• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

What do your seed buying lists look like for 2017?  RSS feed

 
Peter Ellis
Posts: 1432
Location: Central New Jersey
40
  • Likes 1
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator



Are your orders in yet? One source, or multiple sources? Local to you, or shipping cross country?  Any particular thing you're excited about for this year?

I've spent hours today making lists from Territorial Seeds, High Mowing and Bakers Creek, preparing to compare some price and quantity data where they have common items, and picking up interesting "exclusives" in the process.
Also went through the Oikos Tree Crops website making out my wish list.  For our Michigan property Oikos is local, but similarly local seed suppliers are hard to find for us.

I'm entirely certain that my eyes are bigger than my as yet undetermined garden beds, but there are so many interesting options available












 
Nicole Alderman
pollinator
Posts: 1265
Location: Pacific Northwest
141
duck forest garden hugelkultur
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I'm also ordering through Territorial and High Mowing. I've resisted getting the Baker Creek catalogue becuase I'm afraid I'll be tempted to go over budget buying more varieties.

Most of the seeds I'm getting are through Territorial, mostly because for me they are local, and also because their prices are a bit cheaper than High Mowing.

As for what type of seeds, they fall into three catagories.

(1) Plants for my three-year olds garden (it's his first garden and he wanted all red things)
  • Bull's blood beets
  • Celesta Radish
  • Nutri-Red Carrots
  • Scarlet Kale
  • Strawberry Spinach (aka beetberry)


  • (2) New things I'm trying (with a big focus on squash!)
  • Superpik Squash
  • Hunter Squash
  • New Zealand Spinach
  • Bush Delicata Squash
  • Red Russian Kale


  • (3) Things I know grow well and that we like
  • Nasturtiums! (I'm going for the more vigerous varieties again this year. Last year I picked some pretty one and they just didn't do very well at all. It might have been the wet weather or the ducks eating them, but it also coild have been the variety)
  • Territorial's Spring Beet Blend--I love all the different colors and flavors and the insurance that hopefully at least one of the varieties will like the soil I'm planting it in
  • Mokum and Nelson hybrid carrots. I find that normal season-length carrots don't grow for me. These 50+ day carrots did mature for me last year, though, so I'm getting more this year!


  • I still have lots of Cascadia peas and Blue Lake pole beans left over from last year, as well as daikon radishes, so I'm not buying more this year.
     
    André Troylilas
    Posts: 140
    Location: North of France
    5
    bee bike forest garden
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Oh well... I cant' count anymore the number of suppliers (in fact, yes, I can count, but there are too many to list (more than 100).
    As for the seeds, my shopping list contains 313 lines for the time being, and growing each week.
    I know I won't be able to sow everything this year, but I can't help to search new varieties/cultivars each year.
     
    Charli Wilson
    Posts: 298
    Location: Derbyshire, UK
    9
    cat chicken urban
    • Likes 1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I've already bought all mine! I'm trying to be sensible this year and not buy millions more seeds 'just because they look pretty'- I always buy and plant too many then run out of time to care for them and don't harvest anything.

    Having said that, I've still bought painted mountain sweetcorn to try here. And some blue Sibley squash that look quite funky.

    Did manage to restrict myself to a single supplier (RealSeeds in the UK), did end up ordering from them 3 times though. This is the first year I've had some of my own saved seeds to try!
     
    Amit Enventres
    Posts: 433
    Location: Ohio, USA
    27
    dog fish food preservation forest garden fungi solar trees urban woodworking
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I have enough biannual seed so didn't need that. Did get more perennial seed for an expansion. Got more squash seed because I finally figured out that they have to be of the same species to cross, so I can grow gourds, pumpkins, butternut squash in the same place.
     
    Anne Miller
    pollinator
    Posts: 664
    Location: USDA Zone 8a
    40
    bee dog food preservation greening the desert hunting toxin-ectomy
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    This is a great thread, so I am waiting to see what everyone else is doing.  I really hate paying a lot for shipping.  The last time I wanted to buy something it was $3.00 for a packet of seeds and $20.00 for the shipping.  So I stick with the old stand by, Ebay.  I get 50/50 results which means if I buy two kinds of seeds for a $1.00 packet, then it actually costs $2.00 and it is roulette on which of the two kinds of seed I bought that I actually get.

