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my "i have tons of crazy ideas" thread  RSS feed

 
kadence blevins
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Location: SE Ohio
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So i always have tons of weird crazy ideas come to me and i thought i might pop in and list them as i think of them. Maybe some people will pop in and see it and say its a great idea... maybe people with some more know how on the particular one will say its not very plausable and why... maybe some people will see things here and one project will catch their fancy and they will start experimenting with it! (:

** solar RMH heating, hook up one of the solar heater boxes with the soda cans etc and pipe the hot air into a RMH style bench. I have a thread with more detail on the idea in the solar area of the forum.

** permies approved breed chicken, dual purpose breed that would be bred specifically for hardyness on a better than organic mostly/all free range diet. I think a great way to start this would be to gather all the permies who have chickens and are raising them organic or better, free range, etc. And buy fertile eggs from their flock (or from what they consider the best of their flock etc). So you could start with a good spectrum of genetics to play with and hopefully between them you could cull down to the best of them to breed from there. With a foot up by starting with eggs from already permie-raised flocks.

** someone from the lab said in a podcast they want to get into meat rabbits permie style. I have had meat rabbits, just had to get out of em for a while to save up, and i would love to work with someone on this. Its much easier working with someone else. I know all about the rabbits i just need someone who is more into the helping figure out how to feed them permie style (without them escaping and feeding wildlife). I have ideas but not enough money to put toward this.

** meat guinea pigs. I had to sell out of mine due to some personal things come up and the animals werent what i wanted to go forward with. I have sourced someone who will sell me actual peru meat bred cuy and the one guy in the US with large pet type guinea pigs i would like to play with a crossbred line.
The problem is... again i dont have a spot to do it and it cost money. The US guy i could get on my own once i had a setup but the peru ones to import will be over a thousand dollars.
I would really love to work with this though!

** goats... i know goats are pretty un-permie because they are hard keepers and as Paul ranted a bit in the last podcast about them. My family raised milk goats and i adore them... the little hoofed terrors they can be... lol. I have an idea for breeding a line of dairy X nigerian/pygmy that would be smaller than standard, but with better milk production than nigerians or pygmies, and be dual purpose and still make good amount of meat on plate bound wethers. And also a line that would hopefully be less fence terrors.
I am used to hand milking and all the work for them and know how to make cheese, butter, yogurt and would like to expand my knowledge in this space as well


I know theres more ideas but this is a start of them for now.
 
Dave Burton
pollinator
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Location: Greater Houston, TX US Hardy:9a Annual Precipitation: 44.78" Wind:13.23mph Temperature:42.5-95F
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All of your ideas are plausible and can be done. To make things work, you will need to figure out how to integrate the connections and needs of the animals into the connections and needs of the system. I liked how Toby Hemenway in gaia's garden talked about the difference between form and function permaculture. The former's goal is to imitate nature and latter's goal is to behave like nature (i.e. making connections). He also made a good point that animals for necessary for regulating ecosystems. One way toby hemenway taught in his book for establishing connections was to list all the needs and functions of the organisms, and your goal is to make all the needs of each organisms become fulfilled.
For example:
-Goats
-needs: water, oxygen, shelter, and food
-functions: milk, hair, soil compaction, entertainment, companionship, feces, and urine
Here the goat s a dynamic piece of your ecosystem. The milk and hair provide food and clothing for the humans. The soil compaction creates microclimates and encourages species diversity. The entertainment and companionship add fun to the lives of the humans. The feces and urine contain valuable phosphorus and nitrogen for plant growth. The digestive tract of animals is good for helping seeds germinate.
I highly advise watching this video by geoff lawton about cell grazing because he demonstrates how animals can be a vital part of ecosystems and proper grazing techniques:
http://www.geofflawton.com/fe/63637-cell-grazing
I also advise watching Geoff Lawton's video about goats because it proves that goats can be tools for healing:
http://www.geofflawton.com/fe/60564-reforesting-with-goats
 
kadence blevins
Posts: 599
Location: SE Ohio
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Thanks for those links. Tryin to watch em bits at a time whenmy cell allows it to load *eyeroll* but definitely cool.

** another thing i have ideas in.. there was talk in one thread about alternative beds/bedding. I have ideas for handmade hammocks, bedding made specifically to work well with hammock sleeping, maybe a hammock thats an all-in-one kind of like hammock cocoon thing so you dont have to worry about blankets falling etc, some padding to use in a hammock or a nice thick hammock for winter,...

