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What America needs is more brothals!  RSS feed

 
Casie Becker
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No that's not a misspelling, it's a quote from this article about beef broth.

There's a restaurant near me that makes the most delicious pho, which is a beef broth based Vietnamese soup. When ever I eat it I feel measurably better, even when I stop in the middle of a bike ride. I've made a lot of vegetable and chicken broths, but I was looking for beef broth recipes. This article seemed interesting enough to share. 

Oops, forgot to post the link http://www.foodrenegade.com/america-needs-more-brothals/
 
Anne Miller
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I make lots of bone broth.  Usually from chicken.  After Thanksgiving I would put the Turkey carcass in big stew pot after removing most of the remaining meat. I cook it a long time then add spaghetti noodles.  It then becomes turkey noodle soup.   The key to a good broth is the seasonings.

Bone broth has become a big rage in places like New York City.

How to make Health-Boosting Bone Broth
 
Casie Becker
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We do the same thing with turkey, though we usually take that broth with the scraps of meat and make it the base of a turkey rice casserole. For chicken we do chicken and dumplings. We don't have much family tradition of beef, though.

I'm glad I looked for recipes because it never would have occurred to me to add an acid to help leach more minerals out of the bones. I also probably wouldn't have given it sufficient time to cook. I was thinking a lunch time soup, but now it will be dinner, at the earliest. Worth the time, though. It'll produce enough broth to cover several meals.
 
John Weiland
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@Casie B:       Re: Pho

Yeah, just had a great bowl of this yesterday at a local establishment.  For the vegans, we just discovered the "Not Meat" broth boullion cubes that have a pretty decent flavor for making one's own dishes, including pho.  So when we want something different than straight vegetable stock, these cubes are a good potential substitute:  https://www.amazon.com/Edward-Sons-Not-Beef-Bouillon-3-1-Ounce/dp/B00113SKZW?th=1
 
Bill Erickson
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My Bride started a bone broth last Tuesday, she finally deemed it "ready" on Friday - I love that stuff.

Another type I like is called "bulalo" that I have done in the Philippines. Gives you a good boost for your day and keeps you rolling.

From: http://norecipes.com/bulalo-recipe

...Native to the Southern Luzon region of the Philippines, Bulalo is a light colored soup that's made rich by cooking beef shanks and beef marrow bones for hours, until much of the collagen and fat has melted into the clear broth. The seasonings vary from chef to chef with some using only salt and black pepper while other variations call for patis, bay leaves or even garlic. But at its core, Bulalo a simple cattleman's stew, best made in a large cauldron with whatever veggies are growing near by.

Read more at: http://norecipes.com/bulalo-recipe
All images and text on this website are protected by copyright. Please do not post or republish this recipe or images without permission. If you want to share this recipe just share the link rather than the whole recipe...



Steps
Boil a large pot of water. Add the marrow bones and beef shank and return to a boil. ...
Return the cleaned meat and bones to the pot then add the onion, garlic, peppercorns and patis. ...
Reduce the heat to medium low. ...
Add the corn and chayote and simmer for another 20 minutes or until the chayote is tender.
 
William Bronson
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Numnum! I can almost taste that marrow!
I boil chicken quarters in a flavored stock, then put them strait onto the grill.
The fat and gelatine from the skin ends up in the stock.
Last time we collected the bones,boiled them in a pressure cooker and added that to the stock.
I made a "pizza" dough and included the fat I collected from the top of the stock,and that became the dumplings.
Very efficient,very tasty!
 
Anne Miller
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I got an email that had a link to this article:

http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/broth-is-beautiful/

It also mentions "A “Brothal” in Every Town"
 
Casie Becker
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I better understand why making beef stock from scratch has fallen so far out of favor. It took a full six hours before there was any noticeable flavor change in the water. After that it steadily continued to get richer. More than twenty four hours later and I've finally put three jars of stock in the freezer and added the fresh vegetables to the remainder for a huge pot of beef stew.

I think the stock tastes delicious, and I expect the stew to taste even better, once the vegetables add their flavor profiles.

I like to find long boiling projects to raise the humidity of the house during the winter. It makes the air feel warmer and keeps our skin and hair much healthier. Even before adding the nutrition of the stock, it's a good reason to attempt it. Plus, who doesn't love a house that smells like roasting meat.
 
Anne Miller
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Casie Becker wrote:I like to find long boiling projects to raise the humidity of the house during the winter. It makes the air feel warmer and keeps our skin and hair much healthier. Even before adding the nutrition of the stock, it's a good reason to attempt it. Plus, who doesn't love a house that smells like roasting meat.


