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My Unexpected Frog Pond

 
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Autumn update. Mid-November has brought us frosty nights and mild, sunny days. The frogs come out in afternoon to sun themselves. The water lily leaves are turning as the plants prepare to go dormant for the winter.



The pond water is crystal clear.



Lots of leaves and sludge on the bottom. I'll have to take a look into how to deal with it; how much to remove and how often to keep the pond from filling up.

After a slow start, the duckweed has flourished, although it doesn't multiply as rapidly as some sources say it does.



There are multiple uses for duckweed, and I understand it makes excellent mulch and compost. Here's another use for it.









It's a great treat for our Muscovy ducks. I fear if they every discover the frog pond, they'll wipe it out! Fortunately, the frog pond is on one side of the goat barn and the poultry yard is on the other. So for now, my duckweed is safe.
 
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In my climate, when it gets too cold, the pondweed sinks under the water. Then in the spring it will come back up. I don't know the mechanism and whether it's only temperature or if day length is also a factor, so please keep an eye on it and tell me what it does? I think temp is the key and I'm not sure how cold you get in your location.
 
Leigh Tate
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Jay, I didn't know that about duckweed! I know my hornwort sinks when it goes dormant, and last winter I seemed to "lose" duckweed, so maybe that was why. It also seemed to disappear after heavy rains. I'll observe it as our weather shifts it really-cold mode and report back here.
 
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