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Seedling peach tree success/proof that it's worth it to grow from seed.

 
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So glad I find this site.  I was a "garden web" reader before they went out.

What happens if I graft my June Gold peach(late bloomer), on my Red Skin peach (early bloomer), and vice versa?

Will the branches that sprout leaves earlier mess up the rest of the tree's vigor or roots?

- TheRainHarvester on YouTube
 
pollinator
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Chris rain wrote:So glad I find this site.  I was a "garden web" reader before they went out.

What happens if I graft my June Gold peach(late bloomer), on my Red Skin peach (early bloomer), and vice versa?

Will the branches that sprout leaves earlier mess up the rest of the tree's vigor or roots?

- TheRainHarvester on YouTube



It should be fine either way, from what I understand the scion determines bud break and dormancy, the rootstock determines size of the tree, so the rootstock will wake up when the scion receives its chill requirement.
 
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My peach seeds I planted outdoors in the ground last summer are sprouting!

Here's a video I made of them! Click HERE and hit the Subscribe button to see future videos about them!

I'm excited to see how these peach trees will do! I have a one year old seedling peach tree that amazed me with its growth the first year, hopefully these will too!

 
pollinator
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That is a lovely video Steve. Are any of those peach seedlings the one you found in the city? Best of luck!
 
Steve Thorn
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Thanks Aimee!

Yes, the ones closest to the top of the circle bed are from the wild one.

The ones closer to the bottom are from my peach trees.
 
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Due to a heavy workload, in addition to an unexpected surgery & hospital stay, the peach pits from last summer that sprouted months ago are still in the ziplock bags in the bottom of the refrigerator. It's almost like they're haunting me, because I get a guilty feeling every time I open the refrigerator and don't get them out... Ugh.
TBH, I'm not yet sure what to do with them all (there's probably over 100). At first I was going to double dig a trench and drop them in, then dig the survivors up in the fall, but I doubt I'll be double digging anything for a couple of months, until my body heals a bit more.

Do y'all think it would work to crowd them in some of the big tubs that cow feed & minerals come in? Then, when they go dormant in the fall, I could remove & separate the whips and treat them as bare root trees?
I've done something similar with cuttings & rose seedlings, but I'd suspect trees are a bit more vigorous. At the moment, though, that seems to be the best I can come up with, as I already have several of the mineral buckets full of good soil, so wouldn't be too much for me to handle right now. Thanks in advance for any advice or feedback!
 
Steve Thorn
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Don't worry Kc, you're not the only one who had a guilty feeling looking at a bag of unplanted peach seeds. I had to throw away one bag because I left the flesh on, and it got so messy and moldy in the bag. I didn't have an excuse either, just lazy.

I'm going to try to plant them outside right away from now on if I can, since they seemed to do really well overwintering outside. That way I won't be able to procrastinate.

I bet what you described should work great.

Hope you get some good seedlings soon!

 
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Ain't she pretty?
All i'm going to get, way too early to bloom, frost got most of the fruit.
Third year in a row, early blooms and frosts.
Wackey weather.
PEACHFLOWER2020.jpg
[Thumbnail for PEACHFLOWER2020.jpg]
 
Kc Simmons
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Steve Thorn wrote:Don't worry Kc, you're not the only one who had a guilty feeling looking at a bag of unplanted peach seeds.

I bet what you described should work great.



Thank you, Steve! I was able to get one of the two bags planted out last weekend. I didn't count the sprouts, but I suspect there were 60-80 that had began growing (some were a little damaged & may not survive). Then, there were about 20% that had not sprouted, and about 8-10% that were rotten. Since it was way more than I expected, I filled up the mineral tub with sprouts, whick was less than half of the sprouts, so I stuck the rest in gallon nursery pots & random other containers, which I'll likely heel in the ground for summer when I'm able to dig again. The ones that were rotted or hadn't sprouted were dumped under the mulch in the forest garden. Hopefully the odds will be in my favor & I'll at least get enough survivors to plant some out, and maybe sell some in the local market.

Now it's just a matter of figuring out what to do with the second bag of peach pits, as well as the other random fruit trees seeds in the refrigerator.
 
Steve Thorn
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I can't wait to hopefully taste these peaches down the road!

They've grown really fast too!

gift
 
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