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Living (root) wood bridges  RSS feed

 
Posts: 40
Location: NE Oklahoma
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michael Egan wrote:What about grapevines? They are native here in the Midwest, very prolific, very strong, expert climbers and grow fast.



Now that would be a very useful idea in my county if a grapevine bridge could carry light traffic and repair its self.
 
pollinator
Posts: 383
Location: Redwood Country, Zone 9, 60" rain/yr,
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dog duck hugelkultur
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I know of a 6ft wide x 4ft thick branch-bridge about 75ft up between two redwood trunks (probably reiterations of the same tree genetically). Coast Redwoods do this bridging more than any other NW conifer I know of, but I have seen maples fused to doug firs 8 ft up, and doug firs to sika spruces 40ft up.
 
steward
Posts: 3556
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
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Here is an example of living bridges in India. Any other examples in different climates?

 
pollinator
Posts: 1703
Location: Western Washington
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Yes, especially in forests where there are still many interlaced strands of ceder. They form almost platforms. I have seen this work well in draws with alder.
 
Posts: 362
Location: Portlandia, Oregon
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http://www.smithandwallwork.com/archives/portfolio/living-willow-bridge

The link is to a company (no affiliation) that does it, but the pictures are interesting to see. Since white willow will fuse just like cedar I wonder if you could make it over a wider distance by planting support beams/trees.
 
Adrien Lapointe
steward
Posts: 3556
Location: Kingston, Canada (USDA zone 5a)
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really cool!
 
steward
Posts: 2949
Location: Moved from south central WI to Portland, OR
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Gravity is a harsh mistress. But this tiny ad is pretty easy to deal with:
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https://permies.com/t/95939/Sufficiency-MO-acres-Eden-renter
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