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What is it.... the game! Post unknown objects to ID... and to stump others!

 
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Jordan Holland wrote:Got another goodie at the auction, this may be too easy for you all.



If that's a hand-crank drill press, I might consider building one for myself in case the power goes out.
 
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Looks like a very nice Beam Drill for timber framing. Good score.
 
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I agree that it's some sort of drill. It appears that it can be adjusted to drill at an angle which is something I struggle to do free hand and Hubby's drill press isn't adjustable for that.

I *LOOOVVVVVE* that it looks stable and is bilaterally operable - after all, I've got two opposable thumbs, not just one! Don't know what special, niche situation it was designed for though.
 
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I knew it would be too easy! It is a beam drill, or also called a boring machine. They were invented in the early 1800's for boring out holes for mortises. This model, "The Boss" was unique in that it had two speed ratios, one about .75:1 and the other about 2:1. This could help cope with harder or softer woods and different size augers. The speed is changed by flipping the carriage over. This allows two different size bits to be ready at once. So ingenius and efficient, they are still used today alongside power tools. I plan to do a write-up on it soon.

(The large bit is 2" for scale.)
20201219_214614.jpg
Beam drill
Beam drill
 
Jordan Holland
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Ryan M Miller wrote:
If that's a hand-crank drill press, I might consider building one for myself in case the power goes out.



That crossed my mind, and I will probably do it some day. All it would take is two rails mounted to a post or wall and some kind of base for the workpiece. It would lack the extraction mechanism, but it would still work well in my opinion. I already made an adapter to accept any 3/8" shank drill bit. It can be used as a drill press as-is to some degree, but the throat space is only 6". I plan on saving the wooden "seat" and making a new one which I can make a set of movable guides or clamps for drilling smaller stock. It has a lot of potential.
 
Jordan Holland
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Jay Angler wrote:I agree that it's some sort of drill. It appears that it can be adjusted to drill at an angle which is something I struggle to do free hand and Hubby's drill press isn't adjustable for that.

I *LOOOVVVVVE* that it looks stable and is bilaterally operable - after all, I've got two opposable thumbs, not just one! Don't know what special, niche situation it was designed for though.



It can be folded flat for transport/storage or adjusted in what looks like  about 15 degree increments for drilling. I wouldn't have thought a 2" auger bit could start at much of an angle, but it looks like 30 or maybe even 40 degrees may be doable with a typical scotch bit, or maybe even more with a bullnose bit. It should be good for making dovetail mortises.
 
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I'm finally braving the big trunks in my work room....sorting things...again.
Have been planning to post this once I ran across it.

It's old and dimensions are 4"X6"...for now that's enough clues
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Jordan Holland
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Some type of clevis?
 
Judith Browning
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Jordan Holland wrote:Some type of clevis?



yes!
My grandpa, MH Browning, 'invented' this type and as far as I know never sold a one.
I have the patent though and a couple of them as keepsakes.  
The folks who bought his old farm with his timber framed barn still standing have a big wooden barrel of them.

I'm not sure the patent will be readable? the sales card should be though.


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Jordan Holland
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That's so cool! It looks like a very handy design.
 
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I learned a new word from this game! :). I have used more modern shackles similar to this for things on boats but never knew they were called clevis.
 
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Apple for Jordan!
What would be the plural of clevis?
 
Andrea Locke
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Pearl Sutton wrote:
What would be the plural of clevis?



Oo that's a tough one! I cheated and checked online dictionary...wait for it...clevises.

Now there's a word most would not be using everyday.
 
Jordan Holland
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Pearl Sutton wrote:Apple for Jordan!
What would be the plural of clevis?


Around here it's just "clevises," lol. I think it SHOULD be "clevaux" (has a nice ring to it, don't 'cha think)?
 
Pearl Sutton
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I was guessing clevii, as in "a herd of wild clevii thundered across the tundra."

:D
 
Jordan Holland
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Pearl Sutton wrote:I was guessing clevii, as in "a herd of wild clevii thundered across the tundra."

:D


We could use more double i's in this language...
 
