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Tell me about your favorite house plants!!

 
Posts: 24
Location: Denver, CO
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I've never kept ornamental house plants. Or any house plants for that matter. My parents always had tons. The garden is going well outdoors and now the indoors needs some greening as well. I'm not at all interested in going to the nursery and buying random plants that look nice, but I have no idea where to start. I'd really appreciate a thread where everyone could post about the plants that they keep indoors, whether they be edible, medicinal, or just for show. Personally, I'm primarily interested in the type of plants that I couldn't or wouldn't grow outdoors. I plan to keep quite a few medicinal plants around, so I'd love to hear about those, but I'm also interested in plants you might keep simply because they look nice or you like them. Include any important growing and care information that you can, and a picture would be nice!

I'll get the ball rolling:

My favorite house plant from childhood was what was called a fig tree by my parents, but it was a ficus. it stood about 5ft tall and lived in front of various south facing windows. It had a name that I can't remember, and it was one of the first things my parents bought when they first moved in together. It was a very resilient plant and lived for upwards of 20 years.

 
author
Posts: 946
Location: 6200' westen slope of colorado, zone 6
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Great topic, thanks for getting this one rolling-

My favorite is a Rubber Tree, Ficus Elastica. It absolutely thrives, despite my expertise at killing houseplants.

I also like my Crown of Thorns, Euphorbia Milii. Flowers all the time, continuously.

Finally, my Jade Plant, Crassula Ovata 'Gollums Fingers'. Totally unique jade plant, looks really cool as it grows big.

Lets hear about some more!
 
Posts: 205
Location: Midcoast Maine (zone 5b)
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Meyer's Lemon (produces actual lemons!)
Green Peppers
Rosemary
Thai Basil
Friendship Lily (no idea what it really is)
Aloe Vera
Bonsai
 
gardener
Posts: 3222
Location: Central Oklahoma (zone 7a)
891
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Aloe Vera is my first choice every time. The fresh juice from a cut off leaf works a miraculous instant pain relief on small burns -- and helps some even on severe burns.
 
pollinator
Posts: 289
Location: Whitefish, Montana
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Aloe! It comes in handy for so many different things. And it's hardy if you have a busy life an me neglect a little indoor watering.
 
steward
Posts: 3999
Location: Wellington, New Zealand. Temperate, coastal, sandy, windy,
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I don't have houseplants now, but I went through a bit of an insectivorous plant phase.
I find their mechanics and metabolism really interesting.
And I've never seen kids more interested in plants,
although convincing them not to 'feed' the pitcher-plant can be challenging
 
Posts: 65
Location: NW lower Michigan
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Mother of thousands aka Mexican hat plant is a good one. It's highly poisonous, and very invasive, but not in cold climates. It will end up in your other house plants, forcing you to embrace polyculture.

I also have begonias... Very durable and beautiful.

Citrus trees are nice. One of our pots has a pea plant, a grapefruit tree, two carrots flowering tall, mother of thousands, and a geranium. We did not plan it that way, but have become fearless with polyculture, and we get excited.

Don't forget about philodendron for a very easy air filter plant.

Ask around, a lot of these plants propagate easily, so some of your friends and neighbors might give them to you. If you happened to be in my neighborhood, I would hook ya up! If you sent me a self addressed stamped padded envelope, I could send you a bunch of mother of thousands plants.
 
pollinator
Posts: 490
Location: Burton, WA (USDA zone 8, Sunset zone 5) - old hippie heaven
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I don't think you can have too many houseplants, although people I've lived with tend to disagree!

The ones I'd never be without -

Aloe vera - my current one is over three years old, and pretty large. Grow it in a small pot for its size, keep it on the dry side, and it doesn't need as much light as you'd think - it will sunburn if you keep it in a very sunny window.

Ficus benjamina - fig tree - I have the variegated one, it really lights up a light corner, easy to keep at the size most convenient for you - just don't move it to a bigger pot!

Spider plant - variegated, best color when it's not in direct light, it loves to be shared, good air cleaner.

Sansieveria - mother-in-law plant - I have the tall one, very architectural, does well away from windows.

Thanksgiving/Christmas cactus - when the days start getting short, keep it on the dry side and in a cool window, and it will set flowers with abandon.

Jade plant - another one that's easy to keep the size you want.

