• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
permaculture forums growies critters building homesteading energy monies kitchen purity ungarbage community wilderness fiber arts art permaculture artisans regional education skip experiences global resources cider press projects digital market permies.com pie forums private forums all forums
this forum made possible by our volunteer staff, including ...
master stewards:
  • r ranson
  • Anne Miller
  • paul wheaton
  • Pearl Sutton
stewards:
  • Beau Davidson
  • Nicole Alderman
  • Leigh Tate
master gardeners:
  • Carla Burke
  • John F Dean
  • Nancy Reading
  • Jay Angler
gardeners:
  • Jules Silverlock
  • Jordan Holland
  • Paul Fookes
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the straw badge in round wood woodworking.


(source: Brad Millar)

This BB is similar to the sand-level wooden spoon BB, it just needs to be constructed at a higher quality.

To get certified for this BB, post three pictures:

 - Your chunks of wood that you are starting with
 - Progress about half way through, with the hand tools you have decided to use for this
 - Final product (a lightweight spoon you can eat with)
COMMENTS:
 
gardener
Posts: 1314
Location: Washington State
806
4
forest garden trees rabbit earthworks composting toilet fiber arts sheep wood heat woodworking rocket stoves homestead
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Approved submission
Here is my submission for the Roundwood Woodworking - Straw - Make a Lightweight Spoon You Can Eat With BB.

UPDATE: added a final product picture showing the bowl shape of the spoon.

To document the completion of the BB, I have provided the following:
- my chunk of wood
- progress about halfway through (about finished with the hatchet)
- more progress photos with the hand tools I used
- final product (a lightweight spoon you can eat with)

Not sure if this BB requires hand tools only, but here is my list of hand tools used:
- hatchet
- sledgehammer (to pound on hatchet - early on in the hatchet work)
- two knives from a spoon carving knife set
- a spoon knife from the same spoon carving knife set

This BB is similar to the my sand-level wooden spoon BB, made from the same initial piece of wood (the other half of the round), and constructed to a higher quality (including sanding the finished spoon).  I did use the same tablespoon as the template for both my spoon but the wood dictated different spoons.  I'm going to let it dry out a bit more then oil it before I use it but it does fit nicely in my mouth.  :)
1.jpg
Initial Split
Initial Split
2.jpg
Hatchet work
Hatchet work
3.jpg
Progress - Spoon and "template" tablespoon - Hatchet work finished
Progress - Spoon and
4.jpg
heartwood or a crack? I altered the shape of the spoon to remove this material
heartwood or a crack? I altered the shape of the spoon to remove this material
5.jpg
now it looks like a spoon (showing tools and sand spoon on left)
now it looks like a spoon (showing tools and sand spoon on left)
9.jpg
now it looks even more like a spoon (showing tools and sand-level spoon on left)
now it looks even more like a spoon (showing tools and sand-level spoon on left)
10.jpg
lightweight spoon in my hand with sandpaper and sand-level spoon on table
lightweight spoon in my hand with sandpaper and sand-level spoon on table
11.jpg
showing depth of spoon bowl
showing depth of spoon bowl
Staff note :

Could we get a side view to show how bowl-y it is?

Staff note (gir bot) :

Leigh Tate approved this submission.
Note: Beautiful job.

 
gardener
Posts: 1841
Location: Japan, zone 9a/b, annual rainfall 2550mm, avg temp 1.5-32 C
844
2
kids home care trees cooking bike woodworking ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Approved submission
Finally got around to finishing this one.

After deciding to not use the peach wood spoons I made, I made a third spoon from Japanese maple. The tools picture shows a different spoon, but the tools are the same.

I use a nata (axe/machete) for splitting and rough work, a shave horse for work holding, a kogatana knife for carving, and a gouge for cutting out the bowl.
b1-chunk.jpg
Chunk of Japanese Maple
Chunk of Japanese Maple
b2-halfway.jpg
About half-way through
About half-way through
b3-tools.jpg
Used these tools, but the spoon pictured here is different.
Used these tools, but the spoon pictured here is different.
b4-after.jpg
Finished product
Finished product
Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Barkley approved this submission.

 
L. Johnson
gardener
Posts: 1841
Location: Japan, zone 9a/b, annual rainfall 2550mm, avg temp 1.5-32 C
844
2
kids home care trees cooking bike woodworking ungarbage
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I realized I didn't include sandpaper in the picture, but I sanded 60, 120, 240, and 400. Then wet the spoon to raise the grain and repeated sanding until it was smooth even after soaking in water. Finally I oiled it with perilla seed oil, a culinary/drying oil. I highly recommend perilla seed oil. It's a delicious salad oil and also polymerizes like linseed oil.
 
steward
Posts: 13725
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
3993
5
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Approved submission
I made one of these yesterday from a conifer branch out here at Wheaton Lab.  I used a draw knife, carving knife, spoon knife, rock and sandpaper to make it
Chunk-o-wood.jpg
Chunk o wood
Chunk o wood
Starting-with-the-draw-knife.jpg
Starting with the draw knife
Starting with the draw knife
Whittling.jpg
Whittling
Whittling
Shaping-rock.jpg
Shaping rock
Shaping rock
All-done.jpg
All done
All done
Side-view.jpg
Side view
Side view
Hand-for-scale.jpg
Hand for scale
Hand for scale
Staff note (gir bot) :

Opalyn Rose approved this submission.
Note: I hereby certify this badge bit complete.

 
pollinator
Posts: 203
Location: North Island, New Zealand
239
chicken food preservation fiber arts woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Approved submission
I pruned my fig tree, and read that fig has historically been used for figural carvings, and panels for painting, as it has low shrinkage and is not prone to checking. Seeing as those are both good signs for spon carving, I decided to give it a go. It is great for carving, though harder to finish as the wood is a bit fibrous. Got there in the end, though! The cabinet scraper helped a lot.

EDIT: added image of the spoon in a hand for scale!
mb-bb-roundwood-straw-lightspoon-1.JPG
Splitting the fig wood, making stop-cut
Splitting the fig wood, making stop-cut
mb-bb-roundwood-straw-lightspoon-2.JPG
Shaping the spoon with a sideaxe, then knife
Shaping the spoon with a sideaxe, then knife
mb-bb-roundwood-straw-lightspoon-3.JPG
Sanding the spoon with a cabinet scraper made from an old saw
Sanding the spoon with a cabinet scraper made from an old saw
mb-bb-roundwood-straw-lightspoon-4.JPG
The finished spoon
The finished spoon
IMG_1847.JPG
With hand for scale
With hand for scale
Staff note (gir bot) :

Someone flagged this submission as an edge case BB.
BBV price: 0
Note: It's a bit hard to tell if you can eat with it.  Could you take a pic in your hand or with some other size reference?

Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Haasl approved this submission.

 
gardener
Posts: 427
Location: Pembrokeshire, UK
317
2
dog forest garden gear fungi foraging trees building medical herbs woodworking homestead
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Approved submission
I'm a bit apprehensive about submitting my spoon for this BB - the quality of the other entrants is amazing (and quite daunting!). However, this is a spoon that I have just finished and that I will gladly use to eat from - it's lightweight, as specified, smooth and (I hope) of high enough quality to make the grade!

As with a recent Oddball BB, I used a piece of Prunus (a wild plum such as blackthorn or bullace, I'm not sure exactly what) that I gleaned from a local park. It had been cut to clear the path.

I used a saw to cut a piece to length, split it with a billhook and then used an axe, a hook knife and a sloyd knife to shape the spoon. I finished it with sandpaper (150, 240, 600) and coated it with Tung oil to protect and seal it.

Edit: I've added a shot with some dessert spoons for scale. It's quite large but I can fit the hole thing in my mouth. I would be happy (and will be happy) eating with it.

I can't show myself actually eating with it until the tung oil has fully polymerized. I hope that the evidence that I've provided is sufficient
PXL_20210911_152219802.jpg
Wood I began with
Wood I began with
PXL_20210916_153503531.jpg
Halfway through
Halfway through
PXL_20210921_165113602.jpg
Finished
Finished
PXL_20210921_165124628.jpg
[Thumbnail for PXL_20210921_165124628.jpg]
PXL_20210921_165131635.jpg
[Thumbnail for PXL_20210921_165131635.jpg]
PXL_20210921_165151476.jpg
[Thumbnail for PXL_20210921_165151476.jpg]
PXL_20210921_165057846.jpg
[Thumbnail for PXL_20210921_165057846.jpg]
PXL_20210921_165139234.MP.jpg
[Thumbnail for PXL_20210921_165139234.MP.jpg]
PXL_20210921_165106890.jpg
[Thumbnail for PXL_20210921_165106890.jpg]
PXL_20210908_180209522.jpg
Tools
Tools
PXL_20210921_182943658.jpg
Shown with dessert spoons
Shown with dessert spoons
Staff note (gir bot) :

Someone flagged this submission as an edge case BB.
BBV price: 0
Note: Could you clarify if it would reasonably fit in your mouth?  IE if you can "eat with it".

