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This is a badge bit (BB) that is part of the PEP curriculum.  Completing this BB is part of getting the sand badge in textiles


In this project, you will knit a pair of adult socks.

Start at the toe with a double-sided cast on or start at the cuff and work down to the toe then finish with the Kitchener stitch.

Here are several ways to turn the heel: German short rows, wrap and turn short rows, make a heel flap, or do an afterthought heel (literally you knit a tube sock then add the heel later).

Here's a surprisingly stretchy bind-off at the cuff of the sock.


A guide to terminology and sock anatomy can be found here:
https://knitty.com/ISSUEspring05/FEATsocks101.html

A good starter pattern for toe-up socks:
https://knitty.com/ISSUEsummer06/PATTuniversalsock.html



Something a bit more complicated with a pattern on the sock:
https://knitty.com/ISSUEsummer09/PATTsunday.php

An free online video tutorial knit-a-long with Lucy Neatby on Craftsy.
https://www.craftsy.com/post/knit-along-2016-socks/#

Badge bit requirements:
- Make a pair of knitted socks
- must be made from natural yarns, such as wool, cotton, hemp, silk, linen
- socks must fit the wearer's feet - not too tight or extremely loose
- socks must be knit on no larger than US size 5 needles (3.75 millimetre needles)


To document your completion of the BB, provide proof of the following as pics or video (less than two minutes):
-  your materials
-  your socks in progress
- your completed socks on feet


COMMENTS:
 
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Approved BB submission
I submit this pair of socks.
I knit them 2010 and documented the progress on my old blog Trampled by Geese: https://itissunnyatebertshome.blogspot.com/

The pattern I used involves knitting two socks at the same time on double-pointed needles.  This technique was done in the 1800s and Dickens writes about it in one of his books.  You can find instructions here: https://knitty.com/ISSUEfall06/FEATextreme2in1.html

The yarn was spun from hand-dyed merino roving that I won in a spinning contest.  I then chain (Navajo) plyed the yarn to make a round, three-ply yarn with long colour repeats.





I'm hoping this is obvious enough - but I understand if the judges don't think it's enough for this badge.  In the basket is the first third of both socks.  You can see one sock inside the other.  



And my finished socks.



(I know we don't need to spin the yarn for this.  I just wanted to show off.)
Staff note (gir bot) :

Ashley Cottonwood approved this submission. Note: I certify this BB complete!

 
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Approved BB submission
I too would like to submit a pair of socks made a long time ago :)

I made these around 2005/6. The pic of me wearing them is from today, luckily I had the yarn still lying around to take a pic of it and the needles I used to make the socks.



socks_1.jpg
[Thumbnail for socks_1.jpg]
socks_3.jpg
[Thumbnail for socks_3.jpg]
socks_2.jpg
[Thumbnail for socks_2.jpg]
Staff note (gir bot) :

r ranson approved this submission.

 
pollinator
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BB submission pending approval
Not the first socks I knitted. But this time I try to get a BB for them.


Photo 1 and 2 in one : my materials and the sock knitting in progress


The finished pair of socks on my feet
 
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Approved BB submission
Here is my submission for the Textile - Straw - Knit a Pair of Socks BB.

As I do not have any commercial yarns that are 100% wool and all the commercial sock yarn that I have or can find is a blend (for strength and durability), I decided to use the white yarn I spun from 100% Cormo wool for the spinning bb.

The white socks are 100% wool.

To document the completion of the BB, I have provided the following:
-  materials - Cormo Wool that I spun - 100% wool
-  socks in progress - after turning the short row heel
-  completed socks on feet - showing off my tie skirt too
0.JPG
my first pair of socks - not 100% wool so...
my first pair of socks - not 100% wool so...
1.JPG
100% wool - cormo that I spun
100% wool - cormo that I spun
2.jpg
two at a time socks - after turning the short row heel
two at a time socks - after turning the short row heel
3.jpg
my socks and my tie skirt
my socks and my tie skirt
Staff note (gir bot) :

Glenn Herbert approved this submission.

 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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My socks were knitted in a commercial yarn that isn't 100% wool. Maybe that's the reason why the BB isn't approved?
I did knit 100% wool socks, but from them there's only a 'finished product' photo ...
Better next time.
 
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Nylon is added to wool to make the yarn more durable especially for sock yarns. I have thicks callus on my heels since I am barefooted in summer time, even outdoor. So I am hesitating whether to invest in 10 hours (knitted with size 1.5 needles) to make a pair of socks will get holey quickly.

I knitted my socks asymmetrically so the toe area of each sock follows the shape of corresponding foot, so my toes won't poke that hard and the socks should last longer.

Is there a way to do to the heel part too? For example, different stitches that are denser and more durable? Or add another strand to yarn? That will also provide more cushioning too.
 
r ranson
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If you knit at a tighter gage - about 1 to 2mm smaller needles than recommended - and use something like slip stitch heel, it lasts as long as yarn with nylon.  

For heels and toes, I often add a thinner strand of wool that felts better than the sock yarn.  As the sock wears, it felts instead of getting thinner.  

You could also find a yarn blended with silk as it has the same care requirements as wool and is stronger than nylon.  

These are just things that work for me.  There are a lot of options for 100% natural fibre socks that outlast the modern synthetic-wool blends.  
 
May Lotito
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Thanks, R, the extra yarn with felting effect sounds great. I am just a beginner and only knitted two pairs so far (one without nylon). Haven't used them long enough to tell about durability. I just feel such information would be added to the first post, it will be very helpful for beginners.
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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May Lotito wrote:Nylon is added to wool to make the yarn more durable especially for sock yarns. I have thicks callus on my heels since I am barefooted in summer time, even outdoor. So I am hesitating whether to invest in 10 hours (knitted with size 1.5 needles) to make a pair of socks will get holey quickly.

I knitted my socks asymmetrically so the toe area of each sock follows the shape of corresponding foot, so my toes won't poke that hard and the socks should last longer.

Is there a way to do to the heel part too? For example, different stitches that are denser and more durable? Or add another strand to yarn? That will also provide more cushioning too.


Hi May. I know an experienced spinner who spins special wool for socks. She has a certain way of twisting (sorry, can't explain, I am not a real spinner) one of the three strands of wool she plies together for that sock yarn. Her sock yarn is somewhat thicker than ordinary sock yarn, but knitted with the same size needles the sock will be extra strong! Maybe in your region you can find a spinner able to do that too.
 
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Most definitely the way the yarn is spun makes a huge difference. 3-ply for the body of and leg of the sock.  cable 4-ply (zzSx2Z) for the toes and heals makes an amazing sock.  

But you don't need to be that fussy.  There are a lot of options.  My singles yarn style I sell in my shop does great for durable socks both hand and machine knit. The first time I tried singles for socks was with Briggs Little and they lasted so much longer than 'proper' sock yarn.  
 
r ranson
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If you are designing your own yarn, you can also choose the twist direction based on how you knit.  Right-handed and left-handed knitting add or subtract twist to the yarn.  That's why some yarn gets more twisty or untwists as you knit.  
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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r ranson wrote:Most definitely the way the yarn is spun makes a huge difference. 3-ply for the body of and leg of the sock.  cable 4-ply (zzSx2Z) for the toes and heals makes an amazing sock.  

But you don't need to be that fussy.  There are a lot of options.  My singles yarn style I sell in my shop does great for durable socks both hand and machine knit. The first time I tried singles for socks was with Briggs Little and they lasted so much longer than 'proper' sock yarn.  


Hi R. At the moment I have two pair of socks I knitted with commercial yarns (with nylon in it). I know now that yarn isn't really stronger than 100% wool of a good quality. Probably the wool the factory uses for making sock yarn with nylon is not of the best quality. It has a way of getting thinner if you wear the socks often. There are no holes, because the nylon stays, but the wool around the nylon disappears ...
 
r ranson
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These badges aren't just about making a thing.  They are about showing you can work with natural materials to make the thing.  

Knitting a sock is simple.  I could teach just about anyone how to do that in an afternoon.  But choosing the right materials and techniques to make a durable sock out of natural materials - that takes skill.  This is the skill we want to see when you submit a BB.  

 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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r ranson wrote:These badges aren't just about making a thing.  They are about showing you can work with natural materials to make the thing.  

Knitting a sock is simple.  I could teach just about anyone how to do that in an afternoon.  But choosing the right materials and techniques to make a durable sock out of natural materials - that takes skill.  This is the skill we want to see when you submit a BB.  


You are right. So the photos I showed here are not a good example and I understand they won't give me the BB.
 
May Lotito
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Inge Leonora-den Ouden wrote:
Maybe in your region you can find a spinner able to do that too.



Thanks, I am a cheapie and right now i used wool yarns unraveled from holey old sweater for free. Maybe I will splurge in quality yarns when I learn more about them.

I don't doubt some suppliers will use inferior wool fibres for yarn by covering up with nylons. It's hard to go all natural and sock yarn is one example of many realistic problems we are facing. I am glad to know 100% wool sock can be made durable, I am also glad to see we discuss the topic in a open and constructive way.
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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Approved BB submission
new try, new pair of socks. Now it is wool, 100% merino. I'll show a photo of it and hope you see what I feel: this is really true merino wool.


I ordered the wool from a 'indie dyer', both dyed and undyed wool. For the socks I only used the undyed white yarn.


Work in progress


Progress going on


One sock finished


Finished and fitting on my feet!
Staff note (gir bot) :

Nicole Alderman approved this submission.
Note: I hereby certify that this badge bit is complete--and that those socks look super cozy!

 
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"Knit socks" they said. "It would be easy," they said.

I'm using this pattern: https://tincanknits.com/pattern/rye

I did the heal flap. I did the heal turn. I think I did the picking up stitches so now I'm back to one big circle. But I can't make heads or tales of this:

Pick up and knit 9 sts along the edge of heel flap,
PM, work in pattern across top of foot, working the garter panel
as established, PM, pick up and knit 9 sts along
heel flap, k5 sts, place new BOR marker (located at the
bottom of the foot). 44 sts]

Round 1: knit
Round 2: knit to 3 sts before marker, k2tog, k1, SM, work in pattern across top of foot to marker, SM, k1, ssk, knit to end [2 sts dec] Work rounds 1-2 a total of 5 (6, 7, 8, 8, 9) times. This is 12 rounds. 32 sts]



Where is the beginning of my "row"? I thought it was smack-dab in the middle of the bottom of the foot. But "round 2" makes no sense. I'm supposed to knit until 3 stitches before the end of the row, and then "k2tog, k1, SM, work in pattern across top of foot to marker, SM, k1, ssk, knit to end [2 sts dec] Work rounds 1-2 a total of 6 times. This is 12 rounds. 32 sts]"

Why am I knitting more if I've come to the end of the row? What are those "SM"s? Am I supposed to be putting in markers? I am so utterly lost. And feel very stupid, because this was supposed to be an "EASY" pattern for beginners, and I'm failing here.

 
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Nicole Alderman wrote:"Knit socks" they said. "It would be easy," they said.

I'm using this pattern: https://tincanknits.com/pattern/rye

I did the heal flap. I did the heal turn. I think I did the picking up stitches so now I'm back to one big circle. But I can't make heads or tales of this:

Pick up and knit 9 sts along the edge of heel flap,
PM, work in pattern across top of foot, working the garter panel
as established, PM, pick up and knit 9 sts along
heel flap, k5 sts, place new BOR marker (located at the
bottom of the foot). 44 sts]

Round 1: knit
Round 2: knit to 3 sts before marker, k2tog, k1, SM, work in pattern across top of foot to marker, SM, k1, ssk, knit to end [2 sts dec] Work rounds 1-2 a total of 5 (6, 7, 8, 8, 9) times. This is 12 rounds. 32 sts]