Jay Angler
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And just since no one has actually mentioned what a "clevis" or "shackle" is used for, we often use one to attach a chain or loop of wire rope to something else - we use them to attach two chains together or a chain to a hook, or a chain to a loop of wire rope because we can run wire rope through single or double pulley system or through a ratchet-puller, but if we need to go a long distance, wire rope has more stretch than chain does.
Just in case anyone looking at this thread is interested.
 
Pearl Sutton
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I'm having some serious brain issues lately, I can't think at all. I need to put this away. I used to know what it is, what it goes to, and why. I don't right now.

I can say it probably goes to a power tool. No clue which. I have lots. I know it pulls out, breaking an electrical connection where the two little silver tabs are at the bottom.

Other than that, all I can say it needs to be put away and I have NO CLUE where it belongs. If it would work with a lot of things, a list of what they might be would be helpful so I can figure this out.

Help?

 
Pearl Sutton
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I was asked what size it is. The smaller section covers one finger, the longer the other 3, total width = hand wide. I'll get measurement tomorrow if no one knows.  I swear it's a common thing, and I normally know what it is....  Really hoping someone knows right off.

I want to say safety thing, if you don't put it in or pull it out, the tool won't run.
 
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Hey Pearl,   I have an electric lawnmower that has a similar safety key similar to this one:


source
 
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I got one of these for Christmas - what is it?  I'll hold-off sharing what I think it is in case others want to make some guesses.



7.5cm X 3.0cm (3.0in X 1.2in), layered wood material
 
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It's a no-touch door opener
 
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^^ door opener, elevator button pusher, hook for picking up germy crap, and a bottle opener for when you get home and need a beer!
 
Ron McLeod
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Carla Burke wrote:It's a no-touch door opener


Yeah - that's what I finally figured-out that it must be (wasn't obvious to me though  :( ).
 
Ron McLeod
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Tereza Okava wrote:... elevator button pusher


Ahh .. that's what the bump on the end is for.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Ron McLeod wrote:

Carla Burke wrote:It's a no-touch door opener


Yeah - that's what I finally figured-out that it must be (wasn't obvious to me though  :( ).


I knew what it was too, because I saw one in a store and said WTH? and read the package. Weirdness.
:D
 
Carla Burke
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Pearl Sutton wrote:

Ron McLeod wrote:

Carla Burke wrote:It's a no-touch door opener


Yeah - that's what I finally figured-out that it must be (wasn't obvious to me though  :( ).


I knew what it was too, because I saw one in a store and said WTH? and read the package. Weirdness.
:D



John is extremely allergic to stainless steel(because it's a minimum of 10% chromium - which is what he's actually allergic to), so he bought a brass one, a while back, because pretty much all the public door handles are stainless.
 
Jordan Holland
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Got another one! I'm guessing some permies will know this one:
Grain-cradle.jpg
Grain cradle
Grain cradle
 
Andrea Locke
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Grain cradle scythe! If all goes well with the oats I will be planting this year, I'll be wanting one of those! Good to see this, actually; gives me ideas how to modify one of the scythes I already have to add a grain cradle.
 
Jordan Holland
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Andrea Locke wrote:Grain cradle scythe! If all goes well with the oats I will be planting this year, I'll be wanting one of those! Good to see this, actually; gives me ideas how to modify one of the scythes I already have to add a grain cradle.



Yes! I was afraid it was too easy...It's the first one I've ever seen here. From what I've read, they were more common up north where the grain didn't grow so thick. It is definitely a work of art to take so much thin wood and make a sturdy enough frame to do this job. The top tine is broken, unfortunately, and the rest I imagine are too old and brittle to risk using, so if anything I will make duplicates if I ever try it. The blade is in great shape and is 48" long! I can't believe no one else was interested enough to bid. Definitely worth $10, lol!
Grain-cradle-2.jpg
Grain cradle 2
Grain cradle 2
 
Jordan Holland
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Since that one was so easy, here's one a little harder:
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Andrea Locke
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Jordan Holland wrote:

Andrea Locke wrote:Grain cradle scythe! If all goes well with the oats I will be planting this year, I'll be wanting one of those! Good to see this, actually; gives me ideas how to modify one of the scythes I already have to add a grain cradle.