** sheep; fiber, milk, meat... i have not had sheep before but i have lots of ideas to work them in a paddock shift etc and they would be hopefully eventually 100% grass and hay fed. And until then at least be like 70% grass and hay fed and 30% better than organic grain/sprouts/etc feed raised myself.
The sheep would supply me with fiber for my handspinning plus my next idea...

** wool mattress... i super love this idea and have many ideas floating around my brain of different mattress designs. Different sewing/making designs and different ideas of wool processing for stuffing.
Plus i am playing with this awesome way of washing the wool where you actually like ferment the wool and pull it out and rinse it and its nearly all clean. It takes the natural sheep sweat and all that cleans the wool while on the sheep and uses it to clean the wool. So instead of one batch of wool needing X gallons of water and X amount of soap and 3 hours of my time... with this method i use 1/4 the water, about 1/8 the soap, and 1/3 the time!
 
John Polk
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Location: Currently in Lake Stevens, WA. Home in Spokane
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** permies approved breed chicken, dual purpose breed that would be bred specifically for hardyness on a better than organic mostly/all free range diet. I think a great way to start this would be to gather all the permies who have chickens and are raising them organic or better, free range, etc. And buy fertile eggs from their flock (or from what they consider the best of their flock etc). So you could start with a good spectrum of genetics to play with and hopefully between them you could cull down to the best of them to breed from there. With a foot up by starting with eggs from already permie-raised flocks.

I think that this is a great idea. Today's hatchery chicks are being mass produced with piss poor industrial type standards. And, I suspect that in the near future the USPS is going to stop accepting any living animals as "mail". When that happens, raising chickens will no longer be sustainable unless you have your own breeding stock, or a nearby neighbor that does.

Actually, it will become more sustainable because if chicks are no longer accepted in the mail, people will need to get their chicks from local sources. If you have extra dozens of chicks to sell, you now have a new income stream. Even the local seed & feed stores that sell chicks each spring are usually buying from the big mail order hatcheries. Most of the people advertising on Craig's List are also buying from them. They order 100, keep a dozen, and offer the rest on CL to offset their costs. If everybody is cut off from the mail order birds, you may be the only game in town. Prices will skyrocket - good for you in two ways: 1) you can charge more for x week old chicks, and 2) since they are so expensive, many of the urban folks will decide not to raise their own chickens, which means that there will be more people buying eggs instead of growing their own.

There will become a day when if people want to buy live birds, they will need to do it from the local farmers. Be ready for that day before it comes. PETA would like to see the USPS to stop mailing chicks, and so would the egg industry. It is just a matter of time.

As Kelly Klober says, "Don't get into chicken breeding unless you like chicken salad." If you want a vigorous flock, you do need to cull for the best.
 
kadence blevins
Posts: 599
Location: SE Ohio
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Yup "breed the best, eat the rest" for all animals.
 
kadence blevins
Posts: 599
Location: SE Ohio
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** pigs.. i think i would start with a smallish sow and a big potbelly or kunekune boar. Maybe both potbellies, as they are fairly easy to find and i wont be feedin a ton of people. This way less investment before i find out if i care to raise them.
If i did end up well with them i have ideas on a nice line crossing pot belly, kunekune, red wattle hog. If i got into that.

** a seriously simple, no fuss system for guppy breeding to use as chicken/etc feed and especially a nice boost through wintertime. I have several ideas already doodled out and all just would have to actually put it together and see if it worked no.fuss.

 
Karen Crane
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Like your ideas. I was very interested in your thoughts about washing the wool.
Years ago I had an idea about washing the wool while ON the
body of the sheep.
Is this what you were talking about?
Iam also interested in your mattress . bedding thoughts.
Back in the long ago day, people did use wool for bedding,
Not sure how it was kept from clumping when washed,
Or maybe it was never washed? (back then they had different
ideas about hygene.
Was thib=nking about using a pattern of smallish sized " pockets to
hold the wool so that it might not clump as much?
I was thinking about making quits made out of rabbit pelts.
Don't have rabbits, or the money to buy the pelts that are ready to use.
 
kadence blevins
Posts: 599
Location: SE Ohio
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Thanks karen. No theres not a way to wash the wool on the sheep without just felting the whole sheep (not good for the sheep or if ya want the wool).
What i said about is called "ferment fleece method" or "suint method" etc. You take a bucket, add nice dirty greasy wool, top off with water, cover with a cloth to keep bugs out, wait about 4-12wks stirring a bit once per day. Once you get a nice suint going you can reuse the water for several fleeces.