Where is the beginning of my "row"? I thought it was smack-dab in the middle of the bottom of the foot. But "round 2" makes no sense. I'm supposed to knit until 3 stitches before the end of the row, and then "k2tog, k1, SM, work in pattern across top of foot to marker, SM, k1, ssk, knit to end [2 sts dec] Work rounds 1-2 a total of 6 times. This is 12 rounds. 32 sts]"

Why am I knitting more if I've come to the end of the row? What are those "SM"s? Am I supposed to be putting in markers? I am so utterly lost. And feel very stupid, because this was supposed to be an "EASY" pattern for beginners, and I'm failing here.


Hi, I'll try ty to help a little. I don't know all English (American) terms and abbreviations, but I like a good 'puzzle'.
As far as I know the start and end of a row is (indeed) in the middle of the bottom of the foot. I think that is where they want you to put a marker named 'BOR'.
How many stitches do you have in total? I see here 9 + 5 from the side of the heel flap, so that's 14 stitches, and at the other side the same, that's 28 stitches. But I don't know how many at the top of the foor (knitted in pattern) and under the foot. Do they mean there is a total of 44 stitches?
In round 2 you do the decreases (knit 2 together and slip-slip-knit) at the sides of the heel flap. But I don't know either where they have all those markers. They have more than only the one named 'BOR'. My advice: just skip them. If you leave out the 'markers', I think you can understand what they mean.
 
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I've been knitting socks with Briggs and Little wool since the early 1980s.  I tend to knit/crochet during phone or online meetings, and pace during regular phone calls, I find it helps keep me focused. In in-person settings where I can't get away with any of those, I take copious notes. I always thought I was just fidgety but was told by the instructor for a course I took a few years back that in fact this is an accepted learning style - I'm a kinesthetic learner, and movement actually helps me retain information  Kinesthetic Learning Style
Sadly, I didn't get any of the athletic talents that supposedly are often associated with kinesthetic learners.

But since I've been on a ton of online meetings for work lately, I've made three pairs of work socks since Christmas. So I'm submitting a pair of socks for a BB.

The wool was from my Briggs and Little stash. I knit the socks from the top down, more or less following this pattern with a few modifications. Bernat Chunky Work Socks

To make a women's size 8 sock, I knit on four 3.5 mm needles starting with 40 stitches. Instead of making the rib with 2 knit/2 purl, I used 3 knit/1 purl. I knit 7 inches of rib before starting to form the heel. After completing the decreases for the instep, I knit 3 inches before starting the decreases for the toe.

The toe was grafted using Kitchener stitch. I find this Youtube is a good memory aid. Kitchener Stitch  My darning needles have walked off somewhere, so I have been doing the weaving using a 3.5 mm crochet hook. This works, I just have to work backwards from what I would do with a needle.

Lighting was different for the socks-on-feet but the true colour is the dark purple of the earlier photos.




IMG_2210-1-.JPG
Raw materials
Raw materials
IMG_2215-1-.JPG
In progress
In progress
IMG_2209-1-.JPG
In progress 2
In progress 2
IMG_2216-1-.JPG
Toasty feet
Toasty feet
Staff note (gir bot) :

Nicole Alderman approved this submission.
Note: I hereby certify that this badge bit is complete, and congratulate you on your Textile air badge!

 
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That’s a great looking pair of socks! I love me a pair of good thick boot socks 😀

I’m a kinesthetic learner too, and often knit in classes and meetings. When I did that in my PDC classes, the instructor pointed it out as an example of Stacking Functions!
 
Inge Leonora-den Ouden
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I didn't know it was called a 'kinesthetic learner', but I think I am one of them too. I need to do something with my hands while listening to talks, or otherwise I get distracted with thing I see (f.e. outside the window). So I make notes, or I make doodle-drawings, or I knit.
 
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