All my house plants spend the summer outside on the north side of the house - no direct sun at all. Does them a world of good.
 
pollinator
Posts: 509
Location: Derbyshire, UK
89
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Aloe Vera
Echeverias- of various types, I just think they're awesome, and I can't grow them outside here. And they survive (even flower!) on my neglect
Maidenhair Fern- the echeverias don't survive in my bathroom as it gets too damp for them, but the fern seems to like it
 
Posts: 7698
Location: Ozarks zone 7 alluvial,black,deep clay/loam with few rocks, wonderful creek bottom!
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I only have a few, a peace lily, one begonia. a night blooming cerius, a spider plant.... they all go out for the summer....my favorite that I don't send outside is my jade plant. For the longest time i tried to get it to grow upright and finally realized it was not that type of jade plant. I even dusted it for the photo
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gardener & author
Posts: 2006
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
434
trees food preservation solar greening the desert
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I've got a jade and a couple of little bushy succulents.

My problem is that in my solar heated residence, the only windows face precisely south so the plants on the windowsill get no direct sun at all from May through July or so, when the sun is high. Last summer I kept the jade outside but it seemed stressed with too much direct sun: the leaves were reddish with shriveled sections.

I'd love to have rosemary and aloe indoors but haven't managed to bring them here and keep them alive. Or they and their pots disappeared while I was away.
 
pollinator
Posts: 562
Location: West Yorkshire, UK
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I love houseplants! I only have a few now, but they are aloe vera, maidenhair fern, umbrella plant (Schefflera arboricola I think), and a couple African violets. I have kept phaelenopsis orchids in the past. Oh, and I have a pineapple plant growing from a pineapple top I planted.

Reading the above posts makes me interested in polycultured houseplants now
 
pollinator
Posts: 126
Location: Pennsylvania, Dauphin County
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I was once a produce manager and had an orange tree growing inside when I lived in Germany!

I am currently in a state of flux with my living situation but once settled I want to get one of the dancing plants.

I was very proud of that!
 
Posts: 5
Location: New Jersey
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My favorite is Aloe Vera for a number of reasons. They look really good, require minimal care, and have tons of benefits. Beneficial for skin and can be used in a variety of other things as well. I have 3 aloe vera plants in my living room.
 
Posts: 2
Location: Italy
medical herbs
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My recent purchase..

Actually just outside home to take some beautiful sunny days.

IMG_20190917_180227080-1-.jpg
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pollinator
Posts: 552
Location: BC Interior, Zone 6-7
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I was going to suggest new guinea impatients, Irene!  Ours blooms pretty much all year and it's gorgeous.
 
Irene Labomba
Posts: 2
Location: Italy
medical herbs
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Thanks Jan, I will take seriously in consideration your suggestion!


Jan White wrote:I was going to suggest new guinea impatients, Irene!  Ours blooms pretty much all year and it's gorgeous.

 
gardener
Posts: 3054
Location: Central Texas zone 8a
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I can only say what i "want" my favorite house plant to be. Peppercorn vine. Black pepper that goes next to salt. I am good at killing it. It eludes me.
 
Rebecca Norman
gardener & author
Posts: 2006
Location: Ladakh, Indian Himalayas at 10,500 feet, zone 5
434
trees food preservation solar greening the desert
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My favorite currently is the curry leaf plant, which my south Indian housemate can use to great effect. This past spring after communicating with new friends online about sharing seeds and plants, they said they were going to a nursery in a city and would i like anything. I asked for aloe and curry leaf. The curry leaf was the most pathetic little thing when it arrived: it was one stem the size of a pencil, in 1 litre pot with a tap root sticking out the bottom and crawling horizontally, dried out and broken. The friend said it was in his hand baggage, and the minute the plane landed at 11,000 feet altitude and the doors opened, the curry leaf plant just shriveled up. That was April, this is August. It can't tolerate chilly weather like 10C, so I had it outside for the summer, took it in recently, and I hope my house won't be too chilly for it over the winter.

But I guess my favorite houseplant changes over time. I always get excited about a new one. Last year another friend brought me her 38 houseplants to take care of while she went away for the winter, and I got a little fed up, and decided to keep only a very few favorites instead of bazillions.
Curry-leaf-plant-2019-09-13.jpg
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Posts: 8
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I have aloe Vera, Christmas/Thanksgiving cactus, pineapple top, orchid, spider and pothos. My favorite??? Anything that grows in spite of my neglect & abuse.
 
pollinator
Posts: 204
Location: Gulf Islands, Canada
67
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My cats are nuts and love to dig in the dirt, so any houseplant I have needs to be carefully protected. I just have one aloe vera, because I can't grow it outdoors, but I wish I could have more.
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