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hand carving spoons

 
Judith Browning
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Spoons are fun...each one can be unique depending on the type of wood and it's grain and the carver's tools and technique.
I wanted to share some pictures of my husbands style of spoon carving, including some of the tools involved.
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Judith Browning
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Spoons at various stages along the way. Some still have the 'nose' attached...a helpful extension for holding at the shaving horse while working on the spoon. The one he is working on at the shaving horse has had the 'nose' cut off in order to do some shaping on the back of the bowl.

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Judith Browning
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...
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Judith Browning
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Judith Browning
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I didn't notice the bandaid until I was editing the pictures........it's pretty common for him to have one somewhere
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Diabalein Avidyia
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I love seeing a skilled craftsman working with wood, really cool stuff you have going on over there
 
Judith Browning
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thanks, Diabalein.....he's been at this awhie, maybe more than thirty years now.
Here's a couple more photos.....unfinished...more carving to do and some sanding................
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Peter Ellis
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Nice work, as always. I see a little chip carving getting started on one of those handles. Fun stuff
 
wayne fajkus
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Very nice!

We'd have less of a throw away society if people would invest their time in stuff like this. Make a ladle and you have a ladle for a lifetime....
 
Judith Browning
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thanks, Peter...do you chip carve??


Wayne, wouldn't it be great )
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Judith Browning
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Peter Ellis
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Judith, I've done a little chip carving, have a set of knives for the purpose, but as with so many of the things I've tried my hand at, I pick it up now and again, never stay with it long enough to really acquire any skill and - oh! Squirrel!!!

There's always something new and shiny that pops up and I have to give it a try
 
Peter Ellis
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Couple of weeks ago now I started carving spoons. Have eleven finished now, with a 'spoon butter' of beeswax and sesame oil. Another five in process that should be finished by Tuesday evening. Tried a kuksa today but got heavy handed trying to rough out the bowl and blew it up ;(.

Most of these are in sassafras, some cherry, and then there is the Yellow Mystery Wood. All from my suburban yard. The yellow is something that broke during Sandy or the subsequent nor'easter that I am just getting around to dealing with. Rough bark, very wet and so very heavy. I don't think there are any leaves to help with identification. It is really quite a startling color.
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A passel of spoons
 
Judith Browning
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what fun! nice work...You have a great assortment there...and sassafras and cherry some of the best woods you could be using. Did you carve them green or dry? and were you able to ever ID the 'yellow wood' ? Beeswax and seseme sound like a wonderful finish....recently I've been trying walnut oil on my kitchen ware and I think it makes them sticky . I'll probably go back to my usual olive oil. Keeep posting pictures
something he does that makes his spoons stay smooth for ever, is after sanding and /or scraping, he then soaks them in water for a few hours to raise the grain....then sands again...this makes them silky smooth for most woods. and then with repeated washings they don't get fuzzy. Some use a scraper or even a chunk of glass as a scraper , and don't sand at all....
for your chip carving interest I am sliipping in a piicture of a chip carved box S. made after a season of tourists ended..he needed to do something different..a bit obsessive....the ends, back side and top all covered with chip carving and etched lines..
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Brian Hamalainen
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Peter: Was your Yellow Mystery Wood dark brown on the cut surface before you worked it? It sounds like it might be Mulberry. I came across a few rounds a while back. The outsides started as dark brown but instantly turned vibrant yellow as soon as I put a fresh cut in it or sanded it at all.

:EDIT: I found some pictures that include one on my pieces of Mulberry. One, under a piece of steel I was cold-forging, shows the "aged" brown color and the other shows the freshly cut color.
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Peter Ellis
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Brian, that looks exactly like what I have. thank you.
 
Peter Ellis
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Judith - that chest is amazing! Wonderful example.
 
Judith Browning
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I like hearing the sound of carving in this video...a great example of making a spoon with just a few really sharp tools.....don't forget your bandaides!.........
 
Judith Browning
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A friend recently loaned us this video...

Wille Sundqvist "The Spoon, the Bowl and the Knife". There is no youtube video to post but here is a link to information on purchasing his dvd and an excerpt from the web site about the man himself...
Wille Sundqvist is an elder craftsman in the rich and deep woodcraft tradition of the Västerbotten region in the north of Sweden. Wille’s traditional of carving spoons and ladles, his greenwood turned bowls, and the educational work he has done through his books, especially "Swedish Carving Techniques" has made him known and loved by the Swedes and by the broader international audience.
Wille (pronounced Veelay) demonstrates unusual carving grasps with his knife and the special skewing cuts that are from an old Swedish woodturning technology for green wood. He also includes instruction in knife sharpening, how to properly oil hand carved utensils, and how to decorate them with fine detail cuts.
Wille’s generous appearance to share his special craft skills makes him a good teacher. His approach to everyday objects - such as how he reflects on eating quietly with a wooden spoon - reflects a philosophy of life and contemplation that only he can put into words. Wille Sundqvist is 87 years old when this 2013 film is being recorded.




http://www.pinewoodforge.com/VilleSundquistDVD.html
 
Joe Oblenis
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Here are my first attempts from a few weeks ago for spoons. The more recent ones came out a little nicer.
Pinterst
 
Judith Browning
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Joe Oblenis wrote:Here are my first attempts from a few weeks ago for spoons. The more recent ones came out a little nicer.
Pinterst


your spoons look great...feel free to post the pictures right here on this thread if you like....and welcome to permies!
 
