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Have any of you stopped using soap/shampoo?

 
                          
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I went chemical free about 4 weeks back. No shampoo, no shower get. Just plain water. My skin seems to have dramatically changed for good
 
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I am so happy to have found this thread.  I have had to keep secret from almost everyone (even girlfriends!) for nearly 15 years that I do not shampoo or shower very often, usually about once a month.  Now that I have long hair, I give it more attention than I would otherwise.  Almost daily I spray it with filtered water (chlorine is awful for my hair) and occasionally use conditioner.

My big epiphany about this came when I was playing tennis regularly in Florida.  It was hot, humid, and I was soaked from head to toe in sweat.  I was in the mindset that "when you sweat, you need to take a shower afterwards".  But on the drive home, I would leave the window open, letting the air evaporate the sweat and cool my body down.  So by the time I got home I was dry, clean, and surprisingly had no odor.  Why would I need to shower?  Ever since then, I've regarded the soap industry as such a tragedy, basically making money by convincing people they're filthy and therefore unattractive.
 
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Hyper Crypton wrote:....My skin seems to have dramatically changed for good....



I've had this same experience. There's something to be said that our bodies know what they are doing. The oils are good for us. We overproduce oils because the soaps in the mainstream market strip them away, causing our bodies to go OH GOD WHAT THE F*CK WHERE DID THE GOOD OILS I CREATED FOR YOU GO??? I WILL MAKE MORE NOW!!

I went thru a process where I didn't wash my hair (except with water and a good scalp scrub using my nails) for about 6 weeks because I was DETERMINED to break the oil cycle my hair had been stuck in after years of regular shampooing. After all, that is what mainstream society teaches us. And, as I suspected, the overproduction of oil eventually stopped after I stopped assaulting my hair with chemicals that stripped it... I've never had more healthy hair. Same with my skin. I had a similar experience to you. I shower (nearly) every day, but it's usually a quick 3-5 minute shower of just water. Once a week I might use soap on the important bits because I do sweat so that needs to be addressed, but for the most part I've found that after a couple years of doing this, my body compensated and managed its oils itself. My hair and skin has never been more healthy.
 
gardener
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I tried it and at first I probably didn’t scrub my scalp enough (my hair was also longer) so dandruff was the only problem I had so I went back to ivory soap. Weeks later I got a buzzer and keep my hair at 5/8ths inch once a month then did ivory only every other night a couple weeks before dropping it altogether.  Now I only use a really natural shampoo after a haircut to get the clippings out. Never had problems with oil. Just keeping my hair short and well scrubbed keeps the dandruff down.
 
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First step is to cut your own hair shorter, so you have less to deal with and save on washing gear ;). Next, a couple spoons of baking soda in a quart container filled with hot water to wash your hair, then a couple splashes apple cider vinegar in a quart of water to condition. There are fancy ways to condition hair, with egg whites and such, and for the fancy among you who would like something like that I'd recommend Maurice Messegue's books, which are fantastic.
 
Joe Banks
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Location: Franklinton, NC
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Forgot to mention, as to soap. Dr. Jarvis in his book "Vermont Folk Medicine" also questioned the need for soap, and recommended apple cider vinegar (that and honey are his only two medicines, just about) as a rinse for the skin which would maintain favorable ph. He worried about the ph effect of soap on skin, and did question the need for it. As for me, I use very little. I had a supply of lye soap from a local market here in town which lasted me five years. This last year I ran out, and that market was closed, so I researched making lye soap. Dead easy to make. You need three ingredients: oil, distilled or rainwater, and lye (one can get lye at the hardware store, or make it fairly simply from hardwood ashes and water). Follow the proportions of these ingredients and the cooking instructions online, but I recommend heat-curing your soap, as thenyou won't have to stir your mixture for a day, and you won't have to cure your soap for several weeks.
 
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I wash my hair with clay. Sometimes I rinse it with plain water, but if I'm more organized, I will rinse with something acidic (cold water with food-grade citric acid, or leftover coffee/tea from the day before). It took about a month for my hair to stop overproducing oil, and now I wash it a couple times a week, hoping to get to less and to be able to just quickly scrub it with sand when swimming this summer. I have average-to-fine straight hair to my waist. It used to look oily 24 hours after washing it with regular shampoo. Here's a link to the method I use - I think my hair would've adjusted quicker if I paid more attention to the consistency (was diluting too much) and how long to leave it on my hair before rinsing!
https://mommypotamus.com/how-to-wash-your-hair-with-clay/
(Her site has tons of recipes for natural hygiene & beauty stuff!)

I have only been doing this about six weeks (although I have gone no 'poo in the past a couple times), and my hair isn't at peak health yet, but it has a lot more body. Using conventional shampoo and conditioner, my hair is really slippery and flat. I like that it appears fuller now, and when pulled back / put up, it isn't slicked to my head.

I use soap to wash my hands. Otherwise, I brush my skin. In the shower, I get my hair wet, put on the clay slurry, turn off the water, brush my skin clean, turn the water back on to rinse my skin and hair. Again, when it's warm out, I'll scrub my skin with wet sand instead. If my skin feels dry, I'll moisturize with oil. If my face feels dry, I first use witch hazel as a toner, then moisturize with oil if necessary. I don't need much - my skin is really healthy and happy!

For deodorant I use this:
https://corvusbotanicals.com/collections/bathbody/products/earth-deodorant-cream
otherwise I will be stinky, probably because I still like to indulge in the occasional junk food. I think if my diet was totally clean, I wouldn't be stinky.
 
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Location: Rural North Texas
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Cindy Skillman wrote:I tried going without shampoo for over a year—I used variously: hot water, massage, vinegar. I honestly just ended up with dirty, stringy hair. It doesn’t work for me... I’ve no doubt it works just fine for anyone who says it does... just not for me. I’ve never been much of a soap user, though, except for hands of course. When I do use soap on my body, I invariably notice a sudden need for deodorant (which I otherwise seldom need.) Weird. I guess it must interfere with my microbial balance. Maybe I ought to have tried kefir on my hair.



Start off by putting 25% conditioner into your shampoo bottle.  I went no-poo ages ago and I've helped several friends transition.  It's almost like your scalp becomes addicted to sulfates in regular shampoo.  Some people take longer than others to transition but most have success starting at about 1/4  or 3 parts shamppo + 1 part conditioner and gradually increasing the amount.  For me, I can't just use water or my scalp is so dry it's itchy and my curls turn into a frizzbomb.

My frequency of bathing depends on my activity level.  Being female, I do NOT sweat.  I glisten and if I glisten a bit too much, then the soap comes out.  I mostly make my own.  
 
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I went water-only a few years ago. I still use soap when I shower, and see no reason to discontinue that practice. I make my own soap, so no weird chemicals.

One of the reasons I went water only (I prefer that to "pooless") is that my hair had essentially stopped growing. Maybe an inch a year, if that, lots of split ends and essentially unhealthy. I chopped it off last spring and it's grown about six inches this year. I just cut it again. It's much healthier.

I was washing my hair almost every day, and slowly eased back. I was down to washing it about once a week when I decided to stop the shampoo entirely. Saves some money, my hair is healthier, my scalp is healthier, and honestly not as oily as it was before I stopped using shampoo.
 
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Location: Southern California (zone 10a)
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Wow! Seriously it was so awesome to read the many posts on here. In my circle of friends, I’m the oddball who only showers and washes my hair ONLY once a week. I use various types of the  Acure brand shampoo & conditioner, which is a 0 out of 10 on the EWG’s (Environmental Working Group’s) App: Think Dirty. I highly recommend downloading the free app which lets you scan items at the store to find out their ratings.

I really wanted to write a research paper on why showering isn’t good for people’s skin and hair because I get so much flack for my once a week. Now , if I get really dirty working with manure or sweating a ton or something, of course I make exceptions to my rule but my skin and hair aren’t usually happy with that.

I too went through a kinda training time for my hair... started at washing every 3 days, then 5, now up to 7.

I’ve tried the no poo method but with the hard city water, it felt like my hair was breaking off.

When I was in Southern Mexico, I found a shampoo bar which worked well and will help me get closer to my zero (or minimal) waste goals. One of the online reviewers said the bar lasted a friend of hers for over 1 year!

Seriously, upon reading these posts, the cliche saying rang true for me, ‘I found my tribe.’
A6A8632B-AA2B-4FB6-9695-AD0B8DECA1BF.jpeg
Think Dirty App
Think Dirty App
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Shampoo bar
Shampoo bar
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