My mom always used a pan of boiling water to add humidity during the winter.  I like your idea better!

I have tried making the stock in the pressure cooker but mine did not gel like it is suppose to.  I cooked it for several hours.  A pressure cooker is more time consuming than a stockpot because you have to keep watching it to make sure it is jiggling and doesn't run out of water.

I have also used my crockpot, some people call them slow cookers, mine is a newer version and can't be called a slow cooker unless you put it on "Keep Warm".

Enjoy your Pho, I looked up recipes and it sounds really yummy. 


 
Hans Quistorff
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Restaurant originally came from restaurant, a broth made for restoring health. Eventually it came to be associated with eating places that put out a sine advertising that they served the restaurant.   So perhaps brothels came about by the same process but also provided other services to travelers.
 
Joy Oasis
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I make ours in slow cooker, and it is good to make some without many spices, because those I can hide in my son's smoothie since he doesn't eat soups. I might hide it in his rice too. I also buy pastured gelatin and make gelatin desserts with juice or yogurt.
 
Lee Gee
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Heads up people. Check out the ingredients in the vegan soup bases. (All soup bases really.)  So disappointing. It reads - all natural ingredients. What is your definition of natural? Orrington Farms skips the list entirely but I found it on a website other than theirs.  Edward and Sons lists theirs. Maltodextrin, corn syrup solids, CANOLA oil, CARAMEL COLORING - A CARCINOGEN!!!

So, start with aromatic veggies, roasting them first bumps up the flavor. (Roasting your bones before you put them in the stock, if you are a meat eater, bumps the flavor too.) Roasted veggies/bones also give a nice color to the soup.  Onions, celery, carrots, garlic, celeriac (careful - can be overwhelming) etc. Saute your aromatics. OR - put an onion whole, with the skin still on in your stock. Make sure to rinse all the dirt off. Pull it out before serving  - did I need to say that? Onion skin adds a nice golden color to your broth. Think chicken or veggie broth.  Dig into your spice cabinet! Gotta use most spices and dried herbs within a year at the outside, longer for dried, well kept, root powders (think turmeric, great anti inflammatory/anti tumor and gives a nice color). Don't store your spices/herbs above the stove - heat and moisture. When you are sauteing your veggies add a little extra oil/ towards the end of cooking and then add your heartier spices/herbs. Fat carries flavor and will open up the flavor of the spices and can make their medicinal properties more bioavailable. If using them medicinally add them at the end of cooking as heat degrades their properties. Also think of your food as medicine. I love to add Reishi that I have grown. It becomes hard. Grate it on a grater, put it in a tea ball, throw in your soup pot to simmer. Mushrooms have great medicinal value and add a hearty/earthy flavor and great chew. Saute before adding, gives them better texture in the soup since they are mostly water.

If you want to make cream soups but are staying away from dairy - because of allergies or because some studies have shown that the protein in dairy facilitates tumor/cancer growth, try this - take some cashews, soak them in water overnight before you plan on making your soup. It begins the sprouting process increasing their nutritional value. Then put them in the blender with a little stock, keep it kinda thick, then pour into your soup. Try cream of broccoli, cauliflower, mushroom, or to thicken and add a creamy base to all your soups. Enjoy!
 
Lee Gee
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Someone mentioned it, but adding an acid to your simmering bone broth coaxes the minerals out of the bone into the broth. Think vinegar, apple cider, white, rice to a lesser degree, less pulling power. Brighten/accent your soup with a squeeze of lemon before serving. Also, add things like pesto, salsas, and others, either during the cooking process or as a dollop on top, or clinging to the side of the bowl where you can dip your spoon into the pesto let's say before you go in for that next spoonful. Oh the party in your mouth.
 
Casie Becker
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If there was one thing that I didn't like about my last stock is that it didn't have enough gelatin. Cue attempt 2 with pig trotters and cow feet which just went into the oven for the initial browning.

I think I've gotten a little smarter too, I remembered we have a large crock pot. Too big for most meals except during the holidays, it will serve ideally for simmering stock. I feel a little silly that I didn't use it last time.

