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Photos of Joseph Lofthouse's Garden  RSS feed

 
gardener
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Laurie: Thanks for the grow and taste report. Yesterday I harvested 4 Big Hill tomatoes, and immediately planted the seeds. They are part of my beautifully promiscuous tomato breeding project and may contain inter-species hybrids. So I was hyped that I was able to get seeds soon enough that I might get one more generation grown this summer.
 
pollinator
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Location: Montana
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My Big Hill are setting fruit!
 
Joseph Lofthouse
gardener
Posts: 3287
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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My carrots are flowering...

So are the poppies. These were grown without weeding.

The wild tomatoes could fit very well into a flower garden.

I've been going to the mountains to collect wildflower seeds.

How much do you enjoy the taste of daylily flowers? I adore them!

I do row-cropping. It greatly simplifies planting, weeding, and harvest.  I like rows to stretch from one side of the field to the other, and to be spaced just wider than my cultivation equipment. For the squash and tomatoes, that's about 8 feet.

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Carrot flowers
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Poppy flowers
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Promiscuously pollinating tomatoes
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From a hill overlooking the squash field
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Daylily flowers are edible
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Loving the huge heads on this ancient wheat
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If you come visit my farm, be sure to bring a jacket, even during the day in the summer!
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Row cropping tomatoes and cucurbits.
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Nanking cherries
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Expect to be wildcrafting seeds from these in a couple weeks
 
steward
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Joseph are you collecting all sorts of wildflowers or just certain ones ? I might be able to collect some from our property in Wyoming if you like?
 
Joseph Lofthouse
gardener
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Miles Flansburg wrote:Joseph are you collecting all sorts of wildflowers or just certain ones ? I might be able to collect some from our property in Wyoming if you like?



I'm collecting wildflower seed from the local ecosystem. Some I may sell to a regional seed company. Some may get listed in my seed catalog this winter. I am attempting domestication of some species: That is moving them to my garden, and selecting for traits that are more suitable for human food production (taste, productivity, etc)

I would be interesting in wildcrafted serviceberry seeds from other areas. And wildcrafted Potawatomie plum seeds.

Here is a photo of the first two seedlings to germinate in my Potawatomie Plum breeding project.
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potawatamie plum seedlings
 
Joseph Lofthouse
gardener
Posts: 3287
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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William Whitson and I made a podcast last week. William is an owner of Cultivariable seed company.
https://www.cultivariable.com/podcast-6-joseph-lofthouse/
 
Posts: 409
Location: Bendigo , Australia
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Facinating stuff
 
pollinator
Posts: 886
Location: Longbranch, WA
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How much do you enjoy the taste of daylily flowers? I adore them! 


Day lilies don't bloom over a long enough time for me. Evening  primrose and holly hocks give me fresh blossoms  every day all summer long.
 
Posts: 55
Location: NRW/Germany
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Just yesterday I had my first daylilly blossom and was totally shocked at how good they taste. I had planted them for purely ornamental reasons and now I want a lot more so I can eat them and still have some to look at. Do they have differing flavours? Mine taste crunchy, slightly sweet and with a hint of chives, that gets stronger in the stalk.
 
gardener
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Location: Olympia, WA - Zone 8a/b
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I would be interesting in wildcrafted serviceberry seeds from other areas. And wildcrafted Potawatomie plum seeds.



What is the best way to process/store serviceberry seeds? I think I'm on the end of the season here but a friend told me of a bush growing wild with very large berries. He collected seeds from it in the past and I was thinking about getting some myself. Could send you some assuming there are still berries left to pick!
 
Joseph Lofthouse
gardener
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Thanks Daron:

Daron Williams wrote:What is the best way to process/store serviceberry seeds?



They are a seed in a wet fruit, so I use a few different methods:

1- Eat the fruit, spitting out the seeds.

2- Mash the fruit with a little bit of water and let the seeds ferment for 3 to 7 days. The seeds sink, the pulp floats, wash the pulp away.

3- Pick seeds out as best as possible.

4- Let the fruits/seeds sit around and dehydrate naturally. 
 
Daron Williams
gardener
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Sounds good - I will try to check the bush out sometime this week. It is growing wild at a city transit park and ride.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
gardener
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Here's a few photos from this week:

The squash really loves this hot weather. It's growing fast right now! I skipped planting part of a row that is near some trees, because stuff doesn't grow well that close to the trees. The squash bees have hatched, and are having a glorious time in the squash flowers.

And while I'm on the topic. My next door neighbor is constantly spraying his yard to kill plants. I believe that his poisons are negatively affecting my field. Notice how the row closest to his place had poor seedling establishment, and the plants closest to him are puny compared to further away. It's the same seed lot, planted on the same day. Farmed the same way.

I only have one type of daylily readily available, so haven't been able to taste if there are differences between flavor of different varieties.

I'm growing red cabbage for a local chef. She'll turn it into lacto-fermented slaw. This is one of the few pure varieties that I am growing. Doesn't have a variety name, since it came from a nursery.

I've been putting on a bee suit to mow the apiary this summer, so it's not the huge weed patch that it's sometimes been in the past.






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Squash field is liking the heat.
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Decreased plant establishment and vigor next to the neighbor's fence.
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Daylily.
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Red cabbage, and beans.
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The apiary.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Four months ago, I posted this photo of cold-stratification of garlic seeds. Just by putting them in a pot outside, and let the weather take care of it for me.



Here's what they looked like yesterday. I gratefully acknowledge the pioneering work of Avram and Ted of Garlicana.

 
Daron Williams
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I got some of the serviceberry berries. Thinking about doing the fermenting method. Would I then let the seeds dry after that is done?

The serviceberry is growing on the northwest side of a parking lot right on the edge of the lot and a small hardwood forest.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Daron Williams wrote:I got some of the serviceberry berries. Thinking about doing the fermenting method. Would I then let the seeds dry after that is done?



Thanks. I think so.
 
Hans Quistorff
pollinator
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Location: Longbranch, WA
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I saved a bag of Oregon [Washingto] holly Would you like some of them?
 
You can thank my dental hygienist for my untimely aliveness. So tiny:
It's like binging on 7 seasons of your favorite netflix permaculture show
http://permaculture-design-course.com/
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