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Wanted: Breadseed Poppy

 
pollinator
Posts: 1459
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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I would like to purchase breadseed poppy within the next month or so.

There are plenty available from seed companies but I'm posting the request here first in hopes of supporting someone in the Permies group.

 
steward
Posts: 8868
Location: Northern WI (zone 4)
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Joseph Lofthouse included a packet with my seed purchase last year.  I'd give him a PM to see if he can sell you some.

Last year's seed list from Joseph
 
steward
Posts: 5392
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
2028
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I don't sell breadseed poppy seeds. I only give them away as gifts. If you are in the usa, send me one  first class postage stamp, and I'll get some on the way to you.



I love watching honeybees on the flowers. Crazy!!!

 
Jeanine Gurley Jacildone
pollinator
Posts: 1459
Location: Midlands, South Carolina Zone 7b/8a
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Thank you! I will message you for an address to send the stamp to.  
 
Joseph Lofthouse
steward
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Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Jeanine Gurley Jacildone wrote:Thank you!



You are welcome. That's a general offer to anyone in the usa reading the permies forums.
 
pollinator
Posts: 1401
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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They are beautiful! Aren't they papaver somniferum? I would like to grow that but I'm not sure weather it's aloowed in Aus.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
steward
Posts: 5392
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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Angelika Maier wrote:I would like to grow that but I'm not sure weather it's aloowed in Aus.



I bet that they are sold in your local grocery store...

 
gardener
Posts: 2007
Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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Here's what I believe, if it's not so, I'm about to learn something new.๐Ÿ˜Š

The poppy seeds sold bulk in grocery stores are the bread seed poppy which is Papaver somniferum .   Possibly the seed has been irradiated to make it not viable because Papaver somniferum is pretty scary after all ๐Ÿ˜‰ ...   but if you buy organic poppyseed I don't think it's been irradiated so it should be viable .

That's what I'm counting on if I ever live in a climate where growing annual poppies is fairly easy.

I think they grow it as a commercial crop in Tasmania (supplying the world's pharmaceutical industries)   I don't know if that answers  the question of legality in Australia.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
steward
Posts: 5392
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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I have grown papaver somniferum as an annual. They seem to do better if planted as a biennial. I bet they'd love Colorado.

 
Thekla McDaniels
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Posts: 2007
Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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Alkaline soil and aridity, Joseph?  I know you are not far away so I trust your insight and experience.  Where I get stuck is the spring.. seldom is it an extended period of slowly increasing heat, and a fair amount of soil moisture.

Maybe it is a matter of how developed the soil is.  I've never had the privilege of well developed soil.

In the Mediterranean climate wher I grew up, poppies were planted- seeded in the fall and bloomed in the spring.  

I'd appreciate any help you can provide.  It is the same impass I have with fava beans๐Ÿ˜Š.  For now I have no ground, no garden, am a guest here and there while I search... so for now I can't do any experimenting.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
steward
Posts: 5392
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
2028
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My soil is alkaline-ish, and it's arid (and irrigated) during the summer. But I'm planting the poppies either in the fall, so that they get rained/snowed on all winter, or as soon as the snow melts in the spring, so they get rained on during March, April, and May. Then I start irrigating. But some flower even without irrigation. The seeds germinate better if I stomp the heck out of the bed where I plant them. Want to give the seeds as much contact with the soil as possible. I planted poppies a few days ago.

If only fava beans๐Ÿ˜Š were as easy for me to grow as poppies!!! I have to put the favas in the ground the day the winter snowcover melts, or else plant out 3 week old plants at that time...


 
Thekla McDaniels
gardener
Posts: 2007
Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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Thanks Joseph .   I'll get some of those organic grocery store seeds and have them in the ground by the end of the week, what fun.

I have two places to experiment to Grand Junction area and a place with silty soil at 7900 feet,  oh and a couple more gardens one at 6000 probably silty and one and 8200

I'd love to have them naturalize do you think that's possible ?   Have they naturalized at your place, or do they ever reseed them selves at your place?
 
Joseph Lofthouse
steward
Posts: 5392
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
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At my place, breadseed poppies reseed themselves in the field. They die easily as young plants, so haven't become a weed problem. They haven't migrated to the wild-lands surrounding the field, but the place they grow in the field is hundreds of feet from any wild place that they might reasonably be expected to successfully colonize. I haven't tried planting them in the badlands.

 
Thekla McDaniels
gardener
Posts: 2007
Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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Hi Joseph do those bread seed poppies germinate in disturb soil?
 
Angelika Maier
pollinator
Posts: 1401
Location: cool climate, Blue Mountains, Australia
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If it is irridated it is mandatory even for organic ones. I have to google and I like poppy cake and pastry.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
steward
Posts: 5392
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
2028
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Thekla McDaniels wrote: Hi Joseph do those bread seed poppies germinate in disturb soil?



The breadseed poppy seeds fall on the ground in my field. I till the field in the fall. I till the field again in the spring. I plant other crops. Breadseed poppies volunteer.
 
Thekla McDaniels
gardener
Posts: 2007
Location: Grand Valley of Colorado's Western Slope
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Got it, disturbed soil thanks very much.
 
Posts: 271
Location: Brendansport, Sagitta IV
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Oh my goodness, those are so lovely -- I wanted poppies for along the front of the house but couldn't find commercial seed, at least not that germinated well. We had perennial poppies in Great Falls that bloomed like crazy plants all summer despite total neglect (and had roots like old carrots), and there are some in Bozeman too. I must remember to get some of your seed! thanks!
 
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How viable are the seeds if you scrape them off a loaf of bread?

I know that they have been cooked in an oven.

The only reason I ask is because my old landlord told me that he had poppies growing in the back garden where I used to feed the birds (with poppy seed bread). He never mentioned sesame plants growing. He did like the poppies but wanted to know if he was going to get a visit from the police.
 
Thekla McDaniels
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I'm not thinking poppy seeds would survive baking in an oven, but interested in what others might know about it.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
steward
Posts: 5392
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
2028
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Sometimes, I see breads which are frosted, and then poppy seeds are scattered on top of the frosting. I would expect those poppy seeds to be viable.

I don't have any reason to believe that poppy seeds sold in stores are dead. It would be easy enough to test. Just plant some and see what comes up.
 
Joseph Lofthouse
steward
Posts: 5392
Location: Cache Valley, zone 4b, Irrigated, 9" rain in badlands.
2028
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To follow up on this thread, I bought some McCormick Poppy seed from the spice aisle and planted it. Nothing came up. Planted a lot of it. Still nothing came up. My poppy seeds planted the same day germinated well. So it appears that for at least that one lot number from one company, the seed in the store was dead. Anyone else have different results for different brands?
 
Posts: 64
Location: Northport, NS. Canada
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A good selection available from the poppy lady but a little pricey. However if you save seed it's a one time purchase.

https://www.onestoppoppyshoppe.com/papaver-somniferum-seeds
 
pollinator
Posts: 1421
Location: Denmark 57N
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Here we can just buy them from the garden center, back in the UK my mother had them in the garden, once they were planted they came back themselves year after year, I loved going and finding the dry heads as a kid and shaking all the seed out. We grew them on very alkaline soil.
 
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