Joe Oblenis
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Judith Browning wrote:
Joe Oblenis wrote:Here are my first attempts from a few weeks ago for spoons. The more recent ones came out a little nicer.
Pinterst


your spoons look great...feel free to post the pictures right here on this thread if you like....and welcome to permies!


I tried posting them right into my comment last night but it would not work. Hence the link. I was likely doing it wrong though. I just found about about these forums last night while researching Rocket Mass Heaters and Rocket Stoves.
 
Judith Browning
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Joe Oblenis wrote:
Judith Browning wrote:
Joe Oblenis wrote:Here are my first attempts from a few weeks ago for spoons. The more recent ones came out a little nicer.
Pinterst


your spoons look great...feel free to post the pictures right here on this thread if you like....and welcome to permies!


I tried posting them right into my comment last night but it would not work. Hence the link. I was likely doing it wrong though. I just found about about these forums last night while researching Rocket Mass Heaters and Rocket Stoves.


the easiest way, if they are on your computer, is to click on 'attachments' at the bottom of the 'reply' box and then 'browse'.
 
Joe Oblenis
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Here are a few more spoons...as well as a couple new cutting boards I just oiled up.
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Few more spoons and a couple of Cutting Boards I just made.
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first attempt at making spoons. Only the tools in the photo were used.
 
Judith Browning
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Here is a link to a thread about the book "Country Woodcraft" by Drew Langsner http://www.permies.com/t/40375/books/Country-Woodcraft-Drew-Langsner.
 
Judith Browning
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...and if you need more inspiration ....there is a lot about Wille Sundquist HERE ....check out 'SpoonFest' !
 
Rick Howd
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Awesome spoons Joe! Looks like you have some straight grain to carve. Don't be afraid to let your handles follow the wood, find a piece that might make a good bowl and make the handle fit the piece. It's harder initially but far more rewarding to you and the recipient.
 
Michael Newby
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There's a lot of great inspiration over on this page to keep you oohing and ahhing for a while.
 
kevin stewart
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Hi
Where is your welsh love spoon?
 
Valerie Dawnstar
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And here is Peter Forbes who sees spoon making as a community builder.
Spoons for all
 
Judith Browning
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Valerie Dawnstar wrote:And here is Peter Forbes who sees spoon making as a community builder.
Spoons for all


Valerie, thanks for posting this. I really like what he is proposing. Here's a quote from Peter Forbes web site
Spoon carving is a specific tool of community organizing because it helps very different people to laugh together, to imagine something together, to work together, and to create together. A group can take on almost any project after it has learned to make spoons together.
 
David Wood
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We went to the Lost Trades Fair in Kyneton a little while ago:

http://pragmaticsustainability.blogspot.com.au/2015/05/the-lost-trades-fair.html

Events along these lines can be a great way for skilled artisans to demonstrate what they can do, make sales, network, attract class participants and so on.

We're going to do a spoon carving course with one of the exhibitors.
 
David Wood
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We did a spoon carving workshop. Maree wrote it up:

http://pragmaticsustainability.blogspot.com.au/2015/06/spoon-carving-workshop-part-1.html

I think it would be easier to start with a piece of wood with straighter grain. And the axe I was using for carving initially was a bit blunt and I'm not sure was an ideal carving axe for a beginner. I changed over to a Gransfors Bruks carving axe which was a lot easier to use and I suspect sharper.

We're looking forwards to finishing off the spoons. We have a lot of wood that could be used for spoon blanks.

 
Jackson Vasey
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Here are the last three spoons I've done. Progressing along, getting a bit better every time. I make these from firewood mostly.

Basically I just split it to a good size, cut the bowl with a gouge chisel, then cut the shape out with a coping saw, carve the back of the bowl with a beveled chisel, and round the handle with a spokeshave.

I just got a couple of scrapers, so the bowls are coming out a lot smoother for me compared to just sandpaper.
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Jackson Vasey
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Earlier spoons. I've been finishing with flax oil, seems to work nice. I just tried the method of soaking the spoon for 10 mins in warm water to raise the grain before a final sanding, which worked nice.
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My 1st ever. Fun but bad.
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Judith Browning
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Looks like you are off to a great start Jackson!
The soaking to raise the grain works really good doesn't it? We have years old spoons that have had heavy use that are just as smooth as the day they were finished.
I think carving spoons is a perfect way to learn all about different woods and their individual characteristics.
Post more pictures as you have them...thanks.
 
This parrot is no more. It has ceased to be. Now it's a tiny ad:

The permaculture playing cards make great stocking stuffers:
http://richsoil.com/cards


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