Yes! I was afraid it was too easy...It's the first one I've ever seen here. From what I've read, they were more common up north where the grain didn't grow so thick. It is definitely a work of art to take so much thin wood and make a sturdy enough frame to do this job. The top tine is broken, unfortunately, and the rest I imagine are too old and brittle to risk using, so if anything I will make duplicates if I ever try it. The blade is in great shape and is 48" long! I can't believe no one else was interested enough to bid. Definitely worth $10, lol!



It really is a lovely work of art, some talented woodworking went into making that.

That's a good point about the weight of the basket frame. I'm thinking how best to replicate that to modify a non-cradle scythe. I'm thinking possibly the best option for a light weight cradle will be to weave together some basket willows to the right shape and use wire or hose clamps to attach it to the scythe. I imagine that would be strong enough to cut a small patch of oats.
 
Jordan Holland
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Andrea Locke wrote:

Jordan Holland wrote:

Andrea Locke wrote:Grain cradle scythe! If all goes well with the oats I will be planting this year, I'll be wanting one of those! Good to see this, actually; gives me ideas how to modify one of the scythes I already have to add a grain cradle.



Yes! I was afraid it was too easy...It's the first one I've ever seen here. From what I've read, they were more common up north where the grain didn't grow so thick. It is definitely a work of art to take so much thin wood and make a sturdy enough frame to do this job. The top tine is broken, unfortunately, and the rest I imagine are too old and brittle to risk using, so if anything I will make duplicates if I ever try it. The blade is in great shape and is 48" long! I can't believe no one else was interested enough to bid. Definitely worth $10, lol!



It really is a lovely work of art, some talented woodworking went into making that.

That's a good point about the weight of the basket frame. I'm thinking how best to replicate that to modify a non-cradle scythe. I'm thinking possibly the best option for a light weight cradle will be to weave together some basket willows to the right shape and use wire or hose clamps to attach it to the scythe. I imagine that would be strong enough to cut a small patch of oats.



It would be quite a project to build this style, for sure. There is also a hole drilled in the blade, which you probably don't want to do. I imagine you've seen the older European-style cradles that were smaller and simpler? I think the simplest was simply a single strip in a loop. This might be worth a try first to establish a baseline for performance, and then add or weave more strips in to build it up.
 
Jay Angler
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Jordan is that sort of a "ratchet" gizmo attached to the handle section? It seems like some sort of marker, but it's hard to tell if the intent is to mark in a circle, or a series of circles. Certainly a weird one - is it longer than a foot in the long direction?
 
Jordan Holland
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Jay Angler wrote:Jordan is that sort of a "ratchet" gizmo attached to the handle section? It seems like some sort of marker, but it's hard to tell if the intent is to mark in a circle, or a series of circles. Certainly a weird one - is it longer than a foot in the long direction?



The longest part is 15.5 inches. The gizmo is a small windlass with a manually engaged pawl to prevent it from reversing. It does not mark anything.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Bought this at a thrift store, I have my own weird little plans for it, won't be used for what it's made for, but it bugs me. What WAS it made for? Most of it I can understand, but it came with a pack of papers with holes in them. What was this thing made for? Has to be a pretty oddly specific thing to need round, hole punched papers.

Anyone know?
Pic can be viewed a bit bigger by clicking.

 
Jordan Holland
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Accessories for an air fryer, at least part of them.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Jordan Holland wrote:Accessories for an air fryer, at least part of them.


Ah HA! Thank you.  :D
Explains why I had no clue, I've never bothered with air fryers. They are up there with instapots for kitchen tech I am not interested in.

:D

 
Carla Burke
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Looks to me, like one of those little s'mores making kits.
 
Pearl Sutton
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Carla Burke wrote:Looks to me, like one of those little s'mores making kits.


That's the kind of thing I was wondering, what kind of odd specialty thing is this? I found all of the bits in air fryer parts, Jordan is right. He's wise and sneaky! (and got an apple for that!)
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