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The Wonderful World of Succulents - Any Advice?

 
master steward
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I recieved a gift of succulent plants in a planter.   I believe this is the artist.              

I am trying to identify them since there were no names with the plants.  These are what I have identified though I don't know if I am correct:

https://www.evergreennursery.com/echeveria-rosea




http://www.llifle.com/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Aloaceae/14691/Haworthia_acuminata      



Haworthia magnifica var. acuminata are of easy cultivation and relatively low maintenance, which makes them a good houseplant, and can be excellent subjects for the beginning succulentophile




https://www.houseplantsexpert.com/zebra-haworthia.html



Zebra Haworthia or Zebra Cactus (common). Haworthia Fasciata and Attenuata (botanical/scientific).
Max Growth (approx): Leaves grow from 4in - 8in tall and the rosette up to about 5in in diameter.  

 


https://worldofsucculents.com/aloe-compressa-schistophila/



Aloe compressa var. schistophila is a dwarf, stemless or short-stemmed Aloe with a distichous leaf arrangement. The leaves are narrow, up to 5 inches (12.5 cm) long, up to 1 inch (2.5 cm) wide and have pointed tips.




I found this thread to be very helpful:  https://permies.com/t/36493/favorite-house-plants
 
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Hi Anne.

We keep succulents at home and are trying to get to the point where we can easily propagate them. We're not there yet.

For the most part, we do the best with our succulents when we forget about them for about two to three weeks at a stretch. We have rather low light conditions, especially in the winter, having no south-facing window in our apartment, so it takes them a little longer to go dry.

Most succulents I've killed died from root rot, as in, I overwatered them.

If you're paranoid, or otherwise rightly concerned, about water levels, I strongly suggest that you use soil humidity indicators, or some other device that tells you when they have dried out.

Great pictures. Keep us posted as to your success, and good luck!

-CK
 
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I adore succulents but I have not had success growing many of them here so far.  In California I had a collection of about 200 but I was never good at remembering the names.
 
Anne Miller
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Yes, I am concerned about watering them.  The instructions say to water every two weeks and no direct sunlight.  The pot is not real big for 4 variety of plants though I think there are 5 or 6 plants.  The pot is about 3" tall x 7" wide and 3" deep.

Today, 1/5/19, I have had the plants two weeks so I watered them with 6 tablespoons of water.  The water ran out then was absorbed by the pot.

The plants have grown quite a bit in two weeks, maybe the echeveria has grown an inch, the others anywhere from 1/4 to 1/2 inch.  I see no growth on the aloe.  I don't know though I think the growth is from not getting enough light.  So I have been moving it to where it gets more indirect sunlight during the day.  
 
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We don't have any escheveria but we have the others you posted pictures of and more. All of ours are in direct sun all day in a large south-facing window. This time of year that's not enough light and the faster growing ones get leggy. In the summer there are some that can burn if we have a hot sunny day early in the year, but, for the most part, we've found more sun is better. Right on the windowsill it can get 45°+ on a sunny day, and some of the succulents aren't so crazy about that. Mostly a bit of extra water will be enough that they can handle it, though.

We water ours once a week, but they do get a lot of heat and sun. We also have many of them in small or crowded pots. Seedlings get watered lightly twice a week or more.
 
Anne Miller
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It appears that last weekend 3/09 the escheveria died.  My daughter said hers died also.

I noticed last night 3/15 that the Hawthornia has developed aerial roots and also it looks like it is developing new leaves at the base of leaves near the aerial roots.

I read that is a sign that it is not getting enough water.  I read to give it 1/4 cup water every two weeks.  I had been giving it 6 T which is more like a 1/2 cup of water.  I got confused due to the time change and watered it early and gave it twice as much water (12 T) than I normally use. The water all ran out and then was absorbed.

Any advice on what to do about the aerial roots?
 
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Anne Miller wrote:It appears that last weekend 3/09 the escheveria died.  My daughter said hers died also.

I noticed last night 3/15 that the Hawthornia has developed aerial roots and also it looks like it is developing new leaves at the base of leaves near the aerial roots.

I read that is a sign that it is not getting enough water.  I read to give it 1/4 cup water every two weeks.  I had been giving it 6 T which is more like a 1/2 cup of water.  I got confused due to the time change and watered it early and gave it twice as much water (12 T) than I normally use. The water all ran out and then was absorbed.

Any advice on what to do about the aerial roots?



Yes, it is because the plant needs more water. Make sure you water it deeply. I know it can be sometimes hard to take care of these succulents. Here's a quick guide to take care of your succulents: https://succulentcity.com/7-succulent-care-tips/

Hope this helps. Thanks
 
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Problems of over-watering are amplified in low light conditions. Chris mentioned root rot. If those same plants were over watered but sitting on a bright window sill in Arizona, they would be actively using the water and even if it was always kept a bit too wet, it wouldn't be as bad. Heavily watering in low light conditions is like going into the garage and watering the begonias that you are storing over winter. A guaranteed way to find rotten rootstock in the spring. Succulents can sit in the pot and look alive in low light, and they are, but it's more like they are hibernating.
 
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Roger Bells wrote:Make sure you water it deeply.



That is the key.  I make sure when I water, the soil is saturated, but drains completely, and never leave the pot sitting in water.  I don't agree with the "no direct sunlight" advice.  Mine do best the more sun they get.  Cool and damp is the worst thing for them.
 
Permaculture isn't that hard to understand. Sometimes a little bump helps: richsoil.com/cards
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