How it works is the sheep make oils/sweat that is on the fleece as it grows. The grease, lanolin, helps shed the rain. And sheep arent the smartest and get rather dirty, so nature set things up so that when dirt gets in the fleece, the sweat and dirt and lanolin combine and actually works to keep clean.
There are others who are better at explaining this, i'm sure, but thats my understanding.

So the suint takes advantage of this natural cleaning and makes sure all of the wool is surrounded and in time it cleans the fleece with very little input from me.
Then once its done i just have to haul out the wet wool from the suint, rinse it, and give it a gentle wash to get rid of the smell of the suint.
 
kadence blevins
Posts: 599
Location: SE Ohio
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Rabbit pelts make great blankets and mitten linings and boot/moccasin linings.. but unless ya tan em yourself its not much good unless ya have extra money to throw at people selling done pelts. The other catch is good rabbit pelts are from 6+month old rabbits.. meaning keeping plenty of rabbits long past the average 8-14wk butcher size.


As to the mattress.... yes anyone in the good o days who used raw wool to pack mattresses with could be easily spotted because they would smell of sheep. Good fleeces wont stink of sheep (unless ya have a strong sniffer or dont like the smell at all) but packing several fleeces raw into a mattress and sleepin there each night plus ya took a bath maybe once a month to once in several months.. ya they are gonna smell sheepy and the dirt and stuff in the fleeces is going to shorten the otherwise lifespan of the mattress and maybe the mattress shell material as well. Sheep do have mites and all they can get so i imagine they were sometimes used straight raw and later those people regretted not doing it right the first place.. be it from smell or itch.


As to the methods... yes my ideas are leaning towards pockets or sections in the mattress. The reason i lean to using long tubelike sections to stuff the wool in is bc ya could have a zipper or buttons on the end to close it and when ya need to pull it out to replace or fluff and restuff etc it is easily accessible. Rather than sewing lots of smallish pockets stuffed with wool and sewing those together like a quilt... which then its all sewn in and ya have to toss the whole thing or snip open each pocket and sew back up. Then take into consideration the amount of sewing... especially in the old days before sewing machines or likely not having money to buy one. ((Just side note i freakin **love** me some treadle sewing machines! Not used one before but i just adore them.))
 
kadence blevins
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Location: SE Ohio
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Another thing i want to do...
I dont think i put this yet but i spin yarn and crochet and knit and some weaving.
I would love to be able to make some husp-friendly clothing and i believe i could setup workshops for this sort of thing. I am in several groups that have alot of the big people for this stuff and its a friendly bunch that i could likely find people to do workshops that are much better at this all than i am currently. ((Workshops at The Lab, pauls place. I am very keen on getting out there as a gapper.))

As to that i really believe that those type workshop could bring in more of the permie women... ahem which has been pointed out the lack of women at events etc and the lack of ladies at the lab.
 
Karen Crane
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The stuffed pocket idea I talked about for a mat tress
was not thinking to open up pockets to wash or fluff but
wash as is and if it is done right I hope will not bunch up.
How about weaving the wool ( as well as knitting it?
I saw some really neat woven blankets that were soooo soft !
The wool from the morino sheep ( think that is the breed)
is really soft and knits and iw woven for allkinds of garments.
Like you I have a ton of ideas......
mind is willing........ body refuses!
 
kadence blevins
Posts: 599
Location: SE Ohio
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Ya just sleeping on it will cause it to felt up. Washing it you would need to pull out all the wool, wash it, restuff. Different wools have different tolerances to how easy they felt but they would pretty much all felt when smushed in a matress and washed. And that would be one heck of a job to wash all together!

Woven mattress.... hm... ya thats alot more work. Ya have to get the wool into a workable form to weave it. Either like roving or thick yarn. Roving would be quite an expensive wayto go. And if ya wanted ya could spin it up and weave thick blankets and use several as a mattress.. but like i said thats alot more work. Then ya would have to get the fleeces, wash em, card them, spin it all, ply it all, weave it. Thats probably a couple hundred hours of time i would guess.

The better way to go for blanket effect would just be thick felted layers. Think larger saddle pads like used for horses etc under the saddle. Problem with that would be pretty firm/hard so anyone needing/wanting a soft mattress is gonna quickly turn that down.
 
