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Creative fence idea, will it work? - Yes

 
pollinator
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Mike, I'm doing high tensile (or at least that's on the menu) and there are a few cheats you might use. One is to shield points of contact of the galvanized wire with a cut piece of old hose. Basically you just put a bunch of 6" sections on the wire and push them where you need it. For the rest, you can get away with nylon in hoses- keep the sun off nylon and it will last for a really long time, and is an insulator as opposed to poly. the hose need not provide structure, just shade.

I'm interested in this because it would allow a place to plant seeds of the eventual impenetrable hedge, which is cheap. Maintaining a hedge... I tried a little one and I am not sure I can make it dog proof.
 
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Thanks TJ!  I'm looking for a way to connect the electric fence wire to the remesh.  It's not electrified, it's just cheap wire to hold the structure together.  I currently wrap the electric wire around the remesh wherever they intersect.  But the wrap likely damages the galvanized coating on the wire and it will rust there in a few years.

I think if I wrapped it around a horizontal piece of the remesh instead of a vertical, it would be a much more gradual bend and it should hold up longer.  But it won't hold as securely so the fence may not be as rigid.

If there was a way to cheaply clip the wire to the remesh, we'd be all set.  Some kind of crimping doohickey.  Or maybe wrapping a third piece of wire around the remesh and the electric wire so that the electric wire doesn't have to bend at all...

I think your idea is a way to keep the electric wire from touching the remesh (if I'm following).  So a solution to a different problem, I think?
 
Tj Jefferson
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Mike you can also get crimping ends for high tensile which have worked well, they are sold in bulk. I will find a link, they doe benefit from a special crimper
 
Tj Jefferson
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https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/american-farmworks-high-tensile-wire-2-3-gritted-crimping-sleeve-pack-of-100?cm_vc=-10005
 
Mike Haasl
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Oh, those would be perfect...  If one side was open so you could slap it in place and crimp it on.  We wouldn't be able to install those on the remesh since it's a welded mesh already.
 
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Thanks for the feedback on this design, I'm driving up to the homestead to plant the small batch of trees that survived the heat and my poor treatment, plus a bunch more seeds and will be picking up the 5' mesh and will try this setup. I was thinking about just T posts with fishing line that some have had good luck with, but I doubt my luck will hold up and it would be a mess.

The main space I'm thinking about isn't exactly round or rectilinear, so I thought I'd get some T posts and drive them around the general area of the fence, then roll the fence out after attaching it to the first post, and curve it to the outside of the posts as it zigs back and forth into the wave shape. Then I can go back and attach the wires to make the extra depth to the fence. Since the T posts would be providing stability I wonder if using something more visible like twine or heavy nylon string would work, it would be visible to the deer and easy to manipulate around the fencing.
 
Mike Haasl
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If you have a t post at every peak or every valley, I'd think that would give you enough support that the wires connecting the peaks (or valleys) wouldn't be as critical and could be replaced with twine.  If you have a couple unposted peak/valleys in a row, I think you'll want wire to hold it together.

One main advantage to this system is that you don't need many posts at all.

I unrolled the 150' roll by dragging it along with my garden tractor and unspooling about 40' at a time.  I prelocated small wooden stakes at each peak and valley that I could hook the waves around until I got it all together.  Those little stakes held the whole works in place until I got the wire strung through to brace the system.

Unrelated to the recent discussion:  I think I figured out how to use the wire without wrapping it around the remesh verticals and damaging the galvanized coating.  Next time I do this, I'll either wrap the wire around a horizontal remesh piece (spiral wind it) or weave it in through one 6" square, out through the next, in through the next and out through the following one.  That weaving may/should give enough friction to hold the wave of the fence in place.  A third option would be to pull the wire tight alongside the peaks and then take another piece of wire and wrap it around the remesh and the electric wire to bond them together.
 
pollinator
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As for the wire breaking when deer hit it can you install springs in the wires so the have give.

As for insulating the wire from the fence short pieces of black poly pipe slit down one side so you can snap them over the electric wire should work as insulators and then point the slit up and wire the pipes to your mesh fence.
 
Mike Haasl
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Springs might work for deer impacts.  I think you'd need one for each wave of the fence since the wire needs to be tied/attached/crimped to the fence at every wave of the fencing.  So it would be a lot of springs.
 
Mike Haasl
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Fence is still standing strong and no evidence of deer entry.  Here's a pic from winter when it's easier to see against the backdrop of snow.
Snowy-fence.jpg
Snowy fence
Snowy fence
 
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Any update?
 
Mike Haasl
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No change.  Still standing, still no deer prints on the inside, still a fun stop on the tour for guests
 
Matt Armstrong
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What type of plants do you grow ?

Do you see deer prints on the outside of the fence?

What would you recommend doing differently for someone wanting to do this?
 
Mike Haasl
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This deer fence is around my food forest.  Since it's worked so well for the past three summers (knock on wood) we took down the fence that is between the garden and the food forest.  So this fence now protects all our garden veggies, 15 kinds of shrubs and 5 kinds of trees along with 1/4 acre of pasture/wildflowers.  The deer eat the hazelnuts on the outside of the fence but not inside.  There used to be a deer trail right through this area that the fence blocked.  So now they have to go around.

If I was doing it again, I'd take the electric wire and spiral wrap it horizontally around the horizontal runs of mesh at the intersections.  I wrapped it vertically around vertical mesh wires which caused the galvanized wire to bend very tightly.  I expect it will rust through much faster at those points due to the severe bending I put it through.  

If I had a bigger area to do, I'd experiment with not having corner posts and just traveling a broad curve and see if the fence can hold itself up without corner posts.
 
Mark Brunnr
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I can confirm that a circular space can be fenced this way without corner posts. I enclosed 1/4 acre and it was still standing after a year.
 
Matt Armstrong
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Great to hear you got it going on Mark Brunnr ! Do you have any pictures to share?

@Mike Haasal I was also wondering what kind of shrubs do you grow inside and outside the fence to hide it?
 
Mark Brunnr
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Nothing to see really, the trees I planted inside still died due to drought so it just some weedy dead grass.
 
Mike Haasl
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All my shrubs are under 2' so they don't hide it very well.  It disappears into the landscape since it's a rusty brown color.

Thanks awesome Mark that you built one!  Any hints or tips that you learned in the process?
 
Mark Brunnr
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My biggest lesson learned was not to over-muscle the post driver due to rocky soil. Caught on top of a t-post and levered down on my head and got a concussion, headaches lasted about 6 weeks!

I used the 5 foot tall rolls of reinforcing mesh for concrete and those ends are really sharp, heavy leather gloves are needed at all times. I found rolling the mesh out first then standing it up was tougher than setting posts and then rolling the mesh back and forth around them.

Definitely recommend wire between posts, I used a string which survived the year but sagged.
 
Mike Haasl
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I'd love to see a photo Mark!  Did you put t posts at every wiggle of the fence?  On mine the only posts are at the corners and the ends of the run.  So about 5 posts for my field.
 
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Mark,

Ouch, my sympathies on the concussion! I had one catch and conked myself on the head similarly driving a t-post a few weeks ago, but nothing like that.
 
Mike Haasl
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I always wondered why they painted the tops of t-posts white or yellow.  I might be wrong but I think it's partially so that you don't lift the pounder too high.
 
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