    I really wanted creeping thyme but the seller said they were hard to germinate so I am hoping to find it to transplant.  In the mean time I bought Gazania splendens for a deer resistant ground cover.

    I plan to buy two kinds of amaranth to experiment feeding the deer.  They usually don't like new unknown stuff so I can eat it if they don't like it.  And it is pretty, too.

    On my list is swiss chard, walking [Egyptian] onions, garlic chives and perennial leek [elephant garlic]. Also purple coneflower and black eyed susan.  I really want something red and like the scarlet flax but will probably go with a red sage.  I want some iris and hope I can find some to transplant.  I still want lavender [last years want list] so maybe I can find a transplant.

    For vegetables, I saved seed from everything and still have some from last year and DH is the vegetable gardener.
     
    Tyler Ludens
    pollinator
    Posts: 9710
    Location: Central Texas USA Latitude 30 Zone 8
    178
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I ordered a lot of seed mixes for my Gabe Brown-style 30 Vegetables polyculture experiment from https://www.bountifulgardens.org/
     
    Wes Hunter
    Posts: 238
    Location: Missouri Ozarks
    15
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I really like Southern Exposure Seed Exchange.  Though they're a fair distance geographically, they've got a very similar climate to ours and they offer varieties that are acclimated to that climate (hot, humid summers most particularly).  Plus they're just great to work with, they work with interesting growers/seed producers (some are highligted in the catalog each year), the catalog doubles as a gardening guide, they offer a 5% discount just because they mailed you a catalog when you asked, and the seed quality has always been very high.  They have at least a few permie or permie-esque growers supplying them.

    I buy some from Baker Creek, because they're local and they offer some interesting varieties.  Shipping is always very fast--I usually seem to get an order in two to three days.  The downside is I have to pay sales tax, being an in-state transaction.

    Typically I'll make my list, do some price comparing, and order accordingly.  Between those two sources, my average is probably somewhere close to 50-50, perhaps somewhat weighted toward SESE.

    This year we're trying a small market garden, focusing primarily on stripey and colorful tomatoes, colorful 'green' beans, French melons, and unique salad greens.
     
    Liz Hoxie
    Posts: 208
    Location: Ellisforde, WA
    1
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Has anyone tried Fedco Seeds out of Maine. I like their seed, it is less expensive than others, and they have good customer service.
     
    Casie Becker
    garden master
    Posts: 1465
    Location: Just northwest of Austin, TX
    113
    forest garden urban
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    I ordered most of my new seeds from Joseph Lofthouse. Everything that I've planted so far is already sprouting in the garden or in seedling pots. I've also made a strong attempt to use up all my old seed this year.

    Typically I pick up seed any where and everywhere that I see those little envelopes for sale. This can be a problem when you like wander local nurseries for inspiration. Online I've liked ordering from Baker Creek seeds so that I can make one big order with a lot of variety. This is my first year ordering from Lofthouse, but so far his seed is impressing me.
     
    Nicole Alderman
    pollinator
    Posts: 1265
    Location: Pacific Northwest
    141
    duck forest garden hugelkultur
    • Mark post as helpful
    • send pies
    • Quote
    • Report post to moderator
    Anne Miller wrote:This is a great thread, so I am waiting to see what everyone else is doing.  I really hate paying a lot for shipping.  The last time I wanted to buy something it was $3.00 for a packet of seeds and $20.00 for the shipping.  So I stick with the old stand by, Ebay.  I get 50/50 results which means if I buy two kinds of seeds for a $1.00 packet, then it actually costs $2.00 and it is roulette on which of the two kinds of seed I bought that I actually get.


    I wanted to thank you for saying this! I was looking for red perennial bunching onions for my son's "red" garden. The only US place I could find them had $6.50 of shipping for a $3.50 packet of seeds (they recommended that I buy 12 more seed packets for the same shipping cost). I checked ebay and found a guy in France selling them for $1.18/packet, and $2 shipping, and additional packets had no additional packets. So, for half the price I would have spent at the other place, I got red welsh/bunching onions, Issai hardy kiwi, and dinosaur kale seeds. Amazing! We'll see how they grow for me, but the seller had lots of good reviews, so I'm hopeful.
     
    I agree. Here's the link: http://richsoil.com/email
    • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
    • New Topic
    Boost this thread!