I did stumble across one site, while I was confirming trotters were okay for broth that suggested that you can get multiple batches of gelatin rich broth from the same feet. Has anyone experienced this themselves? Experimenting here won't cost more than some water and energy, so I'm probably gonna test this theory myself.

edit: Okay, I got really excited when I found the cows feet. I've filled the crock pot and the stock pot. One pig foot with cow hoofs in the crock. One cow hoof with pig feet in the stock pot. This weeks veggie trimmings, three small onions, and generous handfuls of thyme and savory from the garden split between the two pots.
 
Joy Oasis
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I think it should be very good. I also save vegetable trimmings/peels/onion and garlic skins, and Last time I also used egg shells for some extra calcium. I didn't use salt last batch, because I want to sneak it into the smoothies for my son.
 
Mick Fisch
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One of the things I remember fondly from my childhood/teen years is cominghome and having the whole house smelling wonderful from a big pot of soup, chili or white bean soup on the back of the stove.  Snacking between meals wasn't exactly forbidden but my mom kept most snacks under lock and key (yes, I and my siblings would sneek them, given a chance).  The result was that unless you wanted a carrot, raw potato, or stick of celery, your snack options were limited, except when the pot was on the back of the stove.  For some reason, grabbing a bowl was not only ok, but encouraged and we took full advantage of it.

One of the funny things about this was that when I left home I didn't know a pot of beans left out could go bad.  Growing up I never saw a big pot last all the way to bed time.

I would still rather have a bowl of white bean soup than almost anything, including steak or ice cream.

My moms (and now my wifes) recipe is:
             a pot of small white navy beans
             about 1/2 a pound of bacon, chopped up fairly fine
             an average onion, chopped up\
             4 stalks of celery chopped up
             about 1/2 a small can of tomato sauce or a healthy scoop of tomato paste (too much tomato messes it up, a whole can of sauce is way too much)
             4 of the cheap chicken bullion cubes (if you have cooked down stock even better)
             Lots of pepper. salt to taste

either soak the beans overnight and change the water or bring them to a boil, let them set for an hour, then change the water. 
Boil the beans until they are soft.  Don't add salt until they soften up because it makes the beans stay harder.

When the beans are nearing done, put bacon in the skillet, with a fair amount of pepper and fry it up (fried pepper tastes different and way better than uncooked pepper).  Then add all the other ingredients into a skillet and sautee them.  After the onions and celery are done, put everything from the skillet into a blender, with whatever juice from the beans you need to have enough moisture.  blend it up good, dump it into the beans, mix up, let cook for a little while so the flavors work through, and salt to taste.

 
Shane McKenna
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I make Pho from scratch. I have found it is best to make the broth the day before. I boil the bones for at least 10 hours, adding more sauteed onions and garlic and some more of the seasonings near the end of the process. Then it sits in the fridge overnight. The next day the seasonings and flavors have had time to mature. Until I started leaving the broth overnight, I could not compete with the flavor of my favorite Pho restaurant. Now they only kick my butt by a slim margin...
 
Angelika Maier
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I buy chicken carcasses rather than chicken or chicken necks and feet.
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Yumm ... I think I am going to buy some bones!
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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From the title of the topic I thought it was about soup-kitchens; not only making the bone-broth, but also inviting people to share it with Which seems like a good idea to me
 
David Gould
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We pushed the boat out and imported from the USA a 42 & 1/2 pint  "All American Pressure Canner " so we could do pressure canning preserving  ........... it virtually doubled the USA cost of it .
The added bonus is that it can be also used as a e fantastic stock making  pressure cooker .


It can take 15 pounds of raw bones cut into 2 " length from  all manner of beef , pork  sheep or fowl  frames that have been left after the main meat has been sliced off for other methods of preserving .

It takes six cut up into quarters four pound stripped chicken frames with ease plus onions & carrots to make stock ( whole raw chicken with breasts . & complete drumsticks  ( legs ) removed .

Once up to pressure cooker with all the additions such as herbs ,salt & sugar we pressure cooked it all for an hour & a quarter to get them to teh almost dissolving state so there was no meat or marrow left in /on them . Once th contents were cool enough to work with I took out all the bones & meat straining the liquid through a fine nylon sieve .


We found the " All Recipes " Beef Po soup recipe exceedingly good  in previous smaller batches ,  but when you make the stock in the " AAPC"  in bigger volumes it becomes even better .
The only thing is that if you end up pressure canning the stock  it to keep it for a later date it loses most of it's delicious flavours within a few weeks . Deep freezing the stock for about the same period also causes a big loss of flavours .

One thing we will be trying in the next batch is to pour hot fresh made stock into sterile heavy duty vac & heat seal bags . , Then using a simple set of wooden blocks raise the sealer up high enough so we can seal the bags with out sucking too much stock into the sealers protective tank.  We are thinking that so long as the stock is sterile and still hot , the bags have been rinsed inside with just off the boiling water things may stay sterile  long enough to bag it and store in our refridgerator which is set to 3 oC  for several weks .


Has anyone else found a way to save & store things with spices in them such as stocks & curries so they don't lose flavours & quality ?


One thing  I ended up making five years ago to store non spicy fluid type  foods was getting hold of a length of new unused 4 inch internal dia waste pipe to make " casting forms"  and cut them  off square at 9 inches tall .   Then rolling the short tube up to a batten of square wood I scribed a line along the outer length .   Using a fine toothed hard point back saw I cut down this long line  ( you have to take care doing it and also use a few slivers of wood to keep the saw cut open . ( made six of them in the end ) .

  Once all the cuts have been made use a box cutter knife to scrape the cut edges dead smooth and use a fine grit wet & dry cloth to make them super smooth  ( so they don't puncture plastic bags especially ensuring  where the long cut is you round the edges of the cut so it cannot puncture the bag when you take the frozen bag out the casting form .

  The long cut is to allow the tube form to expand as the ice forms in the food ....not having one can make it nigh on impossible to get the frozen bag of food out the casting forms ..Guess how I know ??
Now put them through the dish washer or wash them by hand  ,  get your vac bags in the heavy duty embossed style ........  the 300 x 350 long ones suit this sized tube

Put the bag over a clean dry hand and push your hand down into the tube , fold the excess gently over the rim all the way round  don't nip it or make a really sharp crease . Use a flatter jar filling funnel to fill the bags to within about an inch of the funnels lower rim with whatever liquid food you want to freeze .

Then when all are filled ,  peel the folded over bag back up the tube and fold it just once without a sharp crease across the normal fold of the bag ... ( This is important as it helps with the sealing of the bag later on )  . Take care when moving the filled bags in the tubes as they do slide out the tube if your not careful ,  I put ours on a tray then take them to the upright freezer or out to the garage's big chest freezer . Store several up right in the freezer for about seven hours till they are frozen solid .

Bring them out , stand for a few minutes so the top folded end of the bag thaws , give them a wipe inside & bout with clean sterile  super absorbent micro fibre  cloth etc . to remove any condensation that has formed on the clod plastic then vac & heat seal them .
Once heat sealed hold the bag up tho the light to prove you have fully sealed right across the bag ..occasionally I've had to reheat seal a bag a few seconds later ... Never store poorly sealed bags ,  the risk of food poisoning increases dramatically if you do .

It may all  sound long winded but in truth it's a very quick easy way of getting liquids, soups & stews etc  frozen into handy pint sized blocks that can be slipped into almost anywhere in the freezers .
 
Kirk Schonfeldt
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I got into making my own bone broth 12 or 15 years ago after reading Nourishing Traditions. My suggestions are to use a variety of bones (marrow bones are great, necks, hooves or chicken feet for gelatin content), include some meat, add some cider vinegar, always roast red meat/bones in the oven before making stock as it really improves flavor (I make chicken stock both ways but its also more delicious roasted first) and simmer a long time. I usually do 48 hrs for poultry stocks and 3-7 days for beef. I also do the slow cooker method and reap multiple "harvests" of stock from the same bones (just keep in mind each successive batch is weaker and less gelling). I let the 2nd and 3rd batches cook longer to help compensate. I label my containers before freezing as "EV" (Extra Virgin) or 2nd, 3rd "press". Every soup, stew, sauce or grain I cook uses broth. I commonly include 50/50 broth/water ratio when cooking rice, quinoa, beans, soup, etc (more if it not EV). I never add salt to broth, and I haven't added veg to my broth for years (I do still add a bunch of parsley a few minutes before I take it off the heat if I remember). I don't de-fat my broth anymore either (I don't drink skim milk, why would I use skimmed broth?). A hot steaming mug of broth with some salt is a wonderful way to start the day in the winter months. Every home should make their own broth, for flavor, nutrition and to fully utilize their food.

One of these days, instead of giving the soft, broth bones to the dogs I'll dry them, grind them into flour and use them in baking!
 
Casie Becker
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I'm still working on with the same batch of bones and they're still producing strongly gelling stock. I did leave one pot on the heat too long when reducing, and so lost one batch of stock. Nevertheless, I've got a good stock pile forming for those cold weather beans, chilis and soups.

 
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