
  • Carla Burke
gardeners:
  • Jay Angler
  • Leigh Tate
  • Steve Thorn

plant ID help

 
Tereza Okava
gardener
Posts: 2166
Location: South of Capricorn
883
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm drawing a blank on what I planted in the one bed next to the kale. Can any of you help?

About 10 or 12 inches tall.
Has a taste almost like an edible chrysanthemum, but the only one of those I might have planted has a growth habit that looks like an ornamental (more frilly leaves), not these broad leaves.
No hair, but when I bit it there were a few strings in the stalk. Tasted good, it was juicy and kind of piney like a chrysanthemum.

The options for what I could have planted, from looking at my seed collection:
prize choy (but doesnt have the white stems like the images of prize choy i'm seeing- I've never tasted prize choy, so not sure.)
tatsoi (no, I've grown that, it is round and darker and close to the ground)
mizuna (no, that is frilly)
calendula (? doubtful but have never actually had any come up so can't tell what the foliage looks like)
I really don't know what else it could be! There is a small row full of it, so I definitely planted it on purpose. Aside from the calendula, zinnias, and the occasional marigold, I don't plant flowers, so it has to be some kind of food plant.
 
greg mosser
gardener
Posts: 729
Location: the mountains of western nc
174
forest garden trees foraging chicken food preservation cooking wood heat homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
looks like culantro to me.
 
Tereza Okava
gardener
Posts: 2166
Location: South of Capricorn
883
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I WISH!!! I have been looking for culantro for years, actually found one one year, we are too cool for it here and it dies pretty quickly. This definitely doesn`t have the culantro taste, oh man I wish it did.
 
T.J. Stewart
pollinator
Posts: 170
Location: Zone 6a
25
homeschooling hugelkultur kids personal care trees books food preservation cooking medical herbs bee homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm sorry, I can't help you out, but there are two other places you can check.  One being your extension.  A lot of times they have a department that you can send photos to for plant identification.  The other is, if you have a cell phone, there's an app for that!  

https://apps.apple.com/us/app/picturethis-plant-identifier/id1252497129
 
Rebecca Norman
gardener
Posts: 2167
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
521
trees food preservation solar greening the desert
  • Likes 4
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
It doesn't look like calendula foliage that I have had. Calendula I have always known has not had that scalloped edge, and is always a bit fuzzy.

Could somebody have given you a pinch of seeds and talked it up, so you excitedly planted it right away, and never put it into long term memory? That's something I would do...

Or... seed companies sometimes mislabel things, so maybe you planted one of the packets listed above but something else got in there.

Well, of course one solution is "Wait and see," and hope that the bolting that lets you identify it doesn't end its edible life!
 
Tereza Okava
gardener
Posts: 2166
Location: South of Capricorn
883
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks TJ, I`m outside the US... but I used to work for Cornell Coop Extension when I was in college, so maybe I need to see if there is some angle I can work there!!

Rebecca, thanks about the calendula. It is another one of these "holy grail" plants I always hope to have (and never have).
My seeds are usually pretty easy to keep tabs on because I bring them all in from abroad when I travel (you may know how that goes) and may have.... a spreadsheet to keep track of them? (ah, the shame of the seed hoarder). I used to keep a journal but that has fallen by the wayside, now I think I shall have to take that up again....

I will probably just let it grow and see what it does, and eventually cook it up as if it were chrysanthemum greens if it doesn`t change drastically. I ate a leaf yesterday and didn`t die, lol. I will definitely let at least one bolt.
 
Amy Arnett
gardener
Posts: 497
Location: Nara, Japan. Zone 8-ish
356
kids dog forest garden personal care trees foraging
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Mizuna that has come back from seed in my garden has come back with varying leaf shape. Some have been more rounded like in your picture. By about the third or fourth season coming back on it's own, the only mizuna left had a vaguely frilled more rounded leaf and lots of spines and the flavor was pretty strong and spicy.

I think mizuna is heavily selected for its frilly leaf shape. After a couple generations in the garden, it could be easily lost.

Please keep us posted if it flowers!
 
Tereza Okava
gardener
Posts: 2166
Location: South of Capricorn
883
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That is great to know, Amy! In this garden anything is possible.
 
Greg Martin
master gardener
Posts: 2615
Location: Maine, zone 5
1231
2
forest garden trees food preservation solar wood heat homestead
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm guessing it's a round leaf garland chrysanthemum that somehow came out of your frilly leaf variety???  Not sure if that occurs commonly or not, but it was just the first thing that sprung to mind when I looked at your picture.
 
Tereza Okava
gardener
Posts: 2166
Location: South of Capricorn
883
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
That or broad leaf definitely looks like a candidate.
And.......Last night I discovered a few seed packets that were in Vietnamese. I don't read Vietnamese, unfortunately, and went by the picture (I buy seeds wherever I find them, this was a few years ago at a Chinese market in urban NJ across the road from my US bank. You never know where you're going to find good things.) Yard long beans and chrysanthemum. Pic did not look like round or broad leaf varieties, but like Rebecca mentioned, things sometimes don't match their packaging!
 
Steve Horst
Posts: 6
Location: Eastern PA
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I saw this picture looking for herb seeds and thought it looked similar.

https://www.rareseeds.com/store/herbs/betony/betony-purple-or-hedge-nettle
 
Tereza Okava
gardener
Posts: 2166
Location: South of Capricorn
883
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
wow, it sure does!!
I can't wait to see the flowers on this thing to know what it actually is!
 
Anne Miller
master steward
Posts: 5437
Location: USDA Zone 8a
1635
dog hunting food preservation cooking bee greening the desert
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I keep looking at your plant and it says lettuce.  I looked around for one i planted one year but couldn't find it.  I think the name was "mustard lettuce" seems like I remember it tasting kind of peppery.  From the site Steve posted:



Plants grow about 36 " tall in good soil. Stems for pickling should be harvested before the plant sets flowers. Plant 15 inches apart for best shaped plants.



Link to Rareseeds for Pickling Plume Lettuce
 
J Davis
pollinator
Posts: 364
Location: East tn
92
hugelkultur foraging homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Looks similar to sow thistle, which is a very pleasant wild edible green.
 
Tereza Okava
gardener
Posts: 2166
Location: South of Capricorn
883
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I`ll report back as soon as we have flowers and we can tell.

(def not sow thistle, although we have a lot of that here-- the favorite food of the rabbits and my mother in law!)
 
Cody Smith
Posts: 23
Location: Florida Zone 10
5
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
There's a plant ID app called PlantNet and it's pretty accurate, should be of help for future reference
 
Tereza Okava
gardener
Posts: 2166
Location: South of Capricorn
883
dog rabbit urban cooking writing homestead ungarbage
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Thanks Cody.
Still no flowers, but we ate it last week, it has to be garland chrysanthemum. If there is ever a flower, we'll know for sure.
gift
 
Garden Mastery Academy - Module 1: Dare to Dream
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic