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favorite kinds of mayonnaise and magic mayo method

 
steward
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Location: Carnation, WA (Western Washington State / Cascadia / Pacific NW)
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I didn't want to hijack Xisca's awesome thread about Mayo as a healthy food: Homemade of course...quick and green, so I started a new thread. I'm very excited about mayonnaise today.

I would love to try Xisca's green mayo, though we aren't exactly growing avocados in Montana these days, so we eat them as a special treat.

I've been particularly fond of the bacon fat recipe I posted in the good lard is a health food! thread. Though since we're not producing our own bacon yet, we don't always have such an excess/surplus to use this way.

If you try to buy 100% organic mayo, it has soy oil. Or canola oil. Or both. Usually both. Ugh.

So we have this goal of making our own mayonnaise, with sunflower, safflower or olive oils - 100% organic - when bacon fat isn't available.

I've been avoiding this task until today. We were out of mayo, and I wanted homemade tartar sauce* for the salmon loaf. (If you think about it, sometimes cooking follows rabbit trails like this, or worse.)

So I decided to try this method today.



It was so easy, I made three kinds.

sunflower oil
half sunflower, half olive oil
bacon fat

The first two turned out perfectly, beautifully. And yes, it was like magic.

Though I still didn't like the olive oil flavor, even when cut in half. Erica of Northwest Edible Life, who made the video, told me she doesn't use extra virgin, she uses regular olive oil when she makes mayo. I might have to try that. She also recommended grapeseed oil.

The bacon fat mayo with Erica's recipe was a little soft for my taste. I might have to go back to the bacon mayo recipe linked above. Though I think the immersion stick and jar will work fine, since the bacon fat mayo mixes up easily.

What are your favorite tricks or tips for mayo? Ever tried making it with lard?

*homemade tartar sauce: mayo + 1-2 T. minced onion + 1-2 T. relish + lemon juice + salt & pepper to taste - voila!
 
steward
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Garlic Mayonnaise
Use the same may recipe as you usually do.
Run the garlic through a garlic press first.
Add as much garlic as you dare.
Be daring.

Horseradish
same as above, but with horse
putting the horseradish through a food processor beforehand to make a puree will make a smoother batch
leave the mustard out of the recipe if you wish, plenty of kick without the mustard
a bit of garlic won't hurt a thing
spread on roast beef or ham sandwiches, you'll never go back to plain, drab, dull, boring old mayonnaise

Herb Mayonnaise
Add fresh or dried herbs of your choice to the mayo at blending time
more sweet, go with tarragon
more pungent, try oregano
be advised, fresh herbs in the mix reduce the shelf life of the mayonnaise to just a few days.
if using fresh, adding the herbs at blending distributes the moisture, helping to prevent the mayo from separating
dry herbs can be added any time

Nut Mayo
don't do this

Southwest Mayo
Add some cajun spices!
Basil, oregano, garlic, cayenne pepper, a dash of tabasco or several dashes.
Try it on a sandwich wrap with fresh tortillas, lettuce, tomato, cheese, chicken, beef, avacado, maybe olives, roasted red pepper, tomatillo

Sesame Mayo
add a teaspoon or two of sesame oil to the blend.
You don't need much



 
Ken Peavey
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Jocelyn Campbell wrote:*homemade tartar sauce: mayo + 1-2 T. minced onion + 1-2 T. relish + lemon juice + salt & pepper to taste - voila!



Add ketchup (you read that right)
End up with homemade 1000 Island Dressing

Take the Garlic Mayo (easy on the garlic this time), blend with buttermilk (3 parts mayo to 1 buttermilk), a splash of Worcestershire, just a touch of paprika, maybe some black pepper, mix well, then blend in bleu cheese (diced or crumbled) = Bleu Cheese Dressing. This wants to chill overnight to bring out the deep cheese flavor. Use the remaining buttermilk to make biscuits.

Add some pureed onion when making the Garlic Mayo, then blend with buttermilk or sour cream (3 mayo to 1 buttermilk), chives, parsley and dill to make Ranch Dressing. Also wants to chill overnight.



 
Ken Peavey
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FOLD
Fold the bleu cheese crumbles into the dressing.
 
steward
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I make basic mayo using homemade mustard and cider vinegar, whole eggs and cold-pressed sunfllower oil.
It's basically impossible to split mayo if you use a 'stick blender'.
Adobo sauce/Chipotle chlillies rocks in mayo. I've never tried bacon fat mayo, but somehow chipotle and bacon fat sounds tasty
Preserved lemon
Wasabi!
 
Jocelyn Campbell
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Ken, I make almost the same 1000 Island dressing - quite frequently! Your other recipes sound fantastic and very doable. I laughed out loud at the nut mayo comment.

Leila, homemade mustard - yum! The adobo/chipotle mayo -with or without bacon fat - has my mouth watering!
 
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To cater to some vegan friends I was trying to whip up a mayonnaise without egg some years ago. I remembered a Spanish Aioli recipe that uses milk - because apparently Spanish restaurants are not allowed to use raw eggs - which turned out to work even better with soy milk. This is my favorite dip/spread now that can be varied by substituting garlic with other flavorings ( I tried mustard, chipotle in adobo, different green herbs...) and it takes only three minutes to make:
With an immersion blender blend 1 clove of garlic and 1tsp of salt in 1 cup milk/soy milk. Add 1-2tbsp. lemon juice or white vinegar. With the blender running,  ad a neutral vegetable oil in a thin stream until you reach the desired consistency. I usually stop a little bit short, because it firms up some more in the fridge.
 
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I had a roommate years ago who grandma couldn't eat egg.  He said they made potato mayonnaise, substituting potato for egg.

I tried it once years ago, flying completely by the seat of my pants (pre internet).  I used a boiled potato;  oil, salt and vinegar in a blender.  My initial attempt had the right look and texture, but was too bland.  

My wife thought I was a barbarian to try to improve on mayonnaise, so I stopped.  Fast forward a few decades and my wife now knows she has a pretty bad egg allergy (even a hint of egg and we all suffer for about 3 days, she suffers the most).  

After reading this I'm going to try again.
 
pollinator
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OK, I've tried also, but it never comes up to Best/Hellmans.  The natural avocado mayonnaise has strong mustard flavor.  We didn't like the olvie oil either, but may try the 'regular' olive oil.  However, I'd like the exact flavorings for... Best!  Anybody duplicate it...yet? : )
 
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Thanks for sharing on making mayonnaise. I've been wanting to make my own and I'm ready to do this.
Not sure which I'll like the best but I'll try them and see.

 
pollinator
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I like seeing the mayonnaise thread again.  :)

I was recently turned on to the idea of making mayonnaise for health reasons.  

There's so much mayo wisdom here.  I love this.
 
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I use the recipes for Mayo, Mustard and Ketchup from Nourishing Traditions.  The ketchup is fantastic, so much so that I now abhor commercial ketchup.
 
pollinator
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Background info: Mayonaisse is a French word, but this food item originated in Spain, and is named for the city of Mahon in the Balearic Islands. The original name in Catalan is "salsa maionesa", in Castilian "salsa mahonesa".

I should mention another type of sauce originating in the Catalan-speaking world: salsa romesco, which originated in the area of Tarragona, Catalonia. It is made of tomato, olive oil, almonds, hazelnuts, in varying proportions. When I lived in Barcelona I ate a lot of this condiment. There are many recipes for making it online. Why this has never been introduced to the USA I can not imagine.
 
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I have several recipe variations on mayo that I have tried and like (can supply recipe upon request).

- A creamy curry mayo - good mixed into cold, cooked chicken.  It has mayo, double cream, lemon, curry powder and mango chutney.

- A tangy, Portuguese version: Making a mayo and adding tabasco/chilli sauce, cayenne pepper, tomato puree, lemon juice and orange zest.

- Creamy Lemon Mayo - Adding to mayo, creme fraiche, french mustard, lemon juice

- Banana Mayo!  😮 🙃 - this one is simple and goes well in a coleslaw*.  Just mash ¼ ripe banana and add 2½ oz. mayo.

- Lastly, a cream cheese alternative to mayo: To cream cheese adding egg yolk, melted butter and chopped parsley.

*I have a great recipe - deluxe variation on a coleslaw (red cabbage, carrots, apples, black grapes, sultanas and walnuts) that has a simple but lush dressing featuring greek yogurt and co-starring a little mayo and some apple juice! 😋
 
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I love mayonnaise too much. Put mayo in zinger burger and it make the burger delicious.
 
pollinator
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Ho I had not seen you mentionned my avocado mayo! As Amy, I also made it banana mayo, but with a lot of banana, and you get a creamy dessert!

I have a new wonderful recipe and will share pics and might try a video.... I also have a quick way to make it, and with no power needed other than elbow oil.

MAYO 100% HOME PRODUCED!

Now I have my hens -> egg yolks for the mayo! (I don't use raw whites)

I have my mutton fat... muttonnaise! Like bacon fat but you need to heat it a bit more to liquefy it and that it stays liquid until the end.

I even have my salt...

And if I want to add some lemon juice? No problem I also have! And it is still possible to add some avocado, from the garden too!

So you can really do it like your normal recipe, just with warmer ingredients. Equal temperatures do not matter actually, as long as no ingredient is cold. It is also very good with garlic in it. It is asbolutely possible to add part olive oil to make it softer. Coconut oil is also an option to make mayo. I prefer the tasteless one.

With a lot of egg yolks and a saturated fat, the result looks like a shiny yellow butter!
 
steward
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Ken Peavey wrote:Add ketchup (you read that right)
End up with homemade 1000 Island Dressing


Yum - that's what Utahns call Fry Sauce (Pink Sauce).
 
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