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favorite kinds of mayonnaise and magic mayo method  RSS feed

 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Location: Missoula, MT
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I didn't want to hijack Xisca's awesome thread about Mayo as a healthy food: Homemade of course...quick and green, so I started a new thread. I'm very excited about mayonnaise today.

I would love to try Xisca's green mayo, though we aren't exactly growing avocados in Montana these days, so we eat them as a special treat.

I've been particularly fond of the bacon fat recipe I posted in the good lard is a health food! thread. Though since we're not producing our own bacon yet, we don't always have such an excess/surplus to use this way.

If you try to buy 100% organic mayo, it has soy oil. Or canola oil. Or both. Usually both. Ugh.

So we have this goal of making our own mayonnaise, with sunflower, safflower or olive oils - 100% organic - when bacon fat isn't available.

I've been avoiding this task until today. We were out of mayo, and I wanted homemade tartar sauce* for the salmon loaf. (If you think about it, sometimes cooking follows rabbit trails like this, or worse.)

So I decided to try this method today.



It was so easy, I made three kinds.

sunflower oil
half sunflower, half olive oil
bacon fat

The first two turned out perfectly, beautifully. And yes, it was like magic.

Though I still didn't like the olive oil flavor, even when cut in half. Erica of Northwest Edible Life, who made the video, told me she doesn't use extra virgin, she uses regular olive oil when she makes mayo. I might have to try that. She also recommended grapeseed oil.

The bacon fat mayo with Erica's recipe was a little soft for my taste. I might have to go back to the bacon mayo recipe linked above. Though I think the immersion stick and jar will work fine, since the bacon fat mayo mixes up easily.

What are your favorite tricks or tips for mayo? Ever tried making it with lard?

*homemade tartar sauce: mayo + 1-2 T. minced onion + 1-2 T. relish + lemon juice + salt & pepper to taste - voila!
 
Ken Peavey
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Garlic Mayonnaise
Use the same may recipe as you usually do.
Run the garlic through a garlic press first.
Add as much garlic as you dare.
Be daring.

Horseradish
same as above, but with horse
putting the horseradish through a food processor beforehand to make a puree will make a smoother batch
leave the mustard out of the recipe if you wish, plenty of kick without the mustard
a bit of garlic won't hurt a thing
spread on roast beef or ham sandwiches, you'll never go back to plain, drab, dull, boring old mayonnaise

Herb Mayonnaise
Add fresh or dried herbs of your choice to the mayo at blending time
more sweet, go with tarragon
more pungent, try oregano
be advised, fresh herbs in the mix reduce the shelf life of the mayonnaise to just a few days.
if using fresh, adding the herbs at blending distributes the moisture, helping to prevent the mayo from separating
dry herbs can be added any time

Nut Mayo
don't do this

Southwest Mayo
Add some cajun spices!
Basil, oregano, garlic, cayenne pepper, a dash of tabasco or several dashes.
Try it on a sandwich wrap with fresh tortillas, lettuce, tomato, cheese, chicken, beef, avacado, maybe olives, roasted red pepper, tomatillo

Sesame Mayo
add a teaspoon or two of sesame oil to the blend.
You don't need much



 
Ken Peavey
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Jocelyn Campbell wrote:*homemade tartar sauce: mayo + 1-2 T. minced onion + 1-2 T. relish + lemon juice + salt & pepper to taste - voila!


Add ketchup (you read that right)
End up with homemade 1000 Island Dressing

Take the Garlic Mayo (easy on the garlic this time), blend with buttermilk (3 parts mayo to 1 buttermilk), a splash of Worcestershire, just a touch of paprika, maybe some black pepper, mix well, then blend in bleu cheese (diced or crumbled) = Bleu Cheese Dressing. This wants to chill overnight to bring out the deep cheese flavor. Use the remaining buttermilk to make biscuits.

Add some pureed onion when making the Garlic Mayo, then blend with buttermilk or sour cream (3 mayo to 1 buttermilk), chives, parsley and dill to make Ranch Dressing. Also wants to chill overnight.



 
Ken Peavey
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FOLD
Fold the bleu cheese crumbles into the dressing.
 
Leila Rich
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I make basic mayo using homemade mustard and cider vinegar, whole eggs and cold-pressed sunfllower oil.
It's basically impossible to split mayo if you use a 'stick blender'.
Adobo sauce/Chipotle chlillies rocks in mayo. I've never tried bacon fat mayo, but somehow chipotle and bacon fat sounds tasty
Preserved lemon
Wasabi!
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Posts: 4205
Location: Missoula, MT
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books food preservation forest garden hugelkultur toxin-ectomy
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Ken, I make almost the same 1000 Island dressing - quite frequently! Your other recipes sound fantastic and very doable. I laughed out loud at the nut mayo comment.

Leila, homemade mustard - yum! The adobo/chipotle mayo -with or without bacon fat - has my mouth watering!
 
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