C. Kelley
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Location: zone 4b/5a Midcoast Maine
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** permies approved breed chicken, dual purpose breed that would be bred specifically for hardyness on a better than organic mostly/all free range diet. I think a great way to start this would be to gather all the permies who have chickens and are raising them organic or better, free range, etc. And buy fertile eggs from their flock (or from what they consider the best of their flock etc). So you could start with a good spectrum of genetics to play with and hopefully between them you could cull down to the best of them to breed from there. With a foot up by starting with eggs from already permie-raised flocks.


So, I've sort of been working on this for a couple of years now. I started with a hatchery flock of a non-standard breed, figuring they might be a bit less messed-around-with. I culled those who didn't cut it in an uninsulated open-eave shed with no supplemental light or heat (with windchills down to -17f more than once), and the next year I added a few birds from local flocks who had come through the winter well, also without any supplemental heat or light. I've done this every year for the last four, culling any bird that doesn't THRIVE in essentially a 3-sided shed over deep litter, any bird that isn't a good mom, any bird that doesn't forage well, etc. I had, this spring, a pretty fantastic flock of hardy, actively foraging, self-replicating mutt chickens that would eat snow for moisture when their water froze in winter. This year's plan was to work on meat characteristics and stabilizing the color (a gorgeous deep pewter grey with copper-and-cream lacing on hackles and saddles, with beards, small combs, and lightly feathered feet).

And then I moved, and left the birds in the care of the new tenants (who wanted some of my second-string breeders to start their own flock) at my old house while I got a coop set up at my new place an hour or so away. I told them to call me over ANYTHING weird with the birds, and I would do my best to walk them through responding to it, if necessary to respond at all. Didn't hear a word for two weeks, got my coop set up, and went up to get my birds.

They were all dead but one. A hawk or fox had taken all of them over more than a week, and the new tenants didn't feel it was worth bugging me over four years of work down the gullet of a fox. I found the piles of soggy feathers where they had taken my prized hen, Rocket, and the pile that had been Blue Penny, the pullet who I had hoped to hatch every single egg from this year. Of the rest, there was no sign except a very traumatized Black Mottled Java who had so thoroughly bonded to the feral ducks that I watched her try to follow them into the pond.

I raced home and put the last 11 eggs I had collected from my flock into the incubator and crossed my fingers. Two days ago, I got 5 chicks (which, for the fact that the eggs had been sitting on the counter for almost 3 weeks, not turned or kept in steady temps at all, is pretty freakin' miraculous.) Time will tell how much of my genetics I've managed to salvage - with my luck lately, I just hatched 4 roosters and a worthless hen - but they did annihilate a full plate of fine-chopped kitchen scraps their first day out of the egg, so I have some hope.

I will need to add some fresh blood, though - 5 birds is not enough genetic diversity to be getting on with, I could hack it for a couple of years but it'd be really chancy after that. Who thinks I should start a thread "Send Me Your Hardiest Eggs" and I could make it a permies project instead of a personal one?
 
kadence blevins
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Location: SE Ohio
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How terrible ): you should definitely try startin a thread for a good start up! Sounds like you have a good know how of what to go for.
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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kadence blevins wrote:So i always have tons of weird crazy ideas come to me and i thought i might pop in and list them as i think of them. Maybe some people will pop in and see it and say its a great idea... maybe people with some more know how on the particular one will say its not very plausable and why... maybe some people will see things here and one project will catch their fancy and they will start experimenting with it! (:

Hi Kadence. I have 'tons of crazy ideas' too. So I like your thread
My ideas are different from yours. Of course, every individual has his/her own 'crazy' ideas! I think it's part of Permaculture to share ideas.

Here some of my ideas:
- writing and illustrating a childrens' book, for children about the age of 10, on permaculture. A story helping them start their own little permaculture garden.
- organising activities in my neighbourhood: first a clean-up-action in the park, and then starting a permaculture food-forest there, growing fruits and vegetables between the trees and shrubs already in the park. I know two others living nearby who want this too, we will try to start it together.
- I'll try to sell my products (art and all kinds or things, mostly hand-crafted from natural materials, upcycling and recycling) at a booth this summer when there's a fair called "Montmartre in Meppel". But I won't price my products, my motto will be 'what is it worth for you?' So 'clients' can bid and then I can sell it for that price, or not ...
 
Anderson gave himself the promotion. So I gave myself this tiny ad:
Video of all the PDC and ATC (~177 hours) - HD instant view
https://permies.com/wiki/65386/paul-wheaton/digital-market/Video-PDC-ATC-hours-HD
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