Staff note (gir bot) :

Someone approved this submission.

 
gardener
Posts: 1495
Location: Hudson Valley, New York
808
2
trees bike woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Edge case submission

To get certified for this BB, post three pictures:

- Your chunks of wood that you are starting with
- Progress about half way through, with the hand tools you have decided to use for this
- Final product (a lightweight spoon you can eat with)



I used the other half of the piece of wood I used for the sand badge.
I modelled it on a regular household spoon I use for soup, cereals etc.
I used a saw initially to cut the log to size, then an axe to remove the bulk of the wood before moving on to a whittling knife. I used a spoon knife to make the bowl. I finished with 240 sand paper. I'll get some finer paper before treating with tung oil.

Here are my pictures.
IMG_2681.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2681.jpeg]
IMG_2786.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2786.jpeg]
IMG_2790.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2790.jpeg]
IMG_2795.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2795.jpeg]
IMG_2796.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2796.jpeg]
IMG_2798.jpg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2798.jpg]
IMG_2693.jpeg
[Thumbnail for IMG_2693.jpeg]
Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Haasl flagged this submission as an edge case BB.
BBV price: 0

Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Haasl flagged this submission as an edge case BB.
BBV price: 0
Note: Needs to be smoother and perhaps the spoon end a bit thinner.  It appears to be too blunt to scoop up the last of the soup or other "fine motor skill" activities

 
Edward Norton
gardener
Posts: 1495
Location: Hudson Valley, New York
808
2
trees bike woodworking
  • Likes 2
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Approved submission
Rather than ‘fix’ my last attempt, I decided to start again.

1) Start with a piece of cherry wood



2) Cut to size



3) Gather tools - axe for splitting the wood



4) Get to work.





5) Finishing the spoon end first



6) Shaping the handle



7) Sanded with 240 then 320 grit

8) Finished







Staff note (gir bot) :

Mike Haasl approved this submission.
Note: Nice!

 
Posts: 271
100
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Can anyone help me with a splitting problem? I'm working on my 3rd spoon that has split down the middle as I carve it. Is my wood too green? Am I using strokes that push the grains open? I'm getting better at carving, but my spoons still don't hold water :-/ Help please!
20220713_154010-1-.jpg
the spoons are splitting
the spoons are splitting
 
Mike Haasl
steward
Posts: 13725
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
3993
5
hunting trees books food preservation solar woodworking
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
My guess is that you're taking too long to do the carving?  If you go from fresh stick to spoon in more than 12 hours? I think it tends to split/crack since it's drying out.
 
L. Johnson
gardener
Posts: 1841
Location: Japan, zone 9a/b, annual rainfall 2550mm, avg temp 1.5-32 C
844
2
kids home care trees cooking bike woodworking ungarbage
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I doubt it is your carving technique unless you are putting a blade into the end grain and wedging it somehow.

Mike pointed out one likely problem. If you can start with as small a piece of wood as possible and carve it safely but swiftly to the rough spoon shape, it will be unlikely to crack.

Also if you were storing the green wood in a humid place and then carving in a dry place the difference in humidity might be enough to dry it too fast.

Another factor might be the particular wood you're using could be prone to cracking. What kind of wood is it?

For what it's worth I recommend carving spoons from green maple (though I've heard people say it is prone to splitting).





 
Posts: 34
Location: Portland OR, 8b
36
2
urban bike woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Submission flagged incomplete
Carved a compact stubby-handled eating spoon from a dogwood log from my neighbor.

Used hatchet, saw, wooden wedge, sloyd knife and hook knife.
PXL_20230122_215037926.jpg
Splitting log
Splitting log
PXL_20230126_005707407.jpg
Roughing out
Roughing out
PXL_20230126_024149784.jpg
Partially carved
Partially carved
PXL_20230126_033854835.jpg
Finished profile view
Finished profile view
PXL_20230126_033911204.jpg
Finished end of scoop view
Finished end of scoop view
Staff note (gir bot) :

Someone flagged this submission as not complete.
BBV price: 1
Note: Keep going - smoother, ligher weight.  This would definitely pass for the Straw BB as-is

 
Timothy Karl
Posts: 34
Location: Portland OR, 8b
36
2
urban bike woodworking
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
    Number of slices to send:
    Optional 'thank-you' note:
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
-

I'll make another one in a daintier form and re-submit soon.
gift
 
Justin Rhodes 45 minute video tour of wheaton labs basecamp
will be released to subscribers in: soon